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The Crooked Good
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

Through the voice of "Turn-around Woman", Louise Halfe guides the reader on a three-fold journey down a path where the personal, the historical and the mythic walk hand-in-hand. Louise Halfe revisits familiar aboriginal themes, but pushes them farther than she has before, in this third collection of her moving, powerful poetry. The ancestors speak through a Mother's fireside stories, and the figure of Rolling Head recurs everywhere on the path - as nightmare, as conscience, as maternal lover. The heartbreaking dysfunction of a Native family, and the haunted memories and temptations of one woman's quest, are tempered by the tenderness, the loyalty, and the outbursts of earthy laughter that distinguish Louise Halfe's unique gifts as a poet and as mediator between two cultures.

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152 pages | 5.58" x 8.27"

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Authentic Indigenous Text
$14.95

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Powerful Understanding: Helping Students Explore, Question, and Transform Their Thinking about Themselves and the World Around Them
Authors:
Adrienne Gear
Format: Paperback

Helping students explore, question, and transform their thinking about themselves and the world around them.

In these challenging times, teaching children to think critically and reflectively AND be compassionate, responsible and caring citizens at the same time is a tall order. Powerful Understanding explores effective ways to build social-emotional skills and help students make connections, question what they read, and reflect on their learning as they develop into stronger readers and learners. Strategic and critical thinking strategies revolve around core anchor books that help integrate thinking into everything you teach—from social responsibility, to immigration, to life cycles. This highly readable book includes a wealth of classroom examples and extensive hands-on activities designed to help students to think more deeply, learn more widely, and develop a more powerful understanding of what it means to be a responsible and compassionate person.

Educator Information
Grade Range: K-8

Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Chapter 1: The Components of Powerful Understanding
Chapter 2: Lessons on Understanding Self
Chapter 3: Lessons on Understanding Others
Chapter 4: Lessons on Understanding the World
Final Thoughts
Acknowledgments
Professional Resources
Index

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160 pages | 8.30" x 10.80"

Authentic Canadian Content
$24.95

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The Knowledge Seeker: Embracing Indigenous Spirituality
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

The Knowledge Seeker tells the story of the developing Indigenous-run education movement and calls forth the urgent need to teach about Indigenous spirituality.

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

CHAPTER 1: Wanting to Know
CHAPTER 2: Controlling Our Education
CHAPTER 3: The Great Principle
CHAPTER 4: The Great Law
CHAPTER 5: Once Powerful Healing
CHAPTER 6: Re-evaluating the Past
CHAPTER 7: Contemporary Crisis
CHAPTER 8: Modern Study of Spirit
CHAPTER 9: Restoring Balance

EPILOGUE: "Creator Does Not Lose His Children"

Notes
Glossary
Bibliography
Index

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224 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$32.95

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Resolve: The Chelsea Story and a First Nation Community's Will to Heal
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

Andy and Phyllis Chelsea met during their years spent at the St. Joseph’s Mission School in Williams Lake, BC. Like the thousands of others forced into the church-run residential school system, Andy and Phyllis are no strangers to the ongoing difficulties experienced by most Indigenous peoples in Canada. The couple married in 1964 but brought the trauma of their mission school years into their marriage. The Chelseas’ struggle with alcohol came to an abrupt halt in 1971 when their daughter, Ivy, then aged seven, stated that she and her brothers did not want to live with their parents because of the drinking, that they would stay with their Grandmother, their Kye7e. Andy and Phyllis chose sobriety to preserve their family. This decision sparked a lifetime of activism for the couple, which included overcoming the challenges caused by Canada’s disregard for their community. Throughout the twenty-seven years Andy was Chief of the Alkali Lake Esk’et First Nation, the Chelseas worked to eradicate alcoholism and took steps to overcome the rampant intergenerational trauma that existed for the people of Alkali Lake. Their efforts, their story and the perseverance of the members of their village have inspired Indigenous groups facing similar struggles throughout the world.

Resolve: The Chelsea Story and a First Nation Community’s Will to Heal explores the harrowing, personal journey of the Chelseas. By combining personal interviews and historical records, biographer Carolyn Parks Mintz shares the Chelseas’ transition from residential schools to state-sanctioned reservations to international recognition of their activism in the face of ongoing repression. A simultaneous celebration of strength and a condemnation of systemic racism, Resolve is a personal and deeply moving story that calls for a closer look at the status of Canada’s reconciliation efforts from the Chelseas’ perspective.

Additional Information
240 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

 

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$24.95

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#IndianLovePoems
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Covering Indigenous adventures from Wahpole Island to Northern Saskatchewan to the coast of Vancouver, #IndianLovePoems is a poetry collection that delves into the humour and truths of love and lust within Indigenous communities. Sharing stories in search of The One, or even better, that One-Night-Stand, or the opening of boundaries -- can we say medicine wheel -- this collection fearlessly sheds light on the sharing and honesty that comes with discussions of men, women, sex, and relationships, using humour to chat about the complexities of race, culture and intent within relationships. From discovering your own John Smith to sharing sushi in bed, #IndianLovePoems will make you smile, shake your head, and remember your own stories about that special someone.

Reviews
"These are resolutely modern poems written for the great variety of women and LGBTQ2S people of today. They turn the stereotypes of the “Vanishing Indian” and “unchanging cultures” upside down with mentions of campus life, sexting, Tinder, and of course Twitter (the poems have non-serialized numbers with hashtags). There is power in Campbell’s creative use of imagery and everyday language. #IndianLovePoems is a must-read from a very exciting new voice who will undoubtedly become an established name." - Sylvie Vranckx, Canadian Literature: A Quarterly of Criticism and Review

Additional Information
96 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$17.95

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Where the Dead Sit Talking
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Set in rural Oklahoma during the late 1980s, Where the Dead Sit Talking is a startling, authentically voiced and lyrically written Native American coming-of-age story.

With his single mother in jail, Sequoyah, a fifteen-year-old Cherokee boy, is placed in foster care with the Troutt family. Literally and figuratively scarred by his mother’s years of substance abuse, Sequoyah keeps mostly to himself, living with his emotions pressed deep below the surface. At least until he meets seventeen-year-old Rosemary, a troubled artist who also lives with the family.

Sequoyah and Rosemary bond over their shared Native American background and tumultuous paths through the foster care system, but as Sequoyah’s feelings toward Rosemary deepen, the precariousness of their lives and the scars of their pasts threaten to undo them both.

Awards

  • A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2018
  • 2019 In the Margins Book Award Top Fiction Novel

Reviews
"An extraordinary book." —NPR's Code Switch

"A strange and powerful Native American Bildungsroman . . . this novel breathes with a dark, pulsing life of its own." —The Tulsa Voice

" This is a dark story that depicts the loneliness and pain of unwanted children and the foster care system where they end up . . . authentic and humane. " — The Oklahoman

"A powerful testament to one young Native American’s will to survive his lonely existence. Sequoyah’s community and experience is one we all need to know, and Hobson delivers the young man’s story in a deeply profound narrative." —KMUW Wichita Public Radio

"I was really struck by the intelligence of the book, as well as the significance of the story that he's telling, about what it's like to be a modern Indigenous person in this country, as a Native American, and to be in the foster care system. I was very struck by the plot of it—it's very well written, it's very propulsive, it's very readable for literary fiction, and I would recommend it heartily to book clubs." —Min Jin Lee, author of Pachinko

"Dreamlike prose . . . Where the Dead Sit Talking is an exploration of whether it’s possible for a person to heal when all the world sees is a battlefield of scars. " — San Diego CityBeat

"The latest from Hobson is a smart, dark novel of adolescence, death, and rural secrets set in late-1980s Oklahoma. Hobson’s narrative control is stunning, carrying the reader through scenes and timelines with verbal grace and sparse detail. Far more than a mere coming-of-age story, this is a remarkable and moving novel ." — Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

"A masterly tale of life and death, hopes and fears, secrets and lies." —Kirkus Reviews, Starred Review

"Hobson's eloquent prose and storyline will keep literary and general fiction readers turning pages. Its teen protagonists offer interest for young adults." —Library Journal

"[A] poignant and disturbing coming-of-age story . . . Hobson presents a painfully visceral drama about the overlooked lives of those struggling on the periphery of mainstream society." —Booklist

"Where the Dead Sit Talking is a sensitive and searching exploration of a youth forged in turbulence, in the endless aftermath of displacement and loss. Sequoyah’s voice is powerfully singular—both wounded and wounding—and this novel is a thrilling confirmation of Brandon Hobson’s immense gifts on the page.” —Laura van den Berg, author of Find Me

Additional Information
5.50" x 8.25"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$20.00

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Incorporating Culture: How Indigenous People Are Reshaping the Northwest Coast Art Industry
Authors:
Solen Roth
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Fragments of culture often become commodities when the tourism and heritage business showcases local artistic and cultural practice. And frequently, this industry is developed without the consent of those whose culture is being commercialized. What does this say about appropriation, social responsibility, and intercultural relationships? And what happens when local communities become more involved in this cultural marketplace?

Based on eighteen months of ethnographic fieldwork, Incorporating Culture examines how Northwest Coast Indigenous artists and entrepreneurs are cultivating more equitable relationships with the companies that reproduce their designs on everyday objects. Focusing on the vibrant Indigenous art industry in Vancouver, Solen Roth details how artists are slowly but surely modifying an essentially capitalist market to reflect Indigenous models of property, relationships, and economics.

Moving beyond the assumption that the commodification of Indigenous culture is necessarily exploitative, Incorporating Culture discusses how communities can treat culture as a resource in a way that nurtures rather than depletes it. From this fresh perspective, Roth sheds light on the processes by which Indigenous people have been asserting control over the Northwest Coast art industry – not by shutting the market down but by reshaping it in order to reflect their communities’ values and ways of life.

