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The Five Legends: A Journey to Heal Divided Hearts
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Drawing on 30 years of helping families, this profound fable by the Anasazi Foundation illustrates the true anguish of conflict and explains how we can end war within ourselves, within our families, and even between nations.

Created in 1988 by renowned wilderness pioneers Larry D. Olsen and Ezekiel C. Sanchez (a Totonac Indian whose native name is Good Buffalo Eagle), the Anasazi Foundation invites young people, through a primitive living experience, to effect a change of heart. For over thirty years, their teachings have helped families begin anew and walk in harmony in the wilderness of the world.

Inspired by their wisdom, this book tells the story of two brothers whose warring hearts threaten to destroy their lives and their community. Trapped in a canyon, the two brothers are rescued by a mysterious old man who perceives their need for peace. He offers to guide them home -- inviting them to open their hearts toward a New Beginning. When they agree, he teaches them the five legends of peace. And as they walk forward, they learn that we are free to create peace in our own lives--and how to do it. This discovery saves not only the brothers but ultimately their people. This poetic narrative offers us all a hopeful way out of the canyons of war, leaving behind the warring within.

This poetic and moving allegory is written for all ages. Its message is both timeless and desperately needed for our own time.

Reviews
“As the ANASAZI program grew, I put my efforts into developing a companion program to include parents and families in the powerful principles their children were learning on the trail. ANASAZI is not just our vision—it is the Creator's work. The Five Legends is based on our work to help heal divided hearts." —Sherrel Olsen, Co-Founder Mother of ANASAZI Foundation

The Five Legends is a heartwarming book about peace and the power of family. I highly recommend it." —Steve Young, NFL Hall of Fame quarterback and ESPN commentator

“Having taught youth for over twenty years (some of whom were labeled ‘at-risk’), I can definitively say most youth are in need of a book like The Five Legends. This book is perfect for teenagers as it doesn’t come across as preachy but instead allows them to arrive at the principle on their own.” —Mark Rice, High School English Teacher

“A touching story of reconciliation, new beginnings, and shared humanity. Written from the heart for the heart.” —The Jenkins Family (Bruce, Shari and Aly), Friends of ANASAZI Foundation

“This book inspired me to be more understanding of others. It can be easy to find fault with our ‘brothers.’ The Creator is the path to love, harmony and forgiveness, and following that path allows us to live in the ‘WE’ world.” —Mike Tetmeyer, Retired Sr. Vice President of Marketing of Hy-Vee Food Stores

The Five Legends is a life-changing fable about a mother’s unconditional love and how seeing people truthfully can change everything.” —Ganel-Lyn Condie, Speaker and Bestselling Author

Additional Information
120 pages | 5.50" x 8.44"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$21.95

Quantity:
One Night
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 9; 10; 11; 12;

Luna Begay is as studious and serious about her Aboriginal heritage as her sister, Issy, is outgoing and fun. When Issy convinces Luna to go with her to a party full of rich kids, Luna is surprised to end up talking with Jon, who is charming, sophisticated, and very good-looking. But the night turns bad when Jon drugs and rapes Luna.

Feeling guilty and ashamed that she will be perceived as an "Indian slut," Luna doesn't tell anyone and remains in denial until Issy figures out that Luna is pregnant. Knowing that her decisions will affect her parents and Issy as much as her own future, Luna has to work out how to deal with the consequences of that one night, and she has to do it fast.

Reviews
"A hi-lo title that reads like a Lifetime made-for-TV movie. An adequate choice for struggling readers."— Tamara Saarinen, School Library Journal

"Melanie Florence's young adult novel One Night is a powerful read for all readers. Written for reluctant readers it will be read by readers at all levels... The author explores many issues — sexual abuse, bullying, teenage pregnancy, adoption, and rape. Melanie Florence's well-written and compassionate novel does not disappoint." — Keep Calm and Novel On, Educator and NetGalley Reviewer, 

"I adore Luna... She never begins to act out of character but she does grow throughout the novel ... Parents and other adults [are exactly as I would expect them to be. Realistically portrayed, they are at first shocked, then incredibly supportive of Luna. Her principal and teachers are understanding and concerned with her safety. I heaved a sigh of relief at this portrayal. I work at a public high school ... and I absolutely KNOW this is how it goes down there rather than the usual judgmental way portrayed in novels. (Although the students on the other hand can be brutal - also written in the novel.) Luna's parents were so fantastic. Concern for their daughter, getting her immediate medical care, discussing realistic options for after the baby is born, and supporting Luna the whole way are exactly how a parent SHOULD react. Writing adults as they are here could encourage girls to come forward about rape or pregnancy. THANK YOU MELANIE FLORENCE! ... The inclusion of so many contemporary issues (alcoholism, stereotyping, negative branding, rape, drinking, abortion, adoption, being roofied) makes it interesting and thought-provoking the whole way through." — Mandy Peterson, Librarian

"This book deals with some serious topics that are timely and are issues teens are facing. One Night touches on aspects of racism, stereotyping, bullying, drugs, rape, and Aboriginal heritage. It would be well-paired with some recent news articles or other non-fiction pieces on any of these topics."— Chasity Findlay,, CM Magazine

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the SideStreets series. SideStreets are edgy, fast-paced novels that combine real-world themes and believable characters to make for short, heart-stopping books — sure to engage the most reluctant reader.

Interest age: From 14 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 2.9
Lexile Reading Level: HL560L

Additional Information
192 pages | 4.25" x 7.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$9.95

Quantity:
Worthy of Love
Authors:
Andre Fenton
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 9; 10; 11; 12;

Adrian Carter is a young mixed-race teen struggling with poor self-image, but he's through with being bullied for his weight. Adrian decides to shed the pounds, no matter what it takes. When he meets and falls for Mel Woods, a confident and sensible girl with a passion for fitness, his motivation to change leads him to take dangerous measures. When Mel confronts Adrian about his methods of weight loss he is left trying to find a balance between the number on the scale and wondering if he'll ever be worthy of love.

Reviews
"Both Adrian and Melody are biracial, and they bond over both pride in their backgrounds and the prejudices they face (Adrian’s parents are both half black and half white, while Melody’s are white and Indigenous). The bully is white. Adrian is a highly sympathetic protagonist, showing sensitivity and emotional maturity that would outshine that of many adults" - Kirkus Review

"Through Carter and his struggles, Fenton explores deeper issues around masculinity and the role it plays in eating disorders, self-esteem and race." — Allison Lawlor, Chronicle Herald

"This story of a mixed-raced teen who struggles with his weight is the kind of refreshing storytelling we don't see enough of."— Sheree Fitch, CBC.ca

Educator Information
Hi/lo Fiction
Reading Level: Grades 3–5
Interest Level: Grades 9+

Additional Information
200 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$14.95

Quantity:
Deal with it before you are censored: Freedom of Expression
Authors:
Danielle S McLaughlin
Artists:
Paris Alleyne
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

Can you say anything you want? Should you?

Everyone has rights but navigating your rights can be difficult. You have the right to freedom of expression but there are many places where this freedom is limited by laws, rules and regulations, or even customs such as good manners.

By exploring the viewpoints of The Censor, The Speechmaker and The Witness, this book will help you navigate issues of how to express identity and opinion.
- Freedom of Expression 101 defines rights, freedom of expression and censorship
- Dear Conflict Counsellor offers real-life problems and solutions
- Quizzes test your ability to identify censorship and how to deal with issues around freedom of expression
- A resource guide puts helpful organizations, books and websites at your fingertips

Educator & Series Information
The Deal With It series helps adolescents cope with conflicts in everyday life and promote peaceful homes, schools, and communities.

Recommended Ages: 9-14
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 5.4
Lexile Reading Level: 800L

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$24.95

Coming Soon
Real Justice: Convicted for Being Mi'kmaq: The story of Donald Marshall Jr.
Authors:
Bill Swan
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

When a black teen was murdered in a Sydney, Cape Breton park late one night, his young companion, Donald Marshall Jr., became a prime suspect. Sydney police coached two teens to testify against Donald which helped convict him of a murder he did not commit. He spent 11 years in prison until he finally got a lucky break. Not only was he eventually acquitted of the crime, but a royal commission inquiry into his wrongful conviction found that a non-aboriginal youth would not have been convicted in the first place. Donald became a First Nations activist and later won a landmark court case in favour of native fishing rights. He was often referred to as the "reluctant hero" of the Mi'kmaq community.

Reviews
"Bill Swan presents a straightforward, compelling narrative, easily followed, that will astound today's teenagers." — Joan Marshall, Resource Links

"the important subject matter, meticulous research, and ultimately balanced portrait of the flawed man Marshall was makes this an engrossing and enlightening read for curious teens."— Todd Kyle, CM: Canadian Review of Materials

"Much of this disturbing but well-researched book is impressively drawn directly from court documents and is part of the valuable Real Justice series, which features wrongfully accused Canadian youth and their fight for freedom."— Booklist Online

Educator Information
Interest age: From 13 To 17
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 5.0
Lexile Reading Level: HL770L

Additional Information
184 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
Hoop Dreams
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Playing ball is what keeps Podium Sports Academy's basketball captain going when things get rough. When there's trouble back home, Allie turns to basketball. Ditto when her relationship is in trouble or when she's at odds with her friends. But then tragedy strikes when an old knee injury resurfaces and Allie is told she might not be able to play again. With her hope of a future as an elite basketball player gone, Allie is overwhelmed with dark thoughts and feels she has nothing left to live for. That is, until unexpected support comes from two unlikely sources: her folks back home and her friends at Podium, her home away from home.

Reviews
"I'm really impressed with the writing and character development. Dialogue is realistic, and the pacing is exciting. Will be recommending more from the Podium series." — Jaime Tong, Educator at Vancouver School Board

"Allie leads a cast of well-drawn, multicultural characters, some of whom have starred in other Podium books, giving a cohesive feel to this fictional high school. The action flows naturally, alternating between scenes of intense basketball action, solitary angst, and hanging with friends. Readers will identify with Allie’s struggles and second-guess her choices, making this a valuable and worthwhile read for all teens -- elite athletes or not. Gripping, relatable and fast-paced, these books will appeal to a wide-ranging audience, particularly to teens reading below age level."— Penny Draper, National Reading Campaign

"Hoop Dreams is the perfect book for my students who need a short novel to get them engaged in reading again."— Melissa S., Educator, NetGalley Reviewer

Educator & Series Information
The Podium Sports Academy series follows the lives of super-jocks at an elite high school as they train for a future in pro sports.

Interest age: From 13 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 2.9
Lexile Reading Level: HL550L

Additional Information
136 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$9.95

Quantity:
Big Air
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Aboriginal snowboarder Jax has it made. He's in his last year at Podium Sports Academy and he's got a sponsorship from a big snowboarding company in the bag. But then his older brother, always the troublemaker in the family, shows up in Calgary unexpectedly. Suddenly Jax's sponsorship is threatened when the police come asking questions about a break-in at the house where he lives. He wants to help his brother, but will it cost him his future as a professional boarder?

Reviews
"The series is designed to connect with teens by dramatically leading them through the possibilities their choices create and offering wholesome suggestions for successful outcomes. Author Lorna Schultz Nicholson achieves this without ever appearing to be preaching to the reader. Big Air is highly recommended for any teens, and the series should be available in all middle years school libraries." — Sherry Faller, CM: Canadian Review of Materials

"What gives this story its depth is the abiding hatred the prejudiced policeman holds for Jax. Jax sees just how easy it is for dangerous stereotypes to rule the day." Rated E: excellent, enduring, everyone should read it! — Lesley Little, Resource Links

Educator & Series Information
The Podium Sports Academy series follows the lives of super-jocks at an elite high school as they train for a future in pro sports.

Interest age: From 13 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 2.5
Lexile Reading Level: 580L

Additional Information
144 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$9.95

Quantity:
Epic Fail
Authors:
Cristy Watson
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

This book tells a tough but realistic story about teen relationships and sexual assault and how social media plays a role in magnifying its impact.

In suburban Vancouver, in a multiracial mixed-income neighbourhood, three 14-year-old friends, a boy and two girls, go to a party organized by the boy's older brother. One of the girls, who comes from a mixed-race Aboriginal/Caucasian family of lower socio-economic standing, is raped, which has very serious consequences on her mental health.

Two years later, photos of the crime and the victim show up on social media and the girl's friend decides to confirm the victim's account of her experience — and confirm that the assailant was his own brother's good buddy. His actions of first remaining silent, then finally speaking up, have unexpected consequences for everyone — including him.

This novel reflects the complexities that teens face dealing with the rape culture many young men participate in and how it is intensified by social media.

Reviews
"I love the Sidestreets series, and this book is no exception. It tackles a very difficult issue that is very relevant in today's society of social media and cell phones. It's a quick read, and very to the point, and it outlines the aftermath of the horrific event, and the healing, rather than the event itself. If you haven't read a Sidestreets book, I highly recommend it. It's a great series for teens, on very real issues, and it's Canadian!" — Bailey Randolph, Librarian, NetGalley

"This book opens the door to talk about rape culture and the way that women are allowed to navigate in the world of sexuality."— Isaiah Roby, NetGalley

"In addition to the diverse protagonists, many secondary characters also bring diversity to the series."— Kirkus Reviews

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the SideStreets series.  SideStreets are edgy, fast-paced novels that combine real-world themes and believable characters to make for short, heart-stopping books — sure to engage the most reluctant reader.

Interest age: From 13 To 18

Additional Information
176 pages | 5.25" x 7.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
Push Back
Authors:
Karen Spafford-Fitz
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Sixteen-year-old Zaine Wyatt has a lot to be angry about. His mother walked out of his life when he was 12, and he was kicked out of his Aunt Sarah's place by his uncle. After living on the streets and getting badly beaten up, he is back at Aunt Sarah's, but Zaine is still angry, afraid, and uncertain that he has a permanent place to live. When his mother breaks yet another promise to take him back, he flees to an empty art studio he has taken refuge in before. But now it is just a storage shed, and he vents his rage by trashing the place and injures the new owner as he flees.

Facing charges and a possible criminal record, Zaine agrees to participate in a restorative justice program to keep from being kicked out again by his aunt. Zaine works to fix the damage he has caused and helps the owner's disabled grandson Lucas get to and from school, but his attempts to stay on the right side of the law are challenged by a group of teens who want to recruit him into a gang. Can Zaine complete the restorative justice program and prove himself worthy of a home, whether with his mother or not?

Reviews
"The author deals knowledgeably with restorative justice in this book, as well as the procedural requirements of the criminal justice system. This adds another dimension to the story without complicating the narrative or diminishing any of the characters."— Resource Links

"Push Back is an engaging read that will offer opportunities for discussion of the justice system."— Ruth McMahon, Librarian, CM: Canadian Review of Materials 

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the SideStreets series. SideStreets are edgy, fast-paced novels that combine real-world themes and believable characters to make for short, heart-stopping books — sure to engage the most reluctant reader.

Themes: Law & Crime, Homelessness & Poverty, Bullying, Parents

Interest age: From 13 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 4.0
Lexile Reading Level: HL600L

Additional Information
184 pages | 5.25" x 7.50"  

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
Cold Grab
Authors:
Steven Barwin
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Sixteen-year-old Angelo has moved to Toronto from the Philippines to join his mother, who has been living and working in Canada for most of Angelo's life. Adjusting to a new country isn't easy for Angelo, with a new language, curfews, new rules, and pressure from a mom who seems like a stranger. Angelo's mother takes him to the Filipino Community Centre where he meets Marcus who has shared the same experience.

At school, Marcus introduces Angelo to Felix and Darius. The boys quickly give Angelo a reality check, pointing out how rich everyone else is, and how no one respects poor Filipino immigrants. They lure Angelo into running petty thefts as a way of proving his friendship. But when Angelo is accused of stealing something valuable from the house his mother cleans and she loses her job, he realizes that everyone sees him as just a punk. He wants to set things right, but how can he go against his friends without getting the law involved?

Reviews
"Cold Grab presents readers with one boy's experience in leaving behind a home he loves to join his mother in a new country. Readers journey with him as he struggles to find his place in this new-to-him world, and they can connect with the lessons Angelo learns and reflect upon the application of these lessons in their own lives."— CM: Canadian Review of Materials

"Author Steven Barwin's portrayal of adjusting to life and family in an unfamiliar environment and the perils it engenders is told in the straightforward terms we have come to associate with his sports novels. Barwin presents the clash of values and culture experienced by Angelo and how he works through it without sentiment or preaching, making a complex and nuanced situation accessible without diminishing its urgency."— Resource Links

Educator Information
This book is part of the SideStreets series. SideStreets are edgy, fast-paced novels that combine real-world themes and believable characters to make for short, heart-stopping books — sure to engage the most reluctant reader.

Themes: Law & Crime, Diversity & Multicultural, Assimilation, Peer Pressure

Interest age: From 13 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 3.3
Lexile Reading Level: HL560L

Additional Information
192 pages | 5.25" x 7.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
Girl Gang
Authors:
Nancy Miller
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

After her online mischief threatens her father's job, sixteen-year-old Sasha is eager to leave for Canada with her mother. She thinks she has found a new start in CREW (Confident, Remarkable, Excellent, Welcoming), a girls' volunteerism group at her new school. But she quickly learns that the group is a front for a girl gang — and their true philosophy is to Con, Rip Off, Exploit, and Weaken the people they claim to help. Their leader, Martha, who goes by the nickname Master, is eager to exploit Sasha's computer skills for a more lucrative level of crime: stealing identities and luring and blackmailing men online.

Afraid of being exposed for her role in the crimes, Sasha is forced to stay in CREW and follow Master's orders. But when she starts getting attention from Master's crush, Sasha finds herself in more danger than ever. With only her online wiles at her disposal, Sasha must use Master's hunger for power and fame against her and bring her down for good.

This story plays out against the backdrop of peer pressure and digital media, showing readers that fitting in with a powerful group isn't worth sacrificing your safety and integrity.

Reviews
"The story is captivating, moving, full of suspense and twists and turns."— Anthony Cherrier, NetGalley

"Gang Girl could certainly have a place in a classroom library ... The language is clear and simple for an emerging or struggling reader while the content is suitable for a more mature audience." — Allison Giggey, teacher-librarian, CM: Canadian Review of Materials

"In addition to the diverse protagonists, many secondary characters also bring diversity to the series."— Kirkus Reviews

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the SideStreets series.  SideStreets are edgy, fast-paced novels that combine real-world themes and believable characters to make for short, heart-stopping books — sure to engage the most reluctant reader.

Interest age: From 13 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 3.6
Lexile Reading Level: HL600L

Additional Information
176 pages | 5.25" x 7.50"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
Deal with it and be a gender transcender: Transphobia
Authors:
J Wallace Skelton
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7; 8;

Who do you think you are? Part of identity is how people experience their gender. Transphobia is intolerance of any part of the range of gender identity. This accessible, illustrated book offers information, quizzes, comics and true-to-life scenarios to help kids better understand gender identity and determine what they can do to identify and counter transphobia in their schools, homes and communities. Considered from the viewpoint of gender challengers, gender enforcers and witnesses, transphobic behavior is identified, examined and put into a context that kids can use to understand and accept themselves and others for whatever gender they are — even if that's no gender at all!

Reviews
"The book's content is incredibly (and sadly) relevant, and I think that … Transphobia: Deal With It is a necessary book for school libraries, classroom collections, and home use."— Rob Bittner, CM: Candian Review of Materials

"This is a great resource for educators in any English-speaking setting... The content is excellent, and is likely to inspire some positive discussion amongst young people who are not LGBTQIA and haven't had cause to consider how their behaviour/language impacts on others. It's also affirming for LGBTQIA students and offers some excellent guidance for everyone on how to deal with their own and other people's passive and aggressive non-binary/transphobia. As someone with 18 years' experience as a teacher/lecturer, I am happy to recommend this book, in particular as an educational resource for teachers, youth group leaders and parents." — Debbie McGowan, NetGalley

Educator & Series Information
The Deal With It series helps adolescents cope with conflicts in everyday life and promote peaceful homes, schools, and communities.

Fry Reading Level: 6.1

Recommended Ages: 9-13

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$24.95

Quantity:
Righting Canada's Wrongs: Africville: An African Nova Scotian Community Is Demolished - and Fights Back
Authors:
Gloria Ann Wesley
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

The community of Africville began in the early 1800s with the settlement of former American slaves and other black people on the Bedford Basin, just north of Halifax. Over time the community grew to include a church, a school, and small businesses. At its peak, about 400 people lived in the tight-knit community of Africville. But the neighbourhood was not without its problems. Racist attitudes prevented people from getting well-paying jobs outside the community and the City of Halifax denied the residents of Africville basic services such as running water, sewage disposal, and garbage collection. Despite being labeled a "slum," the community was lively and vibrant, with a strong sense of culture and tradition.

In the 1960s, in the name of urban renewal, the City of Halifax decided to demolish the community, relocate its residents and use the land for industrial development. Residents of Africville strongly opposed this move, but their homes were bulldozed and they were forced into public housing projects in other parts of the city, and promised, but did not receive social assistance to help them resettle.

After years of pressure from former members of the community and their descendants, the City of Halifax apologized for the destruction of Africville and offered to pay compensation. Through historical photographs, documents, and first-person narratives from former Africville residents, this book offers an account of the racism behind the injustices suffered by the community. It documents how the City destroyed Africville and much later apologized for it.

Educator & Series Information
Recommended for ages 13-18.

This book is part of the Righting Canada's Wrongs series.

Additional Information
96 pages | 11.00" x 9.00" | 300+ colour and b&w visuals

Authentic Canadian Content
$34.95

Coming Soon
Damming the Peace: The Hidden Costs of the Site C Dam
Editors:
Wendy Holm
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Since the 1970s, the Site C Dam in northeastern British Columbia's Peace River Valley has been touted by B.C. Hydro and successive governments as necessary to meet the province's increasing energy needs. With its enormous $10 billion price tag, the dam would be the largest public works project in BC history. It would be the third dam on the Peace River, and destroy traditional unceded territory belonging to Treaty 8 First Nations.

Following the last provincial election, the newly appointed NDP government called for a review of the project, but work on the dam continues. This comes after protests by aboriginal groups and landowners, several lawsuits against the government, and federal government intervention to let the dam go ahead. More recently, there has been a call from a United Nations panel to review how the dam will affect Indigenous land.

This book presents the independent voices of citizen experts describing every important impact of the dam, including:

  • Sustainable energy expert Guy Dauncey on future energy demand, and whether there is likely to be a need for the dam's electricity
  • An interview with aboriginal activist Helen Knott on the dam's assault on traditional lands and culture, in particular Indigenous women
  • Agrologist Wendy Holm on the farm land impact — prime horticulture land important to food security and nutrition
  • Family physician Warren Bell on the effect that loss of traditional way of life and connection to the land has had on the health of aboriginal people
  • Wildlife biologist Brian Churchill with forty years' experience of studying its land and wildlife
  • Former environmental minister Joan Sawicki on government cover-ups and smoking guns
  • Energy industry watchdog Andrew Nikiforuk on the links between dams, fracking and earthquakes
  • Award-winning broadcaster Rafe Mair on how party politics corrupts political leadership, and the role of activism and civil disobedience in shaping government decision-making
  • David Schindler, one of the world's foremost water ecologists, explains the role dams like Site C will play in Canada's climate change strategy
  • Joyce Nelson connects the dots between the Site C dam and continental water sharing plans

Reviews
"Wendy Holm brings another perspective to the case against Site C, that of the production of crops." — Nelson Star, January 2018

"A massive, $10 billion hydroelectric dam project on British Columbia’s Peace River could threaten the First Nations peoples who live nearby. This volume dives deep into the potential impacts and decades of governmental cover-ups related to this long-planned project."— John R. Platt, The Revelator, April 2018

"This book provides an organized and rigorous “how to” guide on the intellectual and fact-based opposition to Site C, and in doing this becomes a great model for a book on any long-term protest. Its ambition is to inform on the subject from every possible angle, keeping the Peace River, the region and its people in mind, rather than the expediency of the business and government angle, which is usually given at least equal weight by the mainstream media." — Cathryn Atkinson, Rabble, June 2018

"There is an "elephant in the room" — not the huge white elephant that you see at No-Site C rallies. This elephant is dark and invisible. The government does not talk about it ... No. This elephant is rather more sinister. Wendy Holm confronts it and exposes it. It's about exporting water."— John Gellard, The Ormsby Review, August 2018

"Damming the Peace is an accessible, thoughtful and informative collection of essays that reveal the grave environmental, human and economic costs if the Site C dam is built."— Tim Pelzer, People's Voice, October 2018

Educator Information
Includes Indigenous content/perspectives and an Interview with Indigenous activist Helen Knott.

Additional Information
272 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
$22.95

Quantity:
Breaking Through: Heroes in Canadian Women's Sport
Authors:
Sue Irwin
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

This book highlights the achievements of Canadian women sports stars — the role models of today's young female athletes. They fought for the right to compete in sports traditionally dominated by men and proved that women's sports are just as competitive and exciting to watch as men's. Spanning decades, Breaking Through focuses on seven sports and the women who made them their own, including well-known legends such as soccer player Christine Sinclair, who brought women's soccer in Canada into the limelight, and hockey player Hayley Wickenheiser, the longest-serving member of Canada's National team and five-time Olympic medalist. Readers will also see basketball, bobsleigh and rugby represented and learn the stories of less well-known athletes such as Indigenous Cross-country skiers Sharon Anne and Shirley Firth, who faced down prejudice, and Carol Hunyh, who brought home Canada's first Olympic gold medal in women's wrestling.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 12-18.

Some, but limited, Indigenous content.

Additional Information
144 pages | 4.25" x 7.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
The Language of Family: Stories of Bonds and Belonging
Editors:
Michelle van der Merwe
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

What is family? Is it defined by blood and birth? Or can we invite whomever we want into that intimate embrace?

The Royal BC Museum's new book, The Language of Family: Stories of Bonds and Belonging, invites readers to pull up a guest chair at the family table.

Twenty contributors from across British Columbia -- museum curators, cultural luminaries, writers and thinkers young and old, from First Nations, LGBTQ, Japanese Canadian and Punjabi communities, among others -- share their vastly different perspectives on what family means in this superb collection of personal narratives, poems and essays.

This collection will provoke, tease, enlighten and infuriate. Isn't that what family does best?

Stories, poems and essays by Sadhu Binning, Martha Black, Don Bourdon, Kathryn Bridge, Tzu-I Chung, Shushma Datt, Mo Dhaliwal, Zoé Duhaime, barbara findlay, Lynn Greenhough, Judith I. Guichon, Lorne F. Hammond, Joy Kogawa, Patrick Lane, Jack Lohman, Luke Marston, Bev Sellars, Monique Gray Smith, Ann-Bernice Thomas and Larry Wong.

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Some, but limited, Indigenous content.

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250 pages | 8.50" x 9.49"

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$27.95

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Chroniques de Kitchike: La Grande debarque
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Avec son premier recueil de nouvelles, Chroniques de Kitchike : la grande débarque, Louis-Karl Picard-Sioui nous propose une incursion au cœur d’une communauté autochtone haute en couleur où se côtoient traditions, rêves, déchéance et… corruption.

Dans une langue imagée, il nous plonge dans le quotidien de femmes et d’hommes ordinaires qui sont confrontés à des forces politiques, économiques et mythiques qui les dépassent. Avec un humour grinçant et un brin de fantastique, l’auteur dépeint les relations parfois tendues dans les communautés du sud du Québec, laissant apparaître en filigrane une radiographie de notre société multiculturelle. Les Chroniques de Kitchike nous transportent dans un univers singulier et désopilant, suave et mythique, où s’anime une galerie de personnages que nous ne sommes pas près d’oublier!

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Short Stories

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Tracer un chemin / Meshkanatsheu : écrits des Premiers Peuples
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Dans cette anthologie, les voix des Premiers Peuples prennent un chemin pour se faire entendre, celui de l’écriture. Choisis pour l’émotion, la curiosité ou la réflexion qu’ils suscitent chez le lecteur, les textes ont été écrits par des femmes et des hommes de différentes générations et de diverses nations et communautés, qui, pour la plupart, ont décidé d’écrire en français.

Sous des formes littéraires variées (poésie, théâtre, roman, nouvelle, chanson, manifeste) résonne d’une manière singulière l’écho d’être au monde, de traverser le cycle de la vie, de grandir au sein du territoire, de vivre en relation avec les membres de sa famille, de son clan et avec les autres. Chaque texte constitue une trace d’un travail de mémoire, d’affirmation, de libération et de partage par l’écriture et la création.

Sous la direction d'Olivier Dezutter, Naomi Fontaine et Jean-François Létourneau.

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Anthologie

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L'Indien malcommode: Un portrait inattendu des Autochtones d'Amerique du Nord (format poche)
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

L’Indien malcommode est à la fois un ouvrage d’histoire et une subversion de l’histoire officielle. En somme, c’est le résultat de la réflexion personnelle et critique que Thomas King a menée depuis un demi-siècle sur ce que cela signifie d’être Indien aujourd’hui en Amérique du Nord. Ce livre n’est pas tant une condamnation du comportement des uns ou des autres qu’une analyse suprêmement intelligente des liens complexes qu’entretiennent les Blancs et les Indiens.« L’Indien malcommode ne va pas vous plaire. Il va vous passionner si la justice vous passionne. Il va vous choquer si vous n’aviez encore rien vu. Il va vous attrister c’est sûr. Mais le pire c’est qu’il va aussi vous faire rire. »Paul Ouellet - L'Indice Bohémien« Vous ne verrez plus l’histoire de l’Amérique de la même façon après avoir lu Thomas King […]. Le lecteur hésite entre la colère et le rire en lisant ce malcommode qui remet quelques mythes et supposées vérités en contexte.»Chantal Guy – La Presse

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Format Poche (Pocket Size)

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C'est fou comme t'as pas l'air d'en être un!
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Cette traduction du recueil d’essais et de chroniques humoristiques de Drew Hayden Taylor, The Best of Funny, You Don’t Look Like One (2015), permet aux francophones de découvrir pour la première fois l’oeuvre unique de l’auteur ojibwe.

Après avoir fait rire (et réfléchir) de nombreux lecteurs grâce aux quatre tomes de Funny You Don’t Look Like One, Taylor a choisi de rassembler ses meilleurs textes en tant qu’observateur ojibwe aux yeux bleus. Il parvient à mettre en lumière, avec un humour intelligent et décalé, les différences entre le mode de vie des Autochtones et celui des Blancs pour briser certains stéréotypes tenaces. Esprit rusé s’il en est un, ce Trickster des temps modernes saura marquer votre imaginaire!

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Kagagi
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12;

La bande dessinée Kagagi: The Raven (Arcana Comics, 2011), écrite et illustrée par l’artiste anishinabe Jay Odjick, est enfin traduite en français par Catherine Ego.La traduction de cette bande dessinée était attendue, surtout à la suite de son adaptation télévisuelle en dessins animés pour le réseau de télévision autochtone APTN, en 2014. Matthew Carver, jeune Autochtone de seize ans, mène une vie plus que normale : le secondaire, les questions existentielles de l’adolescence et les histoires de cœur. Sa vie bascule le jour où il apprend qu’il a hérité d’anciens pouvoirs et qu’il doit empêcher le Windigo de détruire la planète. Matthew n’a d’autre choix que de suivre sa destinée et de devenir Kagagi.L’univers bien connu des super-héros est ici revisité, permettant aux jeunes issus des Premières Nations de se reconnaître dans ce personnage qui partage, en quelque sorte, leur réalité, leurs mythes. Odjick remet en scène la légende du Windigo, laquelle voulait qu’un homme se transformait en être surnaturel et malveillant après avoir consommé de la chair humaine.

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Graphic Novel / Comic Book 

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$19.95

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Birdie (French)
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Quand Birdie, alias Bernice Meetoos, quitte sa réserve et son Alberta natales pour venir s’installer dans un petit logement au-dessus d’une boulangerie à Gibsons, en Colombie-Britannique, des forces mystérieuses semblent trouver un malin plaisir à lui faire perdre le contrôle de sa vie. Souvent, inopinément, elle entre dans un état de transe sur le vieux matelas de sa chambre. Tandis que sa tante Val et sa cousine Freda font la route pour venir à son chevet, Bernice reste prostrée pendant des semaines, oscillant entre le souvenir, le rêve et la réalité.Ce roman dur, raconté avec un mélange de férocité, de tendresse et d’humour noir, vise moins à dénoncer la situation difficile des Autochtones, et des femmes en particulier, qu’à explorer leur capacité à surmonter des traumatismes passés, à guérir et survivre. La transe dans laquelle est plongée Bernice permet à l’auteur d’évoquer les différents problèmes qui minent les communautés autochtones – alcoolisme, violences physiques et sexuelles, abandon, errance – tout en incorporant des éléments propres au folklore cri. Ainsi, chaque chapitre s’ouvre et se referme sur une courte fable ou un poème, tandis que le voyage intérieur du personnage l’amène, par des songes et des réminiscences, à redécouvrir les liens qui l’unissent à la tradition crie, à sa communauté et aux femmes de sa famille, omniprésentes dans le récit.Dépourvu du ton moralisateur et des bons sentiments qui contaminent trop souvent les romans consacrés aux Autochtones, Birdie dresse le portrait d’une série de femmes fortes, déterminées à se battre et à s’entraider pour s’en sortir. À la fois road-novel, songe et journal de voyage, ce roman exprime l’universalité de l’expérience féminine, au-delà de la culture ou de la race.

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Décoloniser le Canada: 50 ans de militantisme autochtone
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

« Je ne souhaite pas célébrer un Canada qui vole nos terres. » C’est en ces termes que s’exprimait Arthur Manuel à la veille du début des célébrations autour du 150e anniversaire de la Confédération canadienne, quelque temps avant de rendre l’âme le 17 janvier 2017. Ce cri du coeur d’une des figures les plus importantes du réveil militant autochtone des 50 dernières années illustre à merveille ce que ce mouvement cherche à nous rappeler quotidiennement : il est temps d’en finir avec la nature coloniale de l’État canadien.Fruit d’une collaboration unique entre deux grands leaders et défenseurs des droits des Premières Nations, soit Arthur Manuel, militant et intellectuel de la nation Secwepemc, et le Grand Chef Ron Derrickson, six fois élu chef de bande de Westbank et un des entrepreneurs autochtones les plus prospères et respectés au pays, Décoloniser le Canada est d’abord le récit de cinquante ans de militantisme autochtone. Cinquante années pendant lesquelles nous avons assistées au réveil autochtone venu rappeler le triste sort réservé aux descendants des premiers habitants de ce pays.Dans ce récit narré au je par Arthur Manuel, un des plus réputés et ardents défenseurs de la cause autochtone sur les scènes nationale et internationale, on revient sur son parcours qui fut étroitement lié à ce que l’auteur et essayiste John Saul a qualifié de « grand retour » des Autochtones et de leurs luttes sur la scène politique. Récit qui retrace le parcours personnel et militant de Manuel, c’est aussi le portrait du renouveau des mouvements de lutte autochtone au pays depuis les années 1970. De la Paix des Braves à la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, en passant par le rapatriement de la Constitution en 1982, la crise d’Oka ou les importants jugements de la Cour suprême ayant considérablement renforcé les revendications des peuples autochtones, on y revisite de grands pans de l’histoire canadienne des cinquante dernières années. Ouvrage de vulgarisation historique écrit dans une langue vivante et accessible, il est la porte d’entrée idéale pour quiconque souhaite s’ouvrir aux réalités autochtones, mais aussi revisiter notre passé récent.Ce livre sage, éclairant et tout à fait accessible ne peut que renforcer et approfondir notre compréhension des questions autochtones. Comme le résume bien Naomi Klein dans sa préface : « Entremêlant l’histoire et la politique aux récits personnels d’une famille haute en couleur, truffée de chefs et de guérisseurs, Arthur Manuel propose un tableau unique du douloureux parcours qui nous a conduits au contexte actuel. Son livre offre également un cours intensif sur les notions juridiques et les droits fondamentaux qui seront de précieux outils dans notre marche commune. »

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Nipimanitu: L'Esprit de l'Eau
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Nipimanitu (L’esprit de l’eau) offre une poésie spirituelle et mystique de l’effondrement, écrite dans l’urgence de tout dire. En trois mouvements – amour intégral, chute et trahison, puis résilience et retour à la vision claire –, il livre un chant révolutionnaire, puisant aux sources de la conscience, du rêve et de la mémoire, qui appelle à une transformation radicale de notre regard sