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in Traditional Territory: "Ojibway"

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Kids Books
Racin' Jason
Traditional Territory: Métis, Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • After helping his Mishoomis (Grandfather) save an orphaned Appaloosa colt from a bog, Jason takes a special interest in caring for it which he names Binesi or Thunderbird. At school, the bullies make fun of his affection for the funnylooking colt he hopes to race one day. They laugh and call him Racin Jason.With support from his Grandparents, Jason raises and trains Binesi. On the day of the big race, Jason and Binesi are ready. The teasing only makes Jason more determined than ever to win.

$12.95

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Kids Books
Spirit of the White Bison
Traditional Territory: Métis, Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • A young bison growing up on the plains in the late 1800s faces peril at the hands of soldiers, who are destroying the great buffalo herds as a way to control native tribes. He is befriended by a native warrior and a white hunter who try to save him and his herd from annihilation.

$17.00

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Teen Books
Deadly Loyalties
Author: Jennifer Storm
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • Deadly Loyalties is set in an urban lieu that is rife with young gangs who recruit their members as fresh as they can get them. Blaise, a 14-year-old girl and the narrator of Deadly Loyalties, is in the centre of this urban gang setting. An innocent bystander she witnesses the brutal murder of her good friend Sheldon by his rival gang. Due to her witnessing this murder, Blaise is pulled into a gang war. An engrossing and compelling coming of age story depicting the gritty and often gruesome realities of life on the streets, Deadly Loyalties is an open and honest look at the violence and pressures teenagers face when trying to belong. This page turning love story is from a teenagers perspective and reveals to the reader how some bad choices are not always rooted in bad values. A search for belonging can often result in mistaken loyalties. This struggle through teenage angst is a tale of friendship, betrayal and redemption, of loyalty, revenge and survival.

$16.95

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Teen Books
The Ojibway Dream
Author: Arthur Shilling
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • In a series of 21 paintings Shilling re-creates the faces of his Ojibway people – unforgettable for the suffering under the quietness, the courage, and dignity in the pain. He accompanies the art with a poetic text as compelling as the paintings – and writes of sleep and dreams and death, and of his use of color to fight off fear and darkness.

$19.95

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Kids Books
Ojibway Animals
Author: Native Explore
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Board Book
$9.00

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Kids Books
Ojibway Clans
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Hardcover
$12.00

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Teen Books
Him Standing
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • When Lucas Smoke learns the Ojibway art of carving from his grandfather, he proves to be a natural. He can literally make people come to life in wood. Then Lucas's growing reputation attracts a mysterious stranger, who offers him a large advance to carve a spirit mask.
    This mask is to represent the master, but Lucas must find its face in his dreams. As his dreams become more and more disturbing, he feels himself changing. And the mask takes control of his life. Then a chance encounter with an old woman introduces him to the identity of the master. He is an ancient sorcerer named Him Standing, a powerful and dark wizard. The more Lucas works on the mask, the closer Him Standing comes to emerging from the dream world to walk the earth again. What follows is a race against time and the forces of evil in this supernatural thriller.

$9.95

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Books
Preserving the Sacred: Historical Perspectives on the Ojibwa Midewiwin
Author: Michael Angel
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • The Midewiwin is the traditional religious belief system central to the world view of Ojibwa in Canada and the US. It is a highly complex and rich series of sacred teachings and narratives whose preservation enabled the Ojibwa to withstand severe challenges to their entire social fabric throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. It remains an important living and spiritual tradition for many Aboriginal people today.

    The rituals of the Midewiwin were observed by many 19th century Euro-Americans, most of whom approached these ceremonies with hostility and suspicion. As a result, although there were many accounts of the Midewiwin published in the 19th century, they were often riddled with misinterpretations and inaccuracies.

    Historian Michael Angel compares the early texts written about the Midewiwin, and identifies major, common misconceptions in these accounts. In his explanation of the historical role played by the Midewiwin, he provides alternative viewpoints and explanations of the significance of the ceremonies, while respecting the sacred and symbolic nature of the Midewiwin rituals, songs, and scrolls.

$24.95

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Books
Me Funny
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • An irreverent, insightful take on our First Nations' great gift to Canada, delivered by a stellar cast of contributors. Humour has always been an essential part of North American Aboriginal culture. This fact remained unnoticed by most settlers, however, since non-Aboriginals just didn't get the joke. Indians, it was believed, never laughed. But Indians themselves always knew better. As an award-winning playwright, columnist and comedy-sketch creator, Drew Hayden Taylor has spent fifteen years writing and researching Aboriginal humour. For this book, he asked a leading group of writers from a variety of fields -- among them such celebrated wordsmiths as Thomas King, Lee Maracle and Tomson Highway -- to take a look at what makes Aboriginal humour tick. Their challenging, informative and hilarious contributions examine the use of humour in areas as diverse as stand-up comedy, fiction, visual art, drama, performance, poetry, traditional storytelling and education. As Me Funny makes clear, there is no single definition of Aboriginal humour. But the contributors do agree on some common ground: Native humour pushes the envelope. With this collection, readers will have the unforgettable opportunity to appreciate that for themselves.

$22.95

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Books
A Quality of Light
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • My life as a Kane was lit in the Indigos, Aquamarines and Magentas of a home built on quiet faith and prayer. But Johnny changed all that. Where I had stood transfixed by the gloss on the surface of living, he called me forward from the pages of the books, away from the blinders that faith can surreptitiously place upon your eyes and out into a world populated by those who live their lives in the shadow of necessary fictions.