Scholars and students in a broad range of disciplines who are interested in the relationship between commerce and Indigenous art and design will find this book illuminating, as will thoughtful participants in the Indigenous art market.

Reviews
"Roth takes a refreshing approach to Northwest Coast art. It does not privilege the historical, nor the fine art market or ceremonial art. Rather, Roth takes seriously the artware made to leave Indigenous communities. She makes a compelling case for reframing the ‘souvenir’ art market on the Pacific Coast as ‘culturally modified capitalism,’ in which Indigenous stakeholders actively shape this industry in locally meaningful ways through intensive engagement with provincial, federal, and global systems." - Cara Krmpotich, associate professor, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

"There is no other book on Native American art like Incorporating Culture. It brings forward new and fascinating perspectives on the myriad examples of Northwest Coast First Nations artware seen in shops, revealing the strength of Northwest Coast values and practices as they penetrate and influence what might be seen from the outside as a strictly capitalist venture." - Aldona Jonaitis, director, University of Alaska Museum of the North

Educator Information
Useful for these subject areas: Indigenous Studies, Art History, Cultural Studies, Anthropology, Indigenous Art

Additional Information
240 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$32.95

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Dana Claxton
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Sioux; Lakota; Hunkpapa;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Known for her expansive multidisciplinary approach to art making Vancouver-based Dana Claxton, who is Hunkpapa Lakota (Sioux), has investigated notions of Indigenous identity, beauty, gender and the body, as well as broader social and political issues through a practice which encompasses photography, film, video and performance. Rooted in contemporary art strategies, her practice critiques the representations of Indigenous people that circulate in art, literature and popular culture in general. In doing so, Claxton regularly combines Lakota traditions with "Western" influences, using a powerful and emotive "mix, meld and mash" approach to address the oppressive legacies of colonialism and to articulate Indigenous world views, histories and spirituality. This timely catalogue is the first monograph to examine the full breadth and scope of Claxton's practice. It's extensively illustrated and includes essays by Claxton's colleague Jaleh Mansoor, Associate Professor in the Department of Art History, Visual Art & Theory at the University of British Columbia; Monika Kin Gagnon, Professor in the Communications Department at Concordia University, who has followed Claxton's work for 25 years; Olivia Michiko Gagnon, a New York-based scholar and doctoral student in Performance Studies; and Grant Arnold, Audain Curator of British Columbia Art at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

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160 pages | 9.08" x 10.60"

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Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$40.00

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Lure: Sustainable Seafood Recipes from the West Coast
Authors:
Ned Bell
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Eating sustainable seafood is about opening your mind (and fridge) to a vast array of fish and shellfish that you might not have considered before - and the Pacific Coast is blessed with an abundance of wild species. With Lure, readers embark on a wild Pacific adventure and discover the benefits of healthy oils and rich nutrients that seafood delivers. This stunning cookbook, authored by chef and seafood advocate Ned Bell, features simple techniques and straightforward sustainability guidelines around Pacific species as well as 80 delicious recipes to make at home. You'll find tacos, fish burgers, chowders, and sandwiches- the types of dishes that fill bellies, soothe souls and get happy dinner table conversation flowing on a weekday night - as well as elegant (albeit still simple-to-execute) dinner party options, such as crudo, ceviche, and caviar butter.

Reviews
“Ned’s first cookbook Lure features a set of sustainable seafood recipes that are accessible, well considered and, most importantly, delicious.” – Michael Cimarusti, Michelin-starred chef of Providence

“Ned Bell is one of that laudable cadre of young chefs who has taken the trouble to learn not only the names of his farmers but also his fishers.  If, like me, you’re committed to sustaining the health of the oceans, you’ll grab this book that shows you how to cook all the responsibly-harvested gifts of the sea.” – Tom Douglas, American executive chef, restaurateur, author, and radio talk show host.

“I’m going to go out on a limb and suggest that Lure is the most important cookbook of the year, if not the decade.” – Tim Pawsey, Hired Belly

Lure is at once a cookbook, coffee table showpiece, and educational manual. With straightforward recipes and a digestible approach to ocean sustainability, Lure is a beautiful and accessible guide for the conscientious cook.” – NUVO Magazine

“It should come as no surprise that Lure, his first cookbook, co-written with ace writer Valerie Howes, is just wonderful too. It’s a beauty of bookbright, full of gorgeous imagery and laid out in an attractive easy-to-understand style” – BC Living

Additional Information
304 pages | 9.14" x 9.99"

Authentic Canadian Content
$29.99

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People Among the People: The Public Art of Susan Point
Authors:
Robert D. Watt
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

“I feel that it is important to re-establish our Salish footprint upon our lands, to create a visual expression of the link between the past and present that is both accessible and people-friendly. . . . I create unique, ‘original’ artwork that honours both my people and the diverse group of peoples from around the world who have come to live upon our lands on the Northwest Coast. My hope is that my art leaves a lasting impression on visitors, locals, and the surrounding communities.” — Susan Point

This beautifully designed book is the first to explore Susan Point's publicly commissioned artworks from coast to coast.

Susan Point’s unique artworks have been credited with almost single-handedly reviving the traditional Coast Salish art style. Once nearly lost to the effects of colonization, the crescents, wedges, and human and animal forms characteristic of the art of First Nations peoples living around the Salish Sea can now be seen around the world, reinvigorated with modern materials and techniques, in her serigraphs and public art installations—and in the works of a new generation of artists that she’s inspired.

People Among the People beautifully displays the breadth of Susan Point’s public art, from cast-iron manhole covers to massive carved cedar spindle whorls, installed in locations from Vancouver to Zurich. Through extensive interviews and access to her archives, Robert D. Watt tells the story of each piece, whether it’s the evolution from sketch to carving to casting, or the significance of the images and symbolism, which is informed by surviving traditional Salish works Point has studied and the Oral Traditions of her Musqueam family and elders.

In her long quest to re-establish a Coast Salish footprint in Southwest British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest of the US, Point has received many honours, including the Order of Canada and the Audain Lifetime Achievement Award. This gorgeous and illuminating book makes it clear they are all richly deserved.

Additional Information
208 pages | 10.17" x 12.39"

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Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$50.00

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Beau Dick: Devoured by Consumerism
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Accompanying an exhibition of Beau Dick’s work, this beautifully illustrated volume distills his powerful argument against our unsustainable way of living.

"With this body of work, Beau intended to launch his most overt critique of a system that he knew was unsustainable, in favour of a return to the cultural values of his people, and his profound generosity compelled him to share these values as widely as possible." - LaTiesha Fazakas

Beau Dick (1955 - 2017) was celebrated far beyond his hometown of Alert Bay, B.C., for both his political activism and his creation of striking, larger-than-life carved masks inspired by the traditional stories of the Kwakwaka'wakw. Dick's multi-faceted engagement with Kwakwaka'wakw culture included carving (which he learned from Northwest Coast artists such as Henry Hunt, Doug Cranmer, and Bill Reid), storytelling, and dancing.

As a high-ranking member of Hamat'sa, the prestigious Kwakwaka'wakw secret society centred on the story of a ravenous, man-eating spirit, Dick drew on all these art forms to create regalia for and participate in elaborate ceremonies that enacted Kwakwaka'wakw cosmology. Devoured by Consumerism shares nearly two dozen of these masks: vivid, unforgettable creations, made with traditional and contemporary methods and materials, depicting figures like Cannibal Raven, Nu-Tla-Ma (Fool Dancer), and Bookwus (Wild Man of the Woods).

Texts by LaTiesha Fazakas, John Cussans, and Candice Hopkins outline the stories that the masks depict, consider the inescapable parallels between Hamat'sa and the consumerism of capitalist society, and grapple with the philosophy that animates Hamat'sa - one that seeks to confront and, ultimately, master the voracious appetites inside us all.

Educator Information
A useful book for the study of art and culture.

Devoured by Consumerism is Beau Dick's aesthetic response to Western capitalist values and an overt critique of the unchecked commercialism of capitalist society. The intention with this hardcover publication is to contrast the Kwakwaka'wakw economic and legal system of potlatching, which also functions as a way of maintaining and preserving oral history, again Western society's system of capitalism. The book references the Hamat'sa ceremony during potlatch, wherein the Hamat'sa cannibals' insatiable hunger and consumption is 'tamed' ritually through the dance. The power to control one's hunger is considered much greater than the power of hunger itself. This book works to critique the West's ravenous need to devour and consumer by presenting works that highlight this Kwakwaka'wakw worldview. 

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96 pages | 8.00" x 9.00" 

 

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Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$30.00

Coming Soon
Metis Pioneers: Marie Rose Delorme Smith and Isabella Clark Hardisty Lougheed
Authors:
Doris Jeanne Mackinnon
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

In Metis Pioneers, Doris Jeanne MacKinnon compares the survival strategies of two Metis women born during the fur trade—one from the French-speaking free trade tradition and one from the English-speaking Hudson’s Bay Company tradition—who settled in southern Alberta as the Canadian West transitioned to a sedentary agricultural and industrial economy. MacKinnon provides rare insight into their lives, demonstrating the contributions Metis women made to the building of the Prairie West. This is a compelling tale of two women’s acts of quiet resistance in the final days of the British Empire.

Reviews
"[These two women's] individual paths provide interesting parallel stories about Metis women who survived and thrived as the Canadian west transitioned from the fur trade to a more sedentary agricultural economy. Marie Rose’s family was French-speaking Metis and a few served as Louis Riel’s soldiers. Isabella was from the English-speaking Metis stock. Both were born in 1861 and both married non-Indigenous men in unions that were influenced, or arranged outright, by their families. Both families had a strong history in the fur trade; Marie Rose’s were free traders and Isabella as part of the Hudson’s Bay Company. Both were community builders who later relied on their influence and circle of acquaintances for support after they became widows and fell on hard times. And the stories of both women showed how the Metis people continued to make significant contributions to the Canadian west even after the fur trade ended, an area of historical study that MacKinnon thinks is rife for discovery...." — Eric Volmers, Calgary Herald

"MacKinnon's book offers readers an in-depth look at the contributions each of the two women made to the growth of Canada's west, but more than that, it is a book about courage, resilience, determination and strength of character. The book was written to tell the truth..." — John Copley, Alberta Native News

"Whether or not the two women were ever in the same room together, their individual paths provide interesting parallel stories about Metis women who survived and thrived as the Canadian west transitioned from the fur trade to a more sedentary agricultural economy…And the stories of both women showed how the Metis people continued to make significant contributions to the Canadian west even after the fur trade ended, an area of historical study that MacKinnon thinks is rife for discovery."— Eric Volmers, Strength and Resilience

"This book deals with the lives of two frontier women - Isabella Lougheed and Marie Rose Smith. They both were Metis but their histories were miles apart. ... The author has found a rich source of history in these two women and offers them in a detailed account of their lives."  — Alberta History

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584 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

 

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$45.00

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Indigenous Education: New Directions in Theory and Practice
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Indigenous New Zealand;
Grade Levels: University/College;

For Indigenous students and teachers alike, formal teaching and learning occurs in contested places. In Indigenous Education, leading scholars in contemporary Indigenous education from North America and the Pacific Islands disentangle aspects of education from colonial relations to advance a new, Indigenously-informed philosophy of instruction. Broadly multidisciplinary, this volume explores Indigenous education from theoretical and applied perspectives and invites readers to embrace new ways of thinking about and doing schooling. Part of a growing body of research, this is an exciting, powerful volume for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars, researchers, policy makers, and teachers, and a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the contested spaces of contemporary education.

Contributors: Jill Bevan Brown, Frank Deer, Wiremu Doherty, Dwayne Donald, Ngarewa Hawera, Margie Hohepa, Robert Jahnke, Trish Johnston, Spencer Lilley, Daniel Lipe, Margie Maaka, Angela Nardozi, Kapa Oliviera, Wally Penetito, Michelle Pidgeon, Leonie Pihama, Jean-Paul Restoule, Mari Ropata Te Hei, Sandra Styres, Huia Tomlins-Jahnke, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Sam L. No’eau Warner, Laiana Wong, Dawn Zinga

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480 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" 

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Authentic Indigenous Text
$45.99

Coming Soon
The Man Who Lived with a Giant: Stories from Johnny Neyelle, Dene Elder
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Dene;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Our parents always taught us well. They told us to look on the good side of life and to accept what has to happen. 

The Man Who Lived with a Giant presents traditional and personal stories told by Johnny Neyelle, a respected Dene storyteller and Elder from Déline, Northwest Territories. Johnny Neyelle used storytelling to teach Dene youth and others to understand and celebrate Dene traditions and identities. Johnny’s entertaining voice makes his stories accessible to readers young and old, and his wisdom reinforces the right way to live: in harmony with people and places. Storytelling forms the core of Dene knowledge-keeping. A volume dedicated to making Dene culture strong, The Man Who Lived with a Giant is a vital book for Dene readers, researchers working with Indigenous cultures and oral histories, and scholars preserving Elders’ stories. Even more, it is a book for the Dene people of today and tomorrow.

Additional Information
152 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$24.99

Coming Soon
Wisdom Engaged: Traditional Knowledge for Northern Community Well-being
Editors:
Leslie Main Johnson
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Wisdom Engaged demonstrates how traditional knowledge, Indigenous approaches to healing, and the insights of Western bio-medicine can complement each other when all voices are heard in a collaborative effort to address changes to Indigenous communities’ well-being. In this collection, voices of Elders, healers, physicians, and scholars are gathered in an attempt to find viable ways to move forward while facing new challenges. Bringing these varied voices together provides a critical conversation about the nature of medicine; a demonstration of ethical commitment; and an example of successful community relationship building. 

Contributors: Alestine Andre, Janelle Marie Baker, Robert Beaulieu, Della Cheney, Mida Donnessey, Mabel English, Christopher Fletcher, Fort McKay Berry Group, Annie B. Gordon, Celina Harpe, Leslie Main Johnson, Thea Luig, Art Mathews, Linda G. McDonald, Ruby E. Morgan, Keiichi Omura, Evelyn Storr (Inuvialuit Regional Corporation), Mary Teya, Nancy J. Turner, Walter Vanast, Darlene Vegh

Educator Information
Keywords: Traditional Knowledge, Well-Being, Health

Subjects and Course Areas: Social Science, History, Indigenous Studies, Anthropology, Health and Medicine

Additional Information

424 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authenticity Note: This book has received the Authentic Indigenous Text label because of its contributions from Indigenous peoples.  Non-Indigenous contributors are also included.

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Authentic Indigenous Text
$39.99

Coming Soon
The Silence: A Novel
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Karen Lee White holds the torch brightly as a new and powerful voice, her style and sensibility encompassing the traditional and the contemporary. In The Silence, with the Yukon as a canvas, she engages in a deep empathy for characters, emergent Indigenous identity, and discovery that employs dreams, spirits, songs, and journals as foundations for dialogue between cultures.

Leah Redsky is a Salteaux/Salish woman living in Vancouver who struggles with identity and the difficult intercultural dynamics of having a non-Indigenous boyfriend and working for the government. Often conflicted, at odds with her past and current life, things unravel and she suffers a breakdown—the unexpected life twist that is the key to coming to terms with her past. Through a diary, she discovers something terrible happened, yet what that is is unclear until she begins to have dream encounters with Tlingit/Tagish spirits who she knew in the north when she lived a traditional life on the land. Leah must find the strength to accept and integrate past and present so she may move into the future. She will find her power as an Indigenous woman, heal her spiritual and psychological wounds through the resolution of previous traumas, and reconcile her ability to communicate with those in the next world as she comes to understand she has been chosen to be a Medicine Woman/Elder/Cultural Leader. As an added bonus feature, the book comes with an original music CD by the author/musician.

Additional Information
176 pages | 5.50" x 8.00" | Includes a CD

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$21.95

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Mapmaker: Philip Turnor in Rupert's Land in the Age of Enlightenment
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: University/College;

"[M]arvelous and compelling..." - John Milloy, author of The Plains Cree and A National Crime

As the first inland surveyor for the Hudson's Bay Company, Philip Turnor stands tall among the explorers and mapmakers of Canada. Accompanied by Cree guides and his Cree wife, Turnor travelled 15,000 miles by canoe and foot between 1778 and 1792 to produce ten maps, culminating in his magnum opus, a map that was the foundation of all northern geographic knowledge at that time. Barbara Mitchell's biography brings to life the man who taught David Thompson and Peter Fidler how to survey. In her search for Turnor's story, Mitchell discovers her own Cree-Orkney ancestry and that of thousands of others who are descendents of Turnor and his Cree wife.

Reviews
"Mitchell's work adds substantially to a deeper knowledge of Turnor, his life, his work, and to the extent possible, his character. It provides the first close study of his background, writings, career trajectory, and contributions to the mapping of North America." - Jennifer Brown, author of Strangers in Blood: Fur Trade Company Families in Indian Country

"Where books on Canada, indigenous life, exploration, or genealogy are favorites, this historical account is a must." - Henrietta Verma, Library Journal

"Mitchell shows the human side of map-making through reconstructions of Turnor's daily life ... The result is a wonderfully detailed and convincing portrait of early Canadian life in the era of Indigenous-European trade." - Lyle Dick, Canada's History

"Since the research material informing this biography was framed through the sensibilities of an eighteenth-century Englishman, there is very little reference to Turnor’s Cree wife. Mitchell, having only recently discovered her own Cree roots, is also unable to supply that Indigenous perspective in her journals. Her narrative ends with the appreciation that her lifelong self-identification as a British Canadian performs over her newer realization that she is also Cree. In her epilogue and her acknowledgements, she reaches out to her Cree heritage, stating simply, “I am listening.” - Beverley Haun, Canadian Literature: A Quarterly of Criticism and Review

Additional Information
352 pages | 6.25" x 9.25"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$39.95

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Cooking with the Wolfman: Indigenous Fusion
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

While there were major variations from region to region and from season to season, in general, the traditional diets of Indigenous peoples of North America were remarkably healthy--high in protein and nutrients, low in salt, sugar and nearly without refined carbohydrates, featuring large and small game, waterfowl, eggs, fish and seafood, tubers, berries, tree roots, grasses, seeds and cultivated food crops.

As a classically trained chef of First Nations heritage, David Wolfman has a passion for bringing these traditional food sources together with European cooking techniques. In Cooking with the Wolfman, he and his wife, Marlene, share recipes gathered from David's career as a caterer, culinary professor and host of a popular cooking show, as well as a few family favourites, like an updated version of Marlene's great-grandmother's recipe for pemmican.

Covering everything from the origin of bannock to the finer points of filleting a fish, Cooking with the Wolfman is accessible to readers of every culinary skill level, with step-by-step instructions and charts covering the fundamentals of cooking, from knife handling techniques, choosing cuts of meat and making stocks and sauces to home smoking.

From foodies who want to try locally foraged ingredients to Indigenous cooks looking for new ways to enjoy familiar traditional foods, David Wolfman's easy-to-follow recipes make Indigenous Fusion available to everyone. With over one hundred recipes including Buffalo Egg Rolls with Mango Strawberry Dip, Buttery Bourbon Hot-Smoked Oysters, Slow-Cooked Ginger Caribou Shanks, and Blackened Sea Scallops with Cream of Pumpkin as well as beautiful colour photographs, Cooking with the Wolfman will inspire readers to bring more traditional foods into their kitchens.

Reviews
“Their cookbook provides a beautiful balance of fact, cultural lore and practical tips with a refined focus on keeping it local.”— Jules Torti, Harrowsmith Magazine

“Wolfman has written both a storybook and a cookbook…a good read and a fine cooking course in one.”— Julian Armstrong, Montreal Gazette

“…Many refer to him as the Godfather of Indigenous Cuisine, in fact, his passion has always been in teaching aboriginal traditions. And he does so with expert flair and beauty in a glorious new cookbook, Cooking with the Wolfman… a stunning book that covers everything from origins of heritage foods to creating unique recipes using classical European cooking techniques… book brimming with colour and detail, and reverence for the foods of our nation.”— Rita DeMontis, Toronto Sun and Sun Media

“A good cookbook can be the platform for that, recounting stories of shared times, detailing ways to preserve and maintain traditions. Cooking with the Wolfman: Indigenous Fusion by David Wolfman and Marlene Finn is just such a book filled with the recipes and stories, collected from the families and friends of Wolfman (of the Xaxli’p First Nation), with his wife and partner Finn (of the Métis Nation of Ontario).”— Wendy King, Winnipeg Free Press

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240 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

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The Good Lands: Canada Through the Eyes of Artists
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Fifty years ago, Canada celebrated its hundredth anniversary of Confederation. At Expo 67, in communities across the country, we celebrated our coming of age as a modern, bilingual, bicultural nation—a place where anyone from any culture could thrive.

But beneath the applause and the cheerful music was a darker note. In his public address at the festivities, Chief Dan George lamented what Canada’s centennial did not celebrate: the colonization and marginalization of Indigenous peoples who lived on these “good lands.” Now in the year of Canada’s 150th birthday, we honour a new understanding of our past. We have begun—at long last—to share in a process of national reconciliation and to come together to reimagine our contribution to a global future.

Artists give form and meaning to both the land and the invisible landscape of the spirit, both the past and the future. The works of Canada’s artists—both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, historical and contemporary—invite us to see our country and our place within it with new eyes. This book celebrates their visions, as well as the good lands we have shared and shaped for millennia that, in turn, have shaped us.

This book celebrates this country and honours the beauty and power of our shared spaces. In looking through the eyes of our artists, we are reminded that the land holds us, not we the land, and that we share our territories with other sentient beings, with trees and grass, with rocks and rivers.

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288 pages | 11.31" x 9.97" | 150 Images

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Coming Soon
Wrestling with Colonialism on Steroids: Quebec Inuit Fight for their Homeland
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

For decades, the Inuit of northern Québec were among the most neglected people in Canada. It took The Battle of James Bay, 1971-1975, for the governments in Québec City and Ottawa to wake up to the disgrace.

In this concise, lively account, Zebedee Nungak relates the inside story of how the young Inuit and Cree "Davids" took action when Québec began construction on the giant James Bay hydro project. They fought in court and at the negotiation table for an accord that effectively became Canada's first land-claims agreement. Nungak's account is accompanied by his essays on Nunavik history. Together they provide a fascinating insight into a virtually unknown chapter of Canadian history.

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112 pages | 5.00" x 7.50"

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Essential Song: Three Decades of Northern Cree Music
Authors:
Lynn Whidden
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: University/College;

Essential Song: Three Decades of Northern Cree Music, a study of subarctic Cree hunting songs, is the first detailed ethnomusicology of the northern Cree of Quebec and Manitoba. The result of more than two decades spent in the North learning from the Cree, Lynn Whidden’s account discusses the tradition of the hunting songs, their meanings and origins, and their importance to the hunt. She also examines women’s songs, and traces the impact of social change—including the introduction of hymns, Gospel tunes, and country music—on the song traditions of these communities.

The book also explores the introduction of powwow song into the subarctic and the Crees struggle to maintain their Aboriginal heritage—to find a kind of song that, like the hunting songs, can serve as a spiritual guide and force.

Including profiles of the hunters and their songs and accompanied (online) by original audio tracks of more than fifty Cree hunting songs, Essential Song makes an important contribution to ethnomusicology, social history, and Aboriginal studies.

Awards

  • ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Award, Bronze Pize, Music Category

Educator Information
Audio files available on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-276681310/sets/essential-song-three-decades

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192 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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downstream: reimagining water
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

downstream: reimagining water brings together artists, writers, scientists, scholars, environmentalists, and activists who understand that our shared human need for clean water is crucial to building peace and good relationships with one another and the planet. This book explores the key roles that culture, arts, and the humanities play in supporting healthy water-based ecology and provides local, global, and Indigenous perspectives on water that help to guide our societies in a time of global warming. The contributions range from practical to visionary, and each of the four sections closes with a poem to encourage personal freedom along with collective care.

This book contributes to the formation of an intergenerational, culturally inclusive, participatory water ethic. Such an ethic arises from intellectual courage, spiritual responsibilities, practical knowledge, and deep appreciation for human dependence on water for a meaningful quality of life. downstream illuminates how water teaches us interdependence with other humans and living creatures, both near and far.

Reviews
"Downstream stakes out a bold and creative claim to collaborative and cross-cultural eco-spiritual-neo-traditional knowing and, with it, new approaches to policy and action. A timely read that lends depth and resonance to some of the material and voices [in other books on the subject]." — Heather Menzies, Literary Review of Canada, June 2017

"This rich collection brings together the work of artists, writers, scientists, scholars, environmentalists, and activists, all focusing on the looming global water crisis. ... Writing styles vary from piece to piece throughout the book—poetic, personal, journalistic, and academic—but the shifts between each are well worth navigating for any reader interested in human futures on Earth."— Publishers Weekly, August 2017

"This collection of works successfully expands our knowledge of and experience with water by merging natural science, social science, arts, and humanities approaches to water. It offers new, innovative, and engaging ways to think about and experience water, especially as it relates to life and vitality."— Sara Beth Keough, American Review of Canadian Studies, November -0001

Educator Information
This collection of essays is useful for these course/subject areas or topics: Language Arts & Disciplines; Creative Writing; Indigenous Studies; Poetry; Environmental Studies; Environmental Humanities.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Re-storying Waters, Re-storying Relations / Rita Wong and Dorothy Christian

Part I: Contexts for Knowing and Unknowing Water
1. Planetary Distress Signals / Alanna Mitchell
2. Water / Lee Maracle
3. Interweaving Water: The Incremental Transformation of Sovereign Knowledge into Collaborative Knowledge / Michael D. Blackstock
4. Water and Knowledge / Astrida Neimanis
5. Excerpts from “a child’s fable” / Baco Ohama

Part II: Water Testimonies: Witness, Worry, and Work
6. Water: The First Foundation of Life / Mona Polacca
7. From Our Homelands to the Tar Sands / Melina Laboucan Massimo
8. Keepers of the Water: Nishnaabe-kwewag Speaking for the Water / Renee Elizabeth Mzinegiizhigo-kwe Bedard
9. Water Walk Pedagogy / Violet Caibaiosai
10. A Response to Pascua Lama / Cecilia Vicuna

Part III: Shared Ethical and Embodied Practices
11. Moving with Water: Relationship and Responsibilities / Alannah Young Leon and Denise Marie Nadeau
12. Bodies of Water: Meaning in Movement / Seonagh Odhiambo Horne
13. Upstream: A Conversation with Water / Cathy Stubington
14. Ice Receding, Books Reseeding / Basia Irland
15. Tsunami Chant / Wang Ping

Part IV: A Respectful Co-existence in Common: Water Perspectives
16. Listening to the Elders at the Keepers of the Water Gathering /Radha D’Souza
17. Coastal Waters in Distress from Excessive Nutrients / Paul J. Harrison
18. Bodies of Water: Asian Canadians In/Action with Water /Janey Lew
19. Permeable Toronto: A Hydro-Eutopia / Janine MacLeod
20. Saturate/Dissolve: Water for Itself, Un-Settler Responsibilities, and Radical Humility / Larissa Lai
21. Bring Me Back / Janet Rogers

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300 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" 

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On Active Grounds: Agency and Time in the Environmental Humanities
Editors:
Robert Boschman
Mario Trono
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: University/College;

On Active Grounds considers the themes of agency and time through the burgeoning, interdisciplinary field of the environmental humanities. Fourteen essays and a photo album cover topics such as environmental practices and history, temporal literacy, graphic novels, ecocinema, ecomusicology, animal studies, Indigeneity, wolf reintroduction, environmental history, green conservatism, and social-ecological systems change. The book also speaks to the growing concern regarding environmental issues in the aftermath of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21) and the election of Donald Trump in the United States. This collection is organized as a written and visual appeal to issues such as time (how much is left?) and agency (who is active? what can be done? what does and does not work?). It describes problems and suggests solutions. On Active Grounds is unique in its explicit and twinned emphasis on time and agency in the context of the Environmental Humanities and a requisite interdisciplinarity.

Educator Information
Useful for these course/subject areas: Cultural Studies, Film & Media, Environmental Studies, Indigenous Studies, Environmental Humanities.

Table of Contents
Permissions
List of Figures, Photographs, and Tables
Introduction: EcocriticalAgency in Time | Mario Trono and Robert Boschman

I. Eco-Temporal Literacies
1 “The clock’s wound up”: Critical Reading Practices in the Time of Social Acceleration and Ecological Collapse | Paul Huebener
2 A Better Distribution Deal: Ecocinematic Viewing and Montagist Reply | Mario Trono
3 “Allô, ici la terre”: Agency in Ecological Music Composition, Performance, and Listening | Sabine Feisst
4 The Environmental Vampire: Terror, Time, and Territory after 9/11 | Robert Boschman

II. Timelines and Indigeneity
5 "We are key players...": Creating Indigenous Engagement and Community Control at Blackfoot Heritage Sites in Time | Geneviève Susemihl
6 Mapping a Bleak Time: The Mining Legacy of Navajo Nation | Lea Rekow

Photo Essay
Agency and Time on Active Grounds: A Memoir of Bruno Latour and Gaïa Global Circus | Robert Boschman

III. Animal Agents and Human-NonhumanInteractions
7 The Gaze of Predators, Fleshly Worlds, and the Redefinition of the Human | Karla Armbruster
8 Anim-oils: Wild Animals in Petro-Cultural Landscapes | Pamela Banting
9 Reacting to Wolves: The Historical Construction of Identity and Value | Morgan Zedalis and Sean Gould

IV. Systems Change in Time
10 Declarations of Interdependence: Unexpected Human-Animal Conflict and Bhutanese Nonlinear Policy | Randy Schroeder and Kent Schroeder
11 Future Environmental Action in Canada: The German Energiewende as a Model of Public Agency | Mishka Lysack
12 Culture as Vector: (Re)Locating Agency in Social-Ecological Systems Change | Nancy Doubleday

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296 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Text Content Note: Includes some Indigenous content.

 

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$42.99

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Listening Up, Writing Down, and Looking Beyond
Editors:
Susan Gingell
Wendy Roy
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Listening Up, Writing Down, and Looking Beyond is an interdisciplinary collection that gathers the work of scholars and performance practitioners who together explore questions about the oral, written, and visual. The book includes the voices of oral performance practitioners, while the scholarship of many of the academic contributors is informed by their participation in oral storytelling, whether as poets, singers, or visual artists. Its contributions address the politics and ethics of the utterance and text: textualizing orature and orality, simulations of the oral, the poetics of performance, and reconstructions of the oral.

Reviews
"The essays in this collection cut boldly across disciplinary boundaries as they explore, from a myriad of perspectives—some familiar, some startlingly unfamiliar—the deep, fundamental connections that exist among the oral, verbal, and visual arts. As innovative as they are provocative, and as illuminating as they are engaging, the wide-ranging essays gathered here individually and collectively invite the reader to join in a polyphonous, multi-media conversation/sensory experience. Gingell and Roy deserve our thanks for putting together a volume that not only reflects the vibrancy, and diversity of oral studies in Canada, but opens numerous windows onto the richness of the many traditions considered in the collection. This volume is certain to change the way we look at and think about the dynamic interconnectivity of the oral, the written, and other verbal and visual media.''- Mark C. Amodio, Vassar College, New York, author of Writing the Oral Tradition: Oral Poetics and Literate Culture in Medieval England

"Energy and optimisim...characterize Susan Gingell and Wendy Roy's Listening Up, Writing Down, and Looking Beyond, a collection of epic proportions.... The editors do precisely what they intend...break down barriers between the written, the oral and the visual, and destabilize the hierarchies between genres.... Gingell and Roy display a staggering breadth of knowledge of their field—something that could only be achieved by established and experienced scholars.... Continually playing with language, the editors invite readers to move ‘toward a more fully embodied knowing, a knowing that issues from attending to the complete sensorium and thus pleasures the knower with a knowing that doesn't forget to have fun.”... The editors, by including both analytical and creative works in the collection, and by placing analyses of such diverse things as dub poetry, medieval English, Serbian guslars, and Cree ‘story bundles’ side by side, succeed in opening doors and shifting perceptions.... The participatory, democratic nature of the text comes through in the conversational elements, and in spite of their expertise, the editors approach their material with a humility that conforms to their goals.... How might a text of this scope be of use to teachers and scholars of literature? It really does shift the parameters of artistic production and reception, which opens up possibilities for teaching in particular. The collection ‘unsettles’ generic limitations, and promotes a return to the sensual that is too often absent from the analysis of literary production and reception.''- Heather Macfarlane, Canadian Literature, 217, Summer 2013

Educator Information
Includes some Indigenous content.

Useful for these courses or subject areas: Sociolinguistics, Literary Criticism, Semiotics & Theory, Philosophy, Ethics & Moral Philosophy, Language Arts & Disciplines, Linguistics.

Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Opening the Door to Transdisciplinary, Multimodal Communication | Susan Gingell with Wendy Roy
Listening Up: Performance Poetics
Bring Da Noise: The Poetics of Performance, chez d’bi young and Oni Joseph | George Elliott Clarke
the storyteller’s integrity | d’bi.young.anitafrika
Poetry Performances on the Page and Stage: Insights from Slam | Helen Gregory
Poetry and Overturned Cars: Why Performance Poetry Can’t Be Studied (and Why We Should Study It Anyway) | Hugh Hodges
Echohomonymy: A Poetics of Ethos, Eros, and Erasure | Adeena Karasick
Dialect Poetry and the Need for Performance: The Case of William Barnes | T.L. Burton
The Speech-Music Continuum | Paul Dutton
Writing Down: Textualized Orature and Orality
Writing and Rapping for a New South Africa: The Poetry of Lesego Rampolokeng | Gugu Hlongwane
The Ballad as Site of Rebellion: Orality, Gender, and the Granuaile Aislingi | Naomi Foyle
“pleasure for our sense, health for our hearts”: Inferring Pronuntiatio and Actio from the Text of John Donne’s Second Prebend Sermon | Brent Nelson
“The Power and the Paradox” of the Spoken Story: Challenges to the Tyranny of the Written in Contemporary Canadian Fiction | Wendy Roy
What’s In a Frame?: The Significance of Relational Word Bundles in Louise Bernice Halfe’s Blue Marrow | Mareike Neuhaus
Towards an “Open Field”: The Ethics of the Encounter in Life Lived Like a Story | Emily Blacker
Looking Beyond: Reintegrating the Visual
Becoming the Storyteller: Meaning Making in Our Age of Resistance | Waziyatawin
Re-si(gh)ting the Storyteller in Textualized Orature: Photographs in The Days of Augusta | Cara DeHaan
Traditionalizing Modernity and Sound Identity in Neal McLeod’s Writing of the Oral? | Susan Gingell
A Nexus of Connections: Acts of Recovery, Acts of Resistance in Native Palimpsest | Kimberly Blaeser
Contributors
Index

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388 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" | 19 colour illustrations

Text Content Note: There is some, but limited, Indigenous content in this work (i.e., "Becoming the Storyteller: Meaning Making in Our Age of Resistance" from Waziyatawin)

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I Am a Body of Land
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

I Am a Body of Land by Shannon Webb-Campbell explores poetic responsibility and accountability, and frames poetry as a form of revisioning. In these poems, Webb-Campbell returns to her own text Who Took My Sister?, to examine her self and to decolonize, unlearn, and undo harm. By reconsidering individual poems and letters, Webb-Campbell's confessional writing circles back upon itself to ask questions of her own settler-Indigenous identity and belonging to cry out for community, and call in with love.

With an introduction by multiple award-winning writer and activist Lee Maracle.

Reviews
“Shannon Webb-Campbell’s work forces readers out of polite conversation and into a realm where despair and hard truths are being told, being heard and finding the emotional strength to learn from it, find our way out and embrace our beauty as Indigenous women.”—Carol Rose Daniels, author of Hiraeth and Bearskin Diary, winner of the First Nations Communities READ Award and the Aboriginal Literature Award.

“Poetry awake with the winds from the Four Directions, poetry that crosses borders, margins, treaties, yellow tape warning: Police Line. Do Not Cross. Poetry whose traditional territory, through colonization, has become trauma and shame. Unceded poetry. Read. Respect. Weep.”—Susan Musgrave, author of Origami Dove

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74 pages | 5.25" x 8.00"

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Hope Matters
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Hope Matters, written by multiple award-winner Lee Maracle, in collaboration with her daughters Columpa Bobb and Tania Carter, focuses on the journey of Indigenous people from colonial beginnings to reconciliation.

Maracle states that the book, "is also about the journey of myself and my two daughters." During their youth, Bobb and Carter wrote poetry with their mother, and eventually they all decided that one day they would write a book together. This book is the result of that dream. Written collaboratively by all three women, the poems in Hope Matters blend their voices together into a shared song of hope and reconciliation.

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104 pages | 5.25" x 8.00"

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Blueberries and Apricots
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

In this, her third volume of poetry, this Aboriginal writer from Quebec again confronts the loss of her landscape and language.

On my left hip
a face

I walk
I walk upright
like a shadow

a people on my hip
a boatload of fruit
and the dream inside
women and children first

"A cry rises in me and transfigures me. The world waits for woman to come back as she was born: woman standing, woman powerful, woman resurgent. A call rises in me and I've decided to say yes to my birth."

Reviews
"Poetess, painter, actress, slammer ... Natasha Kanapé Fontaine speaks with a soft voice, but her words are powerful. In a few years, the young Innue has become a model for young people and for her community." —La Presse

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72 pages | 5.00" x 7.50" | Translated from French by Howard Scott.

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SH:LAM (The Doctor)
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Meditations upon the decimation of the Kwantlen people of western Canada.

This powerful collection, all too relevant today, tells a story that needs to be told. The author writes, "This is the truth of what has happened to my people. The Kwantlen people used to number in the thousands but like all river tribes, eighty percent of our people were wiped out by smallpox and now there are only 200 of us. As a Kwantlen man, father, fisherman, poet and playwright I believe the gift of words was given to me so I can retell our stories?"

These poems tell the story of a Kwantlen man who has been given the gift of healing but is also is a heroin addict.

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96 pages | 5.50" x 8.25"

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Nunavik
Authors:
Michel Hellman
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Author Michel Hellman meets with his editor Luc Bossé and casually promises to write a sequel to his best-selling book Mile End. But the Montréal neighborhood, with its trendy cafés and gluten-free bakeries, doesn't seem half as inspiring as it used to be. Part memoir and part documentary, Nunavik follows Hellman on a trek through Northern Quebec as he travels to Kuujjuaq, Puvirnituk, Kangiqsujuaq and Kangirsurk, meeting members of the First Nations, activists, hunters and drug dealers along the way. An honest and often funny account of this trip, Nunavik truly feels personal, with the author acknowledging (and challenging) his own prejudices. While the North has had a profound influence on our collective identity as Canadians, it remains an idea - myth rather than reality. Empirical rather than theoretical, Nunavik reflects on the way our relationship to the North has shaped our own cultural landscape.

Reviews
"An insightful, self-reflexive memoir of the author's journey to small Inuit communities in Nunavik, the northern part of the province of Quebec. Hellman shares his thoughts and perceptions of the North while never losing sight of his own racial privilege." - Jarrah, Goodreads.com

Educator Information
Graphic Novel | Non-Fiction

Additional Information
156 pages | 6.25" x 8.25" | Black and white images

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$22.95

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Neechie Hustle
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Neechie Hustle takes place largely on the fictitious Broken Elbow First Nation in Saskatchewan. The novel provides a satirical look at the Indian Act and also looks at the emergence of neechie swagger of the late 1960s and 1970s. The rise of Pinokineechie, a wooden Indian, sees the expansion of Chief's Fried Chicken, with Crees dancing at Studio 54. The Senator, who narrates the story, helps bring balance back to the bannock force and to the Broken Elbow reserve.

Neechie Hustle is based on characters McLeod wrote and created for the “Crow Hop Café” which was a showcase for Indigenous talent that ran in Saskatchewan from 2000 to 2004.

Reviews
"An entertaining mix of Indian Act critique and Indigenous humour makes Neechie Hustle an insightful romp through the living memory of reserve life from the 1940s to the 1970s, in a Cree storytelling style that recalls the guidance of the Old Keyam stories, but in McLeod’s unique and contemporary voice, which speaks to the resilience of our First Nations communities. In Bobby Boy’s words, 'You can take the neechie out of the hustle, but you can never take the hustle out of the neechie.'" - Jesse Archibald-Barber, editor of Kisiskâciwan: An Anthology of Saskatchewan Indigenous Literature.

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200 pages | 5.50" x 8.00"

 

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A Gentle Habit
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

A short story collection by Cherie Dimaline.

The inspiration for the collection comes from American Poet Charles Bukowski who wrote "In between the punctuating agonies, life is such a gentle habit." Following this theme of extraordinary ordinariness, A Gentle Habit is a collection of six new short stories focusing on the addictions of a diverse group of characters attempting normalcy in an unnatural world.

Reviews
"Cherie Dimaline is a fantastic writer, her prose a gorgeous tightrope walk between the traditional and contemporary. One of our most fresh and exciting voices." - Joseph Boyden, author of award-winning novel The Orenda.

“Cherie Dimaline has strongly established herself as a gifted, essential voice in the vibrant realm of global Indigenous literature. The compelling journeys she creates for her richly complex characters invoke the profound storytelling of her Anishinaabe heritage. With A Gentle Habit, Dimaline delivers yet another beautiful set of influential stories that take modern Indigenous writing on a bold, exciting path forward.” – Waubgeshig Rice, CBC Journalist and author of Midnight Sweatlodge and Legacy.

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250 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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Wrist
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

An Indigenous monster story.

In 1872, dinosaur hunters become embroiled in a battle over the discovery of fossils in Northern Ontario as their excavation crews are driven mad by a bizarre and terrifying illness. Over a hundred years later, Church and his family show signs of the same monstrous affliction. As he begins to unravel his family's dark history, Church must race to protect the secrets buried deep in bones and blood. Set in the fictional town of Sterling and Ghost Lake Reserve, Wrist is Nathan Adler's debut novel.

Reviews
“A forest doesn’t know what the future holds, but it is patient.” I love how Adler solicits the assistance of the natural world in weaving his magical tale - fantastic, captivating from beginning to end. Meet the fantastic world of Adler’s people and follow their journey through Ojibway life and story. Adler peppers the story with the rhythmic sound of Ojibway and it seems to help tell the story in the same way the natural world helps tell the story.” – Lee Maracle, author of Celia’s Song

"Nathan Adler writes exceptionally well. His words weave together and tell a haunting story that leaves you wanting more." -Christine Smith (McFarlane), Freelance Journalist

"With a unique voice and narrative, Nathan Adler blends poetic imagery and Anishinaabe story to create something totally new and completely beautiful." – Cherie Dimaline, author of A Gentle Habit, The Girl Who Grew a Galaxy, and Red Rooms

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198 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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Coming Soon
creole métisse of french canada, me
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

One Métis woman’s experience in Canada; true stories from the inside out.

Sharron's poems and writings in creole métisse of french canada, me include insights into her experiences as a child, a student and beyond; inviting the reader to understand her life, Métis experience in Canada, the true stories from the inside out.

creole métisse of french canada, me is poetry written in a unique, prose-like fashion, without capitalized words. Sharron's personal stories enable the reader to see the bigger picture: the ongoing effects of colonialism, the historic treatment of Indigenous people, and the experience of being a woman, Métis, and two-spirited in Canada.

"if I could believe that, then maybe I could believe my own childhood pictures and words all neatly drawn and gridded and hidden inside dust devils on clean white paper, like cartoons in a comic book. I learned a cartoon can be a stand-alone drawing on strong, large paper. so I changed up the form. a cartoon. life size. bright crayon scribbles painted over with black india ink. but willow stick scratches on the surface revealed a new story underneath. clear, living sundog colour blink-blinking out and into the room. I wrote a new story that way. already I believed in the power of writing. already I knew how words could pull you in, their power unyielding. binding." - Excerpt from creole metisse of french canada, me

Reviews
"This text revolves around itself, weaves a lineage into its own lining, retells and untells stories from before and after. This text is a reach into the breach, a simultaneous digesting and retching that fetches the wretched of the earth and beads it into balance. This text allows the vitriol of history to surface but not surpass the story of songlines, breaths of care that filter into alveoli, sustaining and disclaiming all at once. This text is a single word writ worldly on our skin." - Ashok Mathur, Ph.D. Head, Department of Creative Studies, University of British Columbia, Okanagan.

"Readers of Sharron’s earlier books will be moved to hear more of her poetic storytelling, while readers new to her work have in this book an open doorway through which to visit with a woman of knowledge, energy, challenge, and wit, an important métisse/Métis writer." - Joanne Arnott, author of Halfling Spring

Additional Information
80 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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sitting by the rapids
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Poetry is the raging rapids and it is the little fish which doesn’t give up until the turbulent waters are behind it. Poetry is purpose, renewal and rebirth. sitting by the rapids is all of this and offers insight into the mind of an Indigenous man who lives with severe chronic pain and who found the strength through spirituality and poetry to put a life of alcohol abuse behind him forever.

Albert Dumont writes of sitting by the rapids: “The ancestors, living at the time of European contact had a way with words. Poetry spilled effortlessly from their lips because the spirit of the land guided their words. I take seriously my belief that medicine of extraordinary healing power is found in the verses of a poet who puts words together for the purpose of bringing peace and serenity to people in want of it. The counsels and poetry of a person living with pain are special and more meaningful to an individual in the throes of heartache.”

Reviews
"These gentle words full of love and powerful energy are like Albert himself. They encourage and guide the way for all who read them and are prepared to move on." —Maria Campbell, author of Halfbreed.

"Reading sitting by the rapids is a literary experience much like Indigenous poet Albert Dumont’s title for his collection. His reflective lines of personal spirituality and salvation flow over the hidden rocks of his life with a raw grace, and his evolving relationship with Nature and the Great Spirit washes powerfully over the reader, who may well see their reflection in it." —Phil Jenkins, author of An Acre of Time.

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65 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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you are enough: love poems for the end of the world
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

In his debut poetry collection you are enough: love poems for the end of the world, Smokii Sumac has curated a selection of works from two years of a near daily poetry practice. What began as a sort of daily online poetry journal using the hashtag #haikuaday, has since transformed into a brilliant collection of storytelling drawing upon Indigenous literary practice, and inspired by works like Billy Ray Belcourt's This Wound is a World, and Tenille Campbell's #IndianLovePoems.

The poems follow the haiku format, often stringing together three lines to tell a story. With sections dealing with recovery from addiction and depression, coming home through ceremony, and of course, as the title suggests, on falling in and out of love, Sumac brings the reader through two years of life as a Ktunaxa Two-Spirit person. This collection will move you as Sumac addresses the grief of being an Indigenous person in Canada, shares timely (and sometimes hilarious) musings on consent, sex, and gender, introduces readers to people and places he has loved and learned from, and through it all, helps us all come to know that we are enough, just as we are.

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108 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

 

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Unearthing Secrets, Gathering Truths
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Unearthing Secrets, Gathering Truths delves into the life and the healing of an lnnininew woman from the ancestral lands of the Moshkekowok, now called Northern Ontario. It is through the process of writing broken poetry--visual poetry rooted in the haunting memories of her childhood--that she provides the reader a glimpse into the mind of child survivor who was saved by her ancestors. This thought provoking poetry sheds light on a personal account of how she comes to terms with intergenerational trauma inflicted by the residential school system.

To unearth our secrets means we must face our past, and in doing so, we will find our voice. Unearthing Secrets: Gathering Truths explores the heartfelt and evocative fragmented experiences through the eyes of an Indigenous woman. Through the honesty of her words, she embraces the spirit world, the resilience of her foremothers, the integral healing powers of disassociation as a survival mechanism, and the richness of her mitewin - dreams, which reconnects her to herself. Through her poetry, she has found the courage to face her difficult past, and now as a mother, she is gathering the truths of her family to help in the healing process.

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97 pages | 6.50" x 10.00" | 8 illustrations

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A Tea in the Tundra / Nipishapui Nete Mushuat
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

In this bilingual English-Innu poetry collection, Joséphine Bacon challenges our traditional notions of culture and perception, landscape and wilderness, the limits of experience, and the nature of human being. With a surreal blend of emotions and memories, A Tea in the Tundra / Nipishapui Nete Mushuat portrays a complex and ever-shifting landscape of possibilities. The author passionately reveals a finely wrought sensibility, which elevates the subtle scenery of life's everyday events.

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96 pages | 5.50" x 8.50" | Translated by Donald Winkler 

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The Rumour
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

The Rumour is a collection of poetry that exposes many important issues of Indigenous discrimination, poverty, drug abuse, brutal violence, love, family, and complex human relationships. As a skilled painter, Joseph A. Dandurand portrays the essence of strong connections with rich Indigenous history, culture, traditions, and family values with broad but precise strokes. The poems come from author's lifetime experience living on the Kwantlen First Nation reserve and give a true picture of the resilience and the struggles Indigenous people experience in everyday life.

Series Information
This book is part of the Modern Indigenous Voices series.

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96 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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As Long as the Sun Shines
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

This poetry collection creatively reveals the beautiful and bitter essences of the world from a distinctive Indigenous female voice. Speaking from her unique Mohawk perspective, the poet unapologetically sings words of wisdom and cultural confidence. By using this creative foundation to unite distinctive communities, she expresses raw emotion throughout her journey toward inner peace from a uniquely Indigenous point of view. It is this strong expression that the poet hopes will become a global guide for her communities to follow and interpret while encountering their truths and identity.

Series Information
This book is part of the Modern Indigenous Voices series.

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104 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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Tsi Niio:re Enkarakhotenhseke (Mohawk Edition)
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Tsi Niió:re Enkarakhoténhseke is the first ever poetry book in the Mohawk language published in Canada. The poems creatively reveal the beautiful and bitter essences of the world from a distinctive Indigenous female voice. Inspired by her recent global travels, experiences, relationships and Haudenosaunee perspective, the poet unapologetically sings words of midlife wisdom and cultural confidence. By using this creative foundation to unite distinctive communities, the author expresses raw emotion throughout her journey toward inner peace from a uniquely Indigenous point of view. It is this strong expression that the poet hopes will become a global guide for her communities to follow and interpret while encountering their truths and identity.

Educator & Series Information
Poetry in the Mohawk language.

This book is part of the Modern Indigenous Voices series.

Translated by Jeremy Green. Jeremy Green is a Six Nations Community Scholar residing in Ohsweken, Ontario. He is an experienced Mohawk translator and has PhD in Indigenous Language Revitalization. His extensive Mohawk teaching experience includes Brock University in St. Catherines, Ontario and Six Nations Polytechnic in Ohsweken, Ontario. During his distinguished career as a teacher and translator, he worked for Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services, Ontario College of Teachers, and Haudenosaunee Confederacy Council of Chiefs.

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120 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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Coming Soon
Clouds
Artists:
Michael Joyal
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; University/College;

In this brave first book, Lucy Haché transports the reader with intimate revelations on self-awareness and identity by exploring both her personal and ancestral relationship to the sea, forest and sky. Through skilled restraint and beautifully astute description, Haché's prose reaches past her own contemplation to connect us all. Masterfully illustrated by artist Michael Joyal, his stunning and meteorologically accurate cloud drawings contribute to the overall sensory and transcendent experience.

Reviews
“Lucy Haché pulls universal truths from her very personal observations that will resonate long after the reader has put aside this jewel of a book. I loved each word, and every one of Michael Joyal’s perfect illustrations.” —Charles de Lint, author of Moonheart and The Onion Girl

Series Information
This book is part of the Overhead Series.

Additional Information
62 pages | 5.50" x 8.50" | 20 illustrations | Fiction

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In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond: In Search of the Sasquatch
Authors:
John Zada
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

This evocative work of nature writing traverses the world’s largest temperate rainforest to uncover the legend of the Sasquatch.

Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest is home to trees as tall as skyscrapers and moss as thick as carpet. According to the people who live there, another giant may dwell in these woods. For centuries, locals have reported encounters with the Sasquatch—a species of hairy man-ape that could inhabit this pristine wilderness. Driven by his childhood obsession with the Sasquatch, but remaining skeptical, journalist John Zada seeks out the people and stories surrounding this enigmatic creature. He speaks with local Indigenous peoples and a Sasquatch-studying scientist. He hikes with a former bear hunter. Soon, he finds himself on quest for something infinitely more complex, cutting across questions of human perception, scientific inquiry, Indigenous traditions, the environment, and the power of the human imagination to believe in—or to outright dismiss—one of nature’s last great mysteries.

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336 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" 

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100 Nature Hot Spots in British Columbia: The Best Parks, Conservation Areas and Wild Places
Authors:
Lyndsay Fraser
Christina Smyth
Format: Paperback

An illustrated guide to British Columbia's most popular nature getaways and best-kept secrets. The well-known slogan for Canada's westernmost province is "Super, Natural British Columbia," a fitting tribute to its legendary natural beauty. The entire province is richly blessed with lush rainforests, snow-capped mountains, rugged coastlines and unique wildlife. 100 Nature Hot Spots in British Columbia is a beautifully illustrated guidebook that explores this province's remarkable splendor and natural diversity. Each entry includes a descriptive destination profile, beautiful four-color photographs and at-a-glance information about special features and their locations. The hot spots are divided into six chapters -- Vancouver Island and the Coast; Central British Columbia; Lower Mainland; Okanagan, Similkameen and the Surrounding Area; Kootenay Region; and Northern British Columbia. Here are just some of the destinations: Bowen Island, Enderby Cliffs Provincial Park, Garibaldi (Provincial) Park Hot Springs, Cove Othello Tunnels, Botanical Beach, and Haida Gwaii. The locations have been carefully selected to appeal to a wide audience, from locals and visitors to families and outdoor enthusiasts. Anyone who is eager to discover new places in British Columbia to hike, photograph wildlife, camp and paddle, whether going on a day trip, a weekend getaway or an extended holiday will welcome this thorough guidebook. British Columbia is an increasingly popular global destination, with over nine million visitors in 2016.

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224 pages | 7.50" x 9.50" | Full colour photographs, maps, index

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The Herbal Kitchen: Bring Lasting Health to You and Your Family with 50 Easy-to-Find Common Herbs and Over 250 Recipes
Authors:
Kami McBride
Format: Paperback

"Kami McBride provides everything you need to amaze your friends and family with a seasonal bounty of delicious herbal drinks, smoothies, cordials, pestos and more." - Rosalee de la Forêt, author of Alchemy of Herbs

Herbs are a gift from nature. They not only help to create aromatic and delicious food, they also support overall health and wellness on a daily basis. Using dried and fresh herbs in your cooking boosts your intake of vitamins and minerals, improves digestion, strengthens immunity, and increases energy. Using plants as medicine is an ancient and powerful tradition that connects you to the earth, helps treat common ailments, promote restful sleep, relaxation, and more.

The Herbal Kitchen will help you recognize the extraordinary pharmacy that probably already exists in your own kitchen. With 50 easy-to-find herbs and spices, information and tips for preparing, storing, and using them, and over 250 simple, flavorful recipes, it will empower you to care for your health.

Whether you are already familiar with herbs or are just starting out on the herbal path, Kami McBride offers recipes for everyone. Mix up refreshing drinks, infuse oil, vinegar and honey, learn how to make tinctures and cordials, salts, sprinkles, and more.

Reviews
"Thank you Kami, for bringing back the value of herbs and spices in The Herbal Kitchen. An inspiration for both new and advanced herbalists alike, this book combines herbalism with nutrition in a user-friendly, inexpensive way. What better way to take a culinary trip around the world, play with flavor, and bring us back home to growing our own fresh herbs?" —DeAnna Batdorff, Founder of the dhyana Center

"The Herbal Kitchen is written by a practicing herbalist, seasoned gardener, and medicine maker (no armchair herbalist here!) Kami has imbued this book with a sense of joy, practical knowledge and deep wisdom and with her guidance, you will deepen your knowledge and understanding of the many healing herbs and foods found in your kitchen." —Candis Cantin, Author of The Herbal Tarot and Pocket Guide to Ayurvedic Healing

"Plants have long been humanity's powerful and generous allies, providing us with daily nourishment, wellness, support, and joy. The more we commune with these botanical friends, the more they enrich our lives, and The Herbal Kitchen inspires us to invite them to each and every meal. If you long for food filled with nature's color, vitality, and love, this is the guide you seek." —Julie Bailey, herbalist, gardener, and co-owner of Mountain Rose Herbs

"A joyful celebration of practical, sensual herbal recipes! Kami's beautiful new book brims with delicious recipes that help budding herbalists and gardeners discover the bounty in their backyard. The recipes are simple and practical yet creative - the unique combinations of flavors excite the senses and teach you how to better enjoy herbs and spices. Together, they indulge you in the herbal lifestyle - not just for medicine, but plants and recipes that perk up your senses and make life more pleasurable." —Maria Noël Groves, herbalist and author of Body into Balance and Grow Your Own Herbal Remedies

"Kami McBride provides everything you need to amaze your friends and family with a seasonal bounty of delicious herbal drinks, smoothies, cordials, pestos and more." —Rosalee de la Forêt, author of Alchemy of Herbs

"Kami McBride has created an essential, comprehensive, and beautifully written book. It shows us the way to weave the practical magic of herbal remedies - cooking, gathering, making medicine - into the strands of our lives and the lives of our loved ones. Illuminated with personal anecdotes, it is easily accessible to beginners and inspiring to seasoned herbalists. The Herbal Kitchen is a beautiful recipe for self - empowerment and reconnection to the natural world." —Donna Chesner, Southwest School of Botanical Studies

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304 pages | 7.00" x 9.00" | spot art throughout

$27.95

Coming Soon
Legacy: Trauma, Story, and Indigenous Healing
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Exploring intergenerational trauma in Indigenous communities — and strategies for healing — with provocative prose and an empathetic approach

Indigenous peoples have shockingly higher rates of addiction, depression, diabetes, and other chronic health conditions than other North Americans. According to the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, these are a result of intergenerational trauma: the unresolved terror, anger, fear, and grief created in Indigenous communities by the painful experiences of colonialism, passed down from generation to generation.

How are we to turn this desperate tide? With passionate argumentation and chillingly clear prose, author and educator Suzanne Methot uses her own and others’ stories to trace the roots of colonial trauma and the mechanisms by which trauma has become intergenerational, and she explores the Indigenous ways of knowing that can lead us toward change.

Reviews
“This book is accessible, relatable, and full of storytelling about real people. It deeply resonates with me as a traditional counsellor, educator, and Indigenous person. Suzanne Methot, a brave Nehiyaw writer and community helper, takes up the challenges of logically explaining a child’s traumatized brain and body and how these impacts continue into adulthood. Methot also explores Indigenous health-care models, proving that Indigenous values provide solutions. This book uncovers the critical need for legislation that moves from creating ‘a renewed relationship’ with Indigenous peoples to creating real structural change.” — Dr. Cyndy Baskin, Mi’kmaq Nation, Associate Professor, School of Social Work, Ryerson University

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368 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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Words Have a Past: The English Language, Colonialism, and the Newspapers of Indian Boarding Schools
Authors:
Jane Griffith
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

For nearly 100 years, Indian boarding schools in Canada and the US produced newspapers read by white settlers, government officials, and Indigenous parents. These newspapers were used as a settler colonial tool, yet within these tightly controlled narratives there also existed sites of resistance. This book traces colonial narratives of language, time, and place from the nineteenth-century to the present day, post-Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Educator Information
1. Bury the Lede: Introduction
2. Printer’s Devil: The Trade of Newspapers
3. Indigenous Languages Did Not Disappear: English Language Instruction
4. "Getting Indian Words": Representations of Indigenous Languages
5. Ahead by a Century: Time on Paper
6. Anachronism: Reading the Nineteenth Century Today
7. Layout: Space, Place, and Land
8. Concluding Thoughts

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256 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$26.95

Coming Soon
Resurgence and Reconciliation: Indigenous-Settler Relations and Earth Teachings
Editors:
Michael Asch
John Borrows
James Tully
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

The two major schools of thought in Indigenous-Settler relations on the ground, in the courts, in public policy, and in research are resurgence and reconciliation. Resurgence refers to practices of Indigenous self-determination and cultural renewal whereas reconciliation refers to practices of reconciliation between Indigenous and Settler nations, such as nation-with-nation treaty negotiations. Reconciliation also refers to the sustainable reconciliation of both Indigenous and Settler peoples with the living earth as the grounds for both resurgence and Indigenous-Settler reconciliation.

Critically and constructively analyzing these two schools from a wide variety of perspectives and lived experiences, this volume connects both discourses to the ecosystem dynamics that animate the living earth. Resurgence and Reconciliation is multi-disciplinary, blending law, political science, political economy, women's studies, ecology, history, anthropology, sustainability, and climate change. Its dialogic approach strives to put these fields in conversation and draw out the connections and tensions between them.

By using “earth-teachings” to inform social practices, the editors and contributors offer a rich, innovative, and holistic way forward in response to the world’s most profound natural and social challenges. This timely volume shows how the complexities and interconnections of resurgence and reconciliation and the living earth are often overlooked in contemporary discourse and debate.

Reviews
"Resurgence and Reconciliation provides a broader critical framework from which readers may begin to reset the charged political landscape of reconciliation. In the quickly expanding literature, law, and activism, some of the urgency of reconciliation has been unnecessarily lost. This book calls for quiet contemplation and a peaceful reframing of discussion and negotiations in what has become a noisy, busy field of Canada’s national reconciliation project." - Jeffery G. Hewitt, Faculty of Law, University of Windsor

"This collection represents a sustained and engaged dialogue between eminent and emerging scholars of Indigenous rights as they attempt to conceptualize, critique, collaborate, and document relationships of reconciliation and resurgence. The editors and contributors take on the complex debates, challenges, intersections, and fractions facing Canadians, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, making this a profoundly important counter-colonial work." - Jane McMillan, Department of Anthropology, St Francis Xavier University

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384 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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The Sleeping Giant Awakens: Genocide, Indian Residential Schools, and the Challenge of Conciliation
Authors:
David B. MacDonald
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Confronting the truths of Canada’s Indian Residential School system has been likened to waking a sleeping giant. In this book, David B. MacDonald uses genocide as an analytical tool to better understand Canada’s past and present relationships between settlers and Indigenous peoples. Starting with a discussion of how genocide is defined in domestic and international law, the book applies the concept to the forced transfer of Indigenous children to residential schools and the "Sixties Scoop," in which Indigenous children were taken from their communities and placed in foster homes or adopted.

Based on archival research and extensive interviews with residential school survivors, officials at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, and others, The Sleeping Giant Awakens offers a unique and timely perspective on the prospects for conciliation after genocide, exploring how moving forward together is difficult in a context where many settlers know little of the residential schools and the ongoing legacies of colonization, and need to have a better conception of Indigenous rights. It offers a detailed analysis of how the TRC approached genocide in its deliberations and in the Final Report.

Crucially, MacDonald engages critics who argue that the term genocide impedes understanding of the IRS system and imperils prospects for conciliation. By contrast, this book sees genocide recognition as an important basis for meaningful discussions of how to engage Indigenous-settler relations in respectful and proactive ways.

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224 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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Coming Soon
Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism
Authors:
John Borrows
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Indigenous traditions can be uplifting, positive, and liberating forces when they are connected to living systems of thought and practice. Problems arise when they are treated as timeless models of unchanging truth that require unwavering deference and unquestioning obedience. Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism celebrates the emancipatory potential of Indigenous traditions, considers their value as the basis for good laws and good lives, and critiques the failure of Canadian constitutional traditions to recognize their significance.

Demonstrating how Canada’s constitutional structures marginalize Indigenous peoples’ ability to exercise power in the real world, John Borrows uses Ojibwe law, stories, and principles to suggest alternative ways in which Indigenous peoples can work to enhance freedom. Among the stimulating issues he approaches are the democratic potential of civil disobedience, the hazards of applying originalism rather than living tree jurisprudence in the interpretation of Aboriginal and treaty rights, American legislative actions that could also animate Indigenous self-determination in Canada, and the opportunity for Indigenous governmental action to address violence against women.

Awards

  • 2017 Donald Smiley Prize awarded by the Canadian Political Science Association joint winner

Reviews
"This remarkable work is at once challenging and accessible, philosophical and practical, and wide-ranging while firmly rooted in Anishinaabe tradition. Borrows takes a realistic, creative, and intellectually rigorous approach to some of the most difficult and pressing issues in Indigenous law, constitutional law, and political philosophy, as well as all readers who wish to better understand the relationship between indigenous peoples and Canada."— Katherine Starks, Saskatchewan Law Review

Additional Information
384 pages | 5.98" x 8.99"

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$35.95

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Ma peau aime le Nord
Format: Paperback

Ma peau aime le Nord, premier recueil de poésie de Manon Nolin, dévoile l’attachement sans borne qu’a la poète innue pour sa culture, pour les traditions de ses ancêtres, pour son territoire. Son écriture jette un regard intime sur la vulnérabilité d’un peuple, d’une femme. Au fil des pages, un désir de nommer, de dénoncer et une volonté de s’affirmer se manifestent. Le chemin moderne vers la tradition se profile au cœur de l’immensité nordique.
 
tu n’as pas eu le temps de me dire
la forêt des anciens et nos coutumes
 
perdue entre la route rouge
et l’autoroute blanche
 
celle de béton plutôt que de lichen
 
je te raconte notre histoire
je chante dans le tremblement du shaputuan
toi, grand-père mon territoire
 
pardonne à la lune la noirceur de notre peuple
une histoire sans toi   sans moi   sans notre peuple
 
moi, femme innue       colonisée
toi, grand-père à demi sauvage
et nos peuples   anciens nomades 
tout à fait sauvages

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Poetry

 

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