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Dah Dẕāhge Esigits: We Write Our Language
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Tahltan (Nahanni);
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

This beautifully illustrated book teaches the language of the Tahltan nation. The Tahltan alphabet is featured with the 47 sounds of the Tahltan language. Learners can match vowels, consonants and sounds to English equivalents and symbols. It is a resource for those who can already speak Tahltan, but wish to learn to read and write as well.

From the Preface:
The (Tahltan) Alphabet was developed by linguist Colin Carter in consultation with Tahltan speakers, Elders and language instructors...The (Tahltan) Alphabet...is phonetic, which means that every Tahltan sound is written with consistent symbols. This is different from the English alphabet where sounds can be written with various letters and combinations of them. The Tahltan alphabet is a summation of the 47 sounds of the Tahltan language. Carter and the Tahltan consultants decided to use English letters and represent specialized Tahltan sounds with more than one letter (eg dz, tl, ch) and other markings such as underlining, apostrophe and macron.

Educator Information
Recommended for Grades K-7 English Language Arts and courses in Indigenous language learning.

This book was coordinated by Edosdi Dr. Judy Thompson, developed by language leaders Angela Dennis, Regina Louis and Odelia Dennis, and illustrated by Una-Ann Moyer, Perer Morin and Tsema Igharas. The Telegraph Creek / Dease Lake dialect was contributed by Dah Dzahge Nodeside chair, Hostelma Pauline Hawkins in collaboration with fluent speakers Margery Inkster and Janet Vance from Telegraph Creek, BC. This book is produced with the intention to inspire future generations of Tahltan speakers and aid in Tahltan cultural sustainability.

Dr. Judy Thompson is an Assistant Professor in First Nations Studies at the University of Northern BC. Odelia Dennis teaches Tahltan as a second language to adults through the University of Victoria's Diploma in Indigenous Language Revitalization Program.

Additional Information
108 pages | 9.00" x 8.50" | colour and b&w drawings

 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$19.95

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Dam Builders: The Natural History of Beavers and their Ponds
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Few animals in the world are as famous or as infamous as the beaver, and none save our species has the ability to so dramatically transform its environment.

Beavers are remarkable animals. They have teeth that self-sharpen and never stop growing, and a heart that slows down and valves that close in their ears and noses when they dive. Their tail is the most multi-purpose of any animal on this planet; in addition to communication its many functions include serving as an air conditioner in summer and a food pantry in winter.

From mighty moose that glean sodium from aquatic plants to swallows that live in drowned trees and tiny butterflies that nectar in meadows where a pond once stood, myriad organisms benefit from the actions of beavers.

This book is a comprehensive overview of the lives of beavers and the habitats that arise from their actions. It is a visual extravaganza: approximately 400 photographs provide intimate insights into the lives of beavers and the inhabitants of their ponds and related habitats. Many new observations and rarely seen moments - such as beavers fighting - are documented in it.

Awards
Finalist for the 2015 Lane Anderson Award for the Best in Canadian Science Writing - Adult category

Reviews
"This book is a comprehensive overview of the lives of beavers and the habitats that arise from their actions. It is a visual extravaganza: approximately 400 photographs provide intimate insights into the lives of beavers and the inhabitants of their ponds and related habitats. Many new observations and rarely seen moments — such as beavers fighting — are documented in it. — Canada's History Magazine

"With stunning photographs throughout, this extraordinary book may seem more suited for the coffee table than an academic bookshelf. But the photographs do more than simply illustrate the text—they tell the story of beavers visually and powerfully, bearing witness to engineering marvels that result in complex ecosystems that benefit both beavers and other species. The accompanying text, admittedly sparse relative to the photographs, is just as important and earns the book respect as an academic resource. Runtz acknowledges that he is a naturalist, not a research biologist. But his bias as a naturalist who admires the beaver for its ecological role and skill for altering the landscape does not lessen the volume's value, which is a "blend of gleanings from ... scientific literature" and Runtz's personal observations. The familiar tone of the prose draws readers into beavers' watery world. Dozens of other species—birds, reptiles, amphibians, invertebrates, mammals, flora—are considered as co-inhabitants of beaver constructed ecosystems, and the author examines beavers' impact on the human built world. Highly recommended" — Choice Magazine

Educator Information
This image-heavy book (approximately 400 photographs) has sparse but informative text and is geared towards adults. However, the wide range of photographs and information on beavers could be useful for classroom studies of beavers.

Additional Information
330 pages | 10.50" x 10.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$45.00

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Damming the Peace: The Hidden Costs of the Site C Dam
Editors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Since the 1970s, the Site C Dam in northeastern British Columbia's Peace River Valley has been touted by B.C. Hydro and successive governments as necessary to meet the province's increasing energy needs. With its enormous $10 billion price tag, the dam would be the largest public works project in BC history. It would be the third dam on the Peace River, and destroy traditional unceded territory belonging to Treaty 8 First Nations.

Following the last provincial election, the newly appointed NDP government called for a review of the project, but work on the dam continues. This comes after protests by aboriginal groups and landowners, several lawsuits against the government, and federal government intervention to let the dam go ahead. More recently, there has been a call from a United Nations panel to review how the dam will affect Indigenous land.

This book presents the independent voices of citizen experts describing every important impact of the dam, including:

  • Sustainable energy expert Guy Dauncey on future energy demand, and whether there is likely to be a need for the dam's electricity
  • An interview with aboriginal activist Helen Knott on the dam's assault on traditional lands and culture, in particular Indigenous women
  • Agrologist Wendy Holm on the farm land impact — prime horticulture land important to food security and nutrition
  • Family physician Warren Bell on the effect that loss of traditional way of life and connection to the land has had on the health of aboriginal people
  • Wildlife biologist Brian Churchill with forty years' experience of studying its land and wildlife
  • Former environmental minister Joan Sawicki on government cover-ups and smoking guns
  • Energy industry watchdog Andrew Nikiforuk on the links between dams, fracking and earthquakes
  • Award-winning broadcaster Rafe Mair on how party politics corrupts political leadership, and the role of activism and civil disobedience in shaping government decision-making
  • David Schindler, one of the world's foremost water ecologists, explains the role dams like Site C will play in Canada's climate change strategy
  • Joyce Nelson connects the dots between the Site C dam and continental water sharing plans

Reviews
"Wendy Holm brings another perspective to the case against Site C, that of the production of crops." — Nelson Star, January 2018

"A massive, $10 billion hydroelectric dam project on British Columbia’s Peace River could threaten the First Nations peoples who live nearby. This volume dives deep into the potential impacts and decades of governmental cover-ups related to this long-planned project."— John R. Platt, The Revelator, April 2018

"This book provides an organized and rigorous “how to” guide on the intellectual and fact-based opposition to Site C, and in doing this becomes a great model for a book on any long-term protest. Its ambition is to inform on the subject from every possible angle, keeping the Peace River, the region and its people in mind, rather than the expediency of the business and government angle, which is usually given at least equal weight by the mainstream media." — Cathryn Atkinson, Rabble, June 2018

"There is an "elephant in the room" — not the huge white elephant that you see at No-Site C rallies. This elephant is dark and invisible. The government does not talk about it ... No. This elephant is rather more sinister. Wendy Holm confronts it and exposes it. It's about exporting water."— John Gellard, The Ormsby Review, August 2018

"Damming the Peace is an accessible, thoughtful and informative collection of essays that reveal the grave environmental, human and economic costs if the Site C dam is built."— Tim Pelzer, People's Voice, October 2018

Educator Information
Includes Indigenous content/perspectives and an Interview with Indigenous activist Helen Knott.

Additional Information
272 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
$22.95

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Dana Claxton
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Sioux; Lakota; Hunkpapa;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Known for her expansive multidisciplinary approach to art making Vancouver-based Dana Claxton, who is Hunkpapa Lakota (Sioux), has investigated notions of Indigenous identity, beauty, gender and the body, as well as broader social and political issues through a practice which encompasses photography, film, video and performance. Rooted in contemporary art strategies, her practice critiques the representations of Indigenous people that circulate in art, literature and popular culture in general. In doing so, Claxton regularly combines Lakota traditions with "Western" influences, using a powerful and emotive "mix, meld and mash" approach to address the oppressive legacies of colonialism and to articulate Indigenous world views, histories and spirituality. This timely catalogue is the first monograph to examine the full breadth and scope of Claxton's practice. It's extensively illustrated and includes essays by Claxton's colleague Jaleh Mansoor, Associate Professor in the Department of Art History, Visual Art & Theory at the University of British Columbia; Monika Kin Gagnon, Professor in the Communications Department at Concordia University, who has followed Claxton's work for 25 years; Olivia Michiko Gagnon, a New York-based scholar and doctoral student in Performance Studies; and Grant Arnold, Audain Curator of British Columbia Art at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Additional Information
160 pages | 9.08" x 10.60"

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$40.00

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Dancing on Our Turtle's Back
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

Many promote Reconciliation as a “new” way for Canada to relate to Indigenous Peoples. In Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence, and a New Emergence activist, editor, and educator Leanne Simpson asserts reconciliation must be grounded in political resurgence and must support the regeneration of Indigenous languages, oral cultures, and traditions of governance.

Simpson explores philosophies and pathways of regeneration, resurgence, and a new emergence through the Nishnaabeg language, Creation Stories, walks with Elders and children, celebrations and protests, and meditations on these experiences. She stresses the importance of illuminating Indigenous intellectual traditions to transform their relationship to the Canadian state.

Challenging and original, Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back provides a valuable new perspective on the struggles of Indigenous Peoples.

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$24.95

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Dancing With A Ghost
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

Rupert Ross, as a crown attorney, attempts to give some definition to the cultural gap that bedevils the relationships and distorts the communication between Native peoples and the dominant white Canadian society to encourage others to begin their own respectful cross-cultural explorations. As Ross discovered, traditional perspectives have a great deal to offer modern-day Canada.

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$24.00

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Dancing with the Wheel
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American;

The Native American philosophy behind the vision of the Medicine Wheel is that all things and beings on the earth are related and, therefore, must be in harmony for the earth to be balanced. Dancing with the Wheel teaches you how to apply this philosophy to your daily life through many practical exercises and ceremonies. These exercises will help you gain energy from the spirits, which can heal both humans and the earth.

Through Dancing with the Wheel, the second book specifically devoted to the Medicine Wheel, those familiar with this vision will gain an increased understanding of the wheel and its developments over the last ten years. Those new to the Medicine Wheel will be ushered into the teachings and technique of what has come to be a source of comfort and direction for thousands of people around the world. Whether you are in the middle of the wilderness or the middle of a city, this book and its exercises will help you center yourself and establish peace with the earth and other beings.

Authentic Indigenous Text
$33.00

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Dangerous Spirits: The Windigo in Myth and History
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;

In the traditional Algonquian world, the windigo is the spirit of selfishness, which can transform a person into a murderous cannibal. Native peoples over a vast stretch of North America—from Virginia in the south to Labrador in the north, from Nova Scotia in the east to Minnesota in the west—believed in the windigo, not only as a myth told in the darkness of winter, but also as a real danger.

Drawing on oral narratives, fur traders' journals, trial records, missionary accounts, and anthropologists’ field notes, this book is a revealing glimpse into indigenous beliefs, cross-cultural communication, and embryonic colonial relationships. It also ponders the recent resurgence of the windigo in popular culture and its changing meaning in a modern context.

$19.95

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Daniel Paul: Mi'kmaw Elder
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Born in a log cabin during a raging blizzard on Indian Brook Reserve in 1938, Mi'kmaw elder Daniel N. Paul rose to the top of a Canadian society that denied his people's civilization. When he was named to the Order of Canada, his citation called him a "powerful and passionate advocate for social justice and the eradication of racial discrimination." His Order of Nova Scotia honour said he "gives a voice to his people by revealing a past that the standard histories have chosen to ignore."

But long before the acclaim, there was the Indian Agent denying food to his begging mother. There was the education system that taught him his people were savages. There was the Department of Indian Affairs that frustrated his work to bring justice to his people.

His landmark book We Were Not the Savages exposed the brutalities of the collision between European and Native American civilizations from a Mi'kmaq perspective. The book sold tens of thousands of copies around the world and inspired others to learn history from an indigenous point of view.

He shone a light on Halifax founder Edward Cornwallis through newspaper columns and public debates over two decades, calling on Nova Scotia to stop honouring the man whose scalping proclamations were an act of genocide against the Mi'kmaq.

Now, for the first time, here is the full story of his personal journey of transformation, a story that will inspire Canadians to recognize and respect their First Nations as equal and enlightened civilizations.

Authentic Canadian Content
$19.95

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Daughters Are Forever
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Salish;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

This powerful novel about a woman's self-discovery reinforces Lee Maracle's stature as one of the most important First Nations writers in North America. The novel incorporates an innovative structure - one based on Salish Nation storytelling - to depict the transformation of Marilyn, a First Nations woman who is alienated from her culture, her family, and herself. By discovering her own culture's ways and listening to the natural world, Marilyn begins to heal her deep-rooted hurt and gradually becomes reconciled with her estranged daughters. Here is a moving work about First Nations people in the modern world, and the importance of courage, truth, and reconciliation.

Additional Information
206 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

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Daylight in the Swamp: Memoirs of Selwyn Dewdney
Authors:
Editors:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

Daylight in the Swamp is the bush memoirs of Selwyn Dewdney, a noted Canadian artist and recorder of native rock art. His two great loves, art and the Canadian north, come together in this book. His respect for native culture and art is reflected in his own work, his insight into native rock art, and his passion for canoeing and the northern experience.

The third theme of the book is history spanning the period from 1910 through to the 1970s during which the old north largely vanished. Dewdney was there to record the images of forgotten dreams painted on rocks and cliffs throughout the Canadian Shield.

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$29.99

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De Temps Immemorial: Les Premiers Habitants de la Côte Nord-Ouest du Pacifique
Format: Paperback

From Time Immemorial provides an honest and up-to-date survey of the history of the coastal First Nations from pre-contact to the present. The culture of the coastal people was highly complex. Although there were many similarities, there were also many differences among the groups who shared the wealth of their life-sustaining environment.

This book provides a broad overview of traditional ways common to a large number of diverse groups. It encourages readers to learn more about particular groups who, long ago, walked the shorelines and forest trails of the Pacific Northwest.

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$27.95

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Deaf Heaven
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Poetry that takes us inside present-day First Nations reality to reveal the wounds of history and the possible healing to come.

As the title suggests, this new collection of poetry from Garry Gottfriedson of the Secwepemc (Shuswap) Nation deals with the ways in which the world is deaf to the problems First Nations people face in Canada today.

Follow Garry Gottfriedson in this new collection of combative poems as he compels us and Heaven to listen to the challenges facing First Nation communities today. Employing many of the Secwepemc (Shuswap) images and stories, Gottfriedson takes us inside the rez and into the rooming houses in the city cores, but always drawing new strength from the land and the people who have moved upon it. He speaks of “the smell of grandmothers and grandfathers / breathing the stories into our blood” so as to “wrap our newborn in freshly made Star Quilts.”

Gottfriedson examines such issues as the Truth and Reconciliation movements as well as the missing and murdered Aboriginal women. The poems focus not only on postcolonial issues but also on First Nations internal problems. Although the book speaks of age-old themes, it explores them through fresh modern eyes offering thought-provoking and engaging prespectives. Eloquent and witty, these poems are power-packed with imagery that uncovers the raw politics of race. There is nothing polite about them. While frequently offering a bleak view of present-day First Nation conditions, the poems also provide a sense of optimism: "the hope/that the coldest day in winter/will promise serenity in spring."

Reviews
“Gottfriedson’s poetry is built to endure and it will remain with you long after this book is closed.” – Alexander MacLeod, author of Light Lifting, finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize

“Garry Gottfriedson rides double, calling out the violence and corruption he’s seen, while reminding us that grounded strength comes from staying connected to grandmothers, grandfathers, horses, and the land.” – Rita Wong, author of Forage, winner of the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize

“Gottfriedson writes us the sound of his blood, the splatter of ink on wood, and the dripping sweat and tears of prayer — all of it telling us who we are and chanting, as if in chorus, ‘survival is brilliant.’ Will we be wise or strong enough to listen?” – Shane Rhodes, author of X: Poems & Anti-Poems

Educator Information
This book of poetry would be useful for Indigenous Studies courses or literature courses such as Indigenous Literatures, Canadian Literature, and Creative Writing.

Additional Information
100 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
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$15.95

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Dear Blue Sky
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8;

A timely, eye-opening novel showing how war affects families on both sides

Ever since her brother Sef left for Iraq, Cassie has felt like her life is falling apart. Her parents are fighting over her brother having gone to war. Her smart, beautiful sister is messing up. Her little brother, who has Down syndrome, is pretending he's a Marine. And her best friend no longer has time for her. In her loneliness Cassie turns to a surprising source of comfort: Blue Sky, an Iraqi girl she meets through her blog. The girls begin a correspondence and Cassie learns that when Blue Sky says "I want my life back," she means something profound, as she can no longer venture out in her destroyed city. Cassie takes strength from Blue Sky's courage and is inspired to stop running away from the pain, and to reclaim her life.

$7.99

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Décoloniser le Canada: 50 ans de militantisme autochtone
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

« Je ne souhaite pas célébrer un Canada qui vole nos terres. » C’est en ces termes que s’exprimait Arthur Manuel à la veille du début des célébrations autour du 150e anniversaire de la Confédération canadienne, quelque temps avant de rendre l’âme le 17 janvier 2017. Ce cri du coeur d’une des figures les plus importantes du réveil militant autochtone des 50 dernières années illustre à merveille ce que ce mouvement cherche à nous rappeler quotidiennement : il est temps d’en finir avec la nature coloniale de l’État canadien.Fruit d’une collaboration unique entre deux grands leaders et défenseurs des droits des Premières Nations, soit Arthur Manuel, militant et intellectuel de la nation Secwepemc, et le Grand Chef Ron Derrickson, six fois élu chef de bande de Westbank et un des entrepreneurs autochtones les plus prospères et respectés au pays, Décoloniser le Canada est d’abord le récit de cinquante ans de militantisme autochtone. Cinquante années pendant lesquelles nous avons assistées au réveil autochtone venu rappeler le triste sort réservé aux descendants des premiers habitants de ce pays.Dans ce récit narré au je par Arthur Manuel, un des plus réputés et ardents défenseurs de la cause autochtone sur les scènes nationale et internationale, on revient sur son parcours qui fut étroitement lié à ce que l’auteur et essayiste John Saul a qualifié de « grand retour » des Autochtones et de leurs luttes sur la scène politique. Récit qui retrace le parcours personnel et militant de Manuel, c’est aussi le portrait du renouveau des mouvements de lutte autochtone au pays depuis les années 1970. De la Paix des Braves à la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, en passant par le rapatriement de la Constitution en 1982, la crise d’Oka ou les importants jugements de la Cour suprême ayant considérablement renforcé les revendications des peuples autochtones, on y revisite de grands pans de l’histoire canadienne des cinquante dernières années. Ouvrage de vulgarisation historique écrit dans une langue vivante et accessible, il est la porte d’entrée idéale pour quiconque souhaite s’ouvrir aux réalités autochtones, mais aussi revisiter notre passé récent.Ce livre sage, éclairant et tout à fait accessible ne peut que renforcer et approfondir notre compréhension des questions autochtones. Comme le résume bien Naomi Klein dans sa préface : « Entremêlant l’histoire et la politique aux récits personnels d’une famille haute en couleur, truffée de chefs et de guérisseurs, Arthur Manuel propose un tableau unique du douloureux parcours qui nous a conduits au contexte actuel. Son livre offre également un cours intensif sur les notions juridiques et les droits fondamentaux qui seront de précieux outils dans notre marche commune. »

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$30.00

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