    Only 3 in stock.

$28.00

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Books
Red Rooms
Author: Cherie Dimaline
Traditional Territory: Métis, Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • Red Rooms is a unique journey articulating the lives of the Native patrons of an urban hotel as seen through the eyes of the hotels cleaning lady. The characters face the crises in their lives in ways that are easily identifiable and not uncommon to Native people. What is unique about this collection of stories is Dimaline's sometimes cryptic, sometimes comedic, always compassionate and visionary housekeeper who offers hindsight, insight and foresight to the reader in the representation of their lives."Haunting and complex Red Rooms is the Native Rosetta Stone. A lovely tour de force from an up-and-coming writer to watch."Eden Robinson

$19.95

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Books
Wenjack
Author: Joseph Boyden
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
  • The acclaimed author of The Orenda gives us a powerful and poignant look into the last moments of Charlie Wenjack, a residential school runaway trying to find his way home.

    An Ojibwe boy runs away from a North Ontario Indian School. Too late, he realizes just how far away home is. Along the way he's followed by Manitous, spirits of the forest who comment on his plight, cajoling, taunting, and ultimately offering him a type of comfort on his difficult journey back to the place he was so brutally removed from.

$12.00

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Books
Embers: One Ojibway's Meditations
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • "Life sometimes is hard. There are challenges. There are difficulties. There is pain. As a younger man I sought to avoid them and only ever caused myself more of the same. These days I choose to face life head on--and I have become a comet. I arc across the sky of my life and the harder times are the friction that lets the worn and tired bits drop away. It's a good way to travel; eventually I will wear away all resistance until all there is left of me is light. I can live towards that end."

    --Richard Wagamese, Embers

    In this carefully curated selection of everyday reflections, Richard Wagamese finds lessons in both the mundane and sublime as he muses on the universe, drawing inspiration from working in the bush--sawing and cutting and stacking wood for winter as well as the smudge ceremony to bring him closer to the Creator. Embers is perhaps Richard Wagamese's most personal volume to date. Honest, evocative and articulate, he explores the various manifestations of grief, joy, recovery, beauty, gratitude, physicality and spirituality--concepts many find hard to express. But for Wagamese, spirituality is multifaceted. Within these pages, readers will find hard-won and concrete wisdom on how to feel the joy in the everyday things. Wagamese does not seek to be a teacher or guru, but these observations made along his own journey to become, as he says, "a spiritual bad-ass," make inspiring reading.

$18.95

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Books
Take Us To Your Chief
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • A forgotten Haudenosaunee social song beams into the cosmos like a homing beacon for interstellar visitors. A computer learns to feel sadness and grief from the history of atrocities committed against First Nations. A young Native man discovers the secret to time travel in ancient petroglyphs. Drawing inspiration from science fiction legends like Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov and Ray Bradbury, Drew Hayden Taylor frames classic science-fiction tropes in an Aboriginal perspective.

    The nine stories in this collection span all traditional topics of science fiction--from peaceful aliens to hostile invaders; from space travel to time travel; from government conspiracies to connections across generations. Yet Taylor's First Nations perspective draws fresh parallels, likening the cultural implications of alien contact to those of the arrival of Europeans in the Americas, or highlighting the impossibility of remaining a "good Native" in such an unnatural situation as a space mission.

    Infused with Native stories and variously mysterious, magical and humorous, Take Us to Your Chief is the perfect mesh of nostalgically 1950s-esque science fiction with modern First Nations discourse.

$18.95

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Teen Books
Fire Starters
Author: Jennifer Storm
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • Looking for a little mischief after finding an old flare gun, Ron and Ben suddenly find themselves in trouble when the local gas bar on Agamiing Reserve goes up in flames, and they are wrongly accused of arson by the sheriff’s son. As the investigation goes forward, community attitudes are revealed, and the truth slowly comes to light.

$18.95

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Books
Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern City
Author: Tanya Talaga
Traditional Territory: Ojibway
Format: Paperback
  • In 1966, twelve-year-old Chanie Wenjack froze to death on the railway tracks after running away from residential school. An inquest was called and four recommendations were made to prevent another tragedy. None of those recommendations were applied.

    More than a quarter of a century later, from 2000 to 2011, seven Indigenous high school students died in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The seven were hundreds of miles away from their families, forced to leave home and live in a foreign and unwelcoming city. Five were found dead in the rivers surrounding Lake Superior, below a sacred Indigenous site. Jordan Wabasse, a gentle boy and star hockey player, disappeared into the minus twenty degrees Celsius night. The body of celebrated artist Norval Morrisseau’s grandson, Kyle, was pulled from a river, as was Curran Strang’s. Robyn Harper died in her boarding-house hallway and Paul Panacheese inexplicably collapsed on his kitchen floor. Reggie Bushie’s death finally prompted an inquest, seven years after the discovery of Jethro Anderson, the first boy whose body was found in the water.

    Using a sweeping narrative focusing on the lives of the students, award-winning investigative journalist Tanya Talaga delves into the history of this small northern city that has come to manifest Canada’s long struggle with human rights violations against Indigenous communities.

    A portion of each sale of Seven Fallen Feathers will go to the Dennis Franklin Cromarty Memorial Fund, set up in 1994 to financially assist Nishnawbe Aski Nation students’ studies in Thunder Bay and at post-secondary institutions.

Authentic Canadian Content
$22.95

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