Literacy

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10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know
Authors:
Jeff Anderson
Format: Paperback
Whether writing a blog entry or a high-stakes essay, fiction or nonfiction, short story or argument, students need to know certain essentials in order to write effectively. This straightforward book focuses on developing concepts and application of ten key aspects of good writing -- motio, models, focus, detail, form, frames, cohesion, energy, words, and clutter. It provides dozens of strong model texts, both fiction and nonfiction, that will help young writers learn what is possible, and experiment with the strategies professional writers use. The book also provides mini-lessons, mentor texts, writing process strategies, and classroom tips that will motivate students to confidently and competently take on any writing task.

Coming in October 2011!
$32.95

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100 Days of Cree
Content Territory: Cree
Format: Paperback

As an Elder once said, "Learn one Cree word a day for 100 days, and emerge a different person."

In 100 Days of Cree, Neal McLeod offers us a portal into another way of understanding the universe--and our place within it--while demonstrating why this funny, vibrant, and sometimes salacious language is "the sexiest of them all" (according to Tomson Highway).

Based on a series of Facebook posts, the 100 short chapters or "days" in the book present a chain of related words, some dealing with the traditional--the buffalo hunt, the seasons--and others cheekily capturing the detritus of modern life--from Internet slang to Johnny Cash songs to Viagra.

The result is both an introduction to the most widely spoken Indigenous language in Canada and the opportunity to see the world, and ourselves, in another way.

Reviews
"The nonfiction book is divided into 100 themes and offers Cree words and English explanations for everything from traditional subjects such as powwows and medicine to modern subjects such as Facebook and Star Wars. It also includes a guide to pronunciation written by Arok Wolvengrey, a linguist and the author of a Cree-English dictionary. 'When we think about indigenous languages, there’s a part of us that thinks they’re dying languages, ' URP publisher Bruce Walsh said. 'And then this manuscript comes in that demonstrates a living, vital language.' McLeod said that he and Wolvengrey worked to keep a balance between traditional usage and modern adaptations. 'To revitalize our languages, we have to do two things: we have to document the classical terminology, because within that terminology are all of our metaphors and idioms; but we also have to think of how to put old words together, to coin words, to describe the contemporary world.'" — Laura Godfrey, Publishers Weekly

Additional Information
325 pages | 5.50" x 7.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$24.95

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Aaniiih/Gros Ventre Stories
Format: Paperback

The first-ever collection of Anniiih/Gros Ventre narratives to be published in the Aaniiih/Gros Ventre language, this book contains traditional trickster tales and war stories. Some of these stories were collected by Alfred Kroeber in 1901, while others are contemporary, oral stories, told in the past few years. 

As with the previous titles in the First Nations Language Readers series, Aaniiih/Gros Ventre Stories comes with a complete glossary and provides some grammar usage. Delightfully illustrated, each story is accompanied by an introduction to guide the reader through the material.

The Aaniiih/Gros Ventre people lived in the Saskatchewan area in the 1700s, before being driven south during the 1800s to the Milk River area in Montana, along the USA/Canada border.

Educator Information
This book is published in the Aaniiih/Gros Ventre language. An English glossary is provided at the back of the book. Aaniiih/Gros Ventre Stories is part of the First Nations Language Readers series. With a mix of traditional and new stories, each First Nations Language Reader introduces an Indigenous language and demonstrates how each language is used today. The University of Regina Press’s long-term goal is to publish all 60+ Indigenous languages of Canada.

Additional Information
120 pages | 5.50" x 8.50" | Compiled and Edited by Terry Brockie and Andrew Cowell
 

Authentic Indigenous Text
$24.95

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Burning Brightly
Authors:
Kay Stone
Format: Paperback
Burning Brightly is the first full-length book treatment of professional storytelling in North America today. For some years there has been a major storytelling revival throughout the continent, with hundreds of local groups and centres springing up, and with storytelling becoming an important part of the professional training for librarians.

In the book, Stone explores storytelling through storytellers themselves, while providing enlightening commentary from her own background as a storyteller. Included in her analysis are informative discussions of organized storytelling communities, individual tellers, and tales. Issues such as the modern recontextualization of old tales and the role of women in folktales are linked to individual storytelling accounts. Texts of eight stories that exemplify the approaches of the various storytellers are also included.

Burning Brightly will be compelling reading for storytellers—and for everyone who loves storytelling.

Only 2 copies available.
$22.00

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Cree: Words (2 Volume Set)
Authors:
Arok Wolvengrey
Format: Paperback
This two-volume Cree dictionary documents the Cree language. It provides both a guide to its spoken form for non-speakers and a guide to its written forms (both SRO and Syllabics) for speakers and non-speakers alike. The goal has thus been to collect the vocabulary of Cree as it is spoken by fluent speakers in much of western Canada, whether elders or young people. The words recorded herein have been gathered from diverse sources, including elicitation, recorded conversations and narrative, and publications of many kinds.
$69.95

In Re-Print
Dictionary of Word Origins: The Histories of More Than 8,000 English-Language Words
Authors:
John Ayto
Format: Paperback
What is the link between map and apron, acrobat and oxygen, zeal and jealousy, flour and pollen, secret and crime? Did you know that crimson originally comes from the name of tiny scale insects, the kermes, from whose dried bodies a red dyestuff is made? That Yankee began as a nickname for Dutchmen? That omelette evolved from amulette, a thin sheet of metal, and is a not-too- distant cousin of the word laminate? That jeans find their antecedent in jean fustian, meaning a cotton fabric from Genoa? The Dictionary of Word Origins uncovers the hidden and often surprising connection between words. Written in a clear and informative style, the more than 8,000 articles reveal the origins of and links between some of the most common English-language words. They also contain an extensive selection of words whose life histories are intrinsically fascinating or instructive. This dictionary shows how modern English has developed from its Indo-European roots and how the various influences on the language from migration and invasion to exploration, trade, technology, and scholarship have intermingled. It is an invaluable addition to any English or linguistics library.
$19.95

In Re-Print
Elements of Indigenous Style: A Guide for Writing By and About Indigenous Peoples
Authors:
Gregory Younging
Format: Paperback
Elements of Indigenous Style offers Indigenous writers and editors—and everyone creating works about Indigenous Peoples—the first published guide to common questions and issues of style and process. Everyone working in words or other media needs to read this important new reference, and to keep it nearby while they’re working.

This guide features:

• Twenty-two succinct style principles.
• Advice on culturally appropriate publishing practices, including how to collaborate with Indigenous Peoples, when and how to seek the advice of Elders, and how to respect Indigenous Oral Traditions and Traditional Knowledge.
• Terminology to use and to avoid.
• Advice on specific editing issues, such as biased language, capitalization, and quoting from historical sources and archives.
• Case studies of projects that illustrate best practices.

Reviews
"Style is fraught with politics, especially when writing about Indigenous Peoples. Now, writers, academics, journalists, publishers, and students can breathe a sigh of relief. Reach for this essential Indigenous style guide, not only when searching for the right word, but when seeking guidance on the importance of relationships and trust." - Duncan McCue, CBC Radio Host and author of The Shoe Boy

"Elements of Indigenous Style is a beautiful beginning, a gathering place and a cultivator of both discussion and growth. Younging’s work clears the ground, drafts the blueprints and starts the framing out on the house that we need for our stories. At the same time, Younging manages to write both solid and grounded guidelines while leaving malleability in the architecture so that the ideas can grow and evolve. And we are all invited to share, discuss, add to, and cultivate this important work." - Cherie Dimaline, author and winner of the Governor General’s Literary Award

Educator Information
This book would be useful for the following courses and/or areas of studies: Indigenous Studies, Canadian Literature, Language Arts, English, Media Studies, Education, Journalism, Editing and Proofreading, Social Science/Ethnic Studies, and Composition and Creative Writing.

Additional Information
168 pages | 5.50" x 7.50"
Authentic Canadian Content
$19.95

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From the Iron House: Imprisonment in First Nations Writing
Authors:
Deena Rymhs
Format: Hardcover
In From the Iron House: Imprisonment in First Nations Writing, Deena Rymhs identifies continuities between the residential school and the prison, offering ways of reading “the carceral”—that is, the different ways that incarceration is constituted and articulated in contemporary Aboriginal literature. Addressing the work of writers like Tomson Highway and Basil Johnston along with that of lesser-known authors writing in prison serials and underground publications, this book emphasizes the literary and political strategies these authors use to resist the containment of their institutions.

The first part of the book considers a diverse sample of writing from prison serials, prisoners’ anthologies, and individual autobiographies, including Stolen Life by Rudy Wiebe and Yvonne Johnson, to show how these works serve as second hearings for their authors—an opportunity to respond to the law’s authority over their personal and public identities while making a plea to a wider audience. The second part looks at residential school narratives and shows how the authors construct identities for themselves in ways that defy the institution’s control. The interactions between these two bodies of writing—residential school accounts and prison narratives—invite recognition of the ways that guilt is colonially constructed and how these authors use their writing to distance themselves from that guilt.

Offering new ways of reading Native writing, From the Iron House is a pioneering study of prison literature in Canada and situates its readings within international criticism of prison writing. Contributing to genre studies and theoretical understandings of life writing, and covering a variety of social topics, this work will be relevant to readers interested in indigenous studies, Canadian cultural studies, postcolonial studies, auto/biography studies, law, and public policy.
$65.00

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Glimpses of Oneida Life
Content Territory: Oneida
Format: Paperback

Glimpses of Oneida Life is a remarkable compilation of modern stories of community life at the Oneida Nation of the Thames Settlement and the surrounding area. With topics ranging from work experiences and Oneida customs to pranks, humorous encounters, and ghost stories, these fifty-two unscripted narrations and conversations in Oneida represent a rare collection of first-hand Iroquoian reflections on aspects of daily life and culture not found in print elsewhere.

Each text is presented in Oneida with both an interlinear, word-by-word translation and a more colloquial translation in English. The book also contains a grammatical sketch of the Oneida language by Karin Michelson, co-author of the Oneida-English/English-Oneida Dictionary, that describes how words are structured and combined into larger linguistic structures, thus allowing Glimpses to be used as a teaching text as well.

The engrossing tales in Glimpses of Oneida Life will be a valuable resource for linguists and language learners, a useful source for those studying the history and culture of Iroquois people in the twentieth-century, and an entertaining read for anyone interested in everyday First Nations life in southern Ontario.

Additional Information
472 pages | 6.97" x 10.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$49.95

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Him Standing
Authors:
Richard Wagamese (Ojibway)
Content Territory: Ojibway
Format: Paperback
When Lucas Smoke learns the Ojibway art of carving from his grandfather, he proves to be a natural. He can literally make people come to life in wood. Then Lucas's growing reputation attracts a mysterious stranger, who offers him a large advance to carve a spirit mask.
This mask is to represent the master, but Lucas must find its face in his dreams. As his dreams become more and more disturbing, he feels himself changing. And the mask takes control of his life. Then a chance encounter with an old woman introduces him to the identity of the master. He is an ancient sorcerer named Him Standing, a powerful and dark wizard. The more Lucas works on the mask, the closer Him Standing comes to emerging from the dream world to walk the earth again. What follows is a race against time and the forces of evil in this supernatural thriller.
$9.95

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How To Tell a Legend
Authors:
Janet Stone
Format: Paperback
A legend is a story about a hero, a people, or a natural phenomena. Popular legends include King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, Blackbeard, and Robin Hood. This exciting new title teaches readers about the common characteristics found in legends from around the world. Engaging writing activities guide readers as they use these characteristics to create their own legends.
$9.95

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How To Tell a Myth
Authors:
Robert Walker
Format: Paperback
A myth is a story that attempts to explain a natural phenomena—such as how the world was created. Myths often include supernatural characters who have extraordinary powers. How To Tell a Myth is an engaging title that introduces readers to myths from around the world and highlights the common elements that make up this genre. Step-by-step instructions help readers create their own myths.
$9.95

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Indigenous Storywork
Content Territory: Coast Salish, Indigenous Canadian, Sto:lo
Format: Paperback
Jo-ann Archibald worked closely with Coast Salish Elders and storytellers, who shared both traditional and personal life-experience stories, in order to develop ways of bringing storytelling into educational contexts. Indigenous Storywork is the result of this research and it demonstrates how stories have the power to educate and heal the heart, mind, body, and spirit. It builds on the seven principles of respect, responsibility, reciprocity, reverence, holism, interrelatedness, and synergy that form a framework for understanding the characteristics of stories, appreciating the process of storytelling, establishing a receptive learning context, and engaging in holistic meaning-making.
$43.95

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Inuinnaqtun English Dictionary
Authors:
Gwen Angulalik
Format: Paperback

The only Inuinnaqtun-language dictionary in Canada, this indispensible reference compiles nearly two thousand terms in Inuinnaqtun and English. With definitions and terms in both languages, this dictionary will be a reliable resource for both native speakers of, and newcomers to, the language of the Kitikmeot region of Nunavut.

Originally published in 1996, this version has been revised and updated by the original editor.

$24.95

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Love You to Death
Authors:
Gail Bowen
Format: Paperback
Charlie D is the host of a successful late-night radio call-in show. His listeners have a particularly intimate relationship with him and often reveal much about themselves, confident that he will honor their trust and that he can save them. In their minds, he is perfect: one of life's winners. But Charlie feels he's something of a fake. His easy confidence on-air belies the reality for a man born with a wine-colored birthmark that covers half his face. Love You to Death covers one hour on ""The World According to Charlie D""--an hour during which he must both discover the long-time listener who is killing the people who trust him and attempt to come to terms with the man behind the birthmark.
$9.95

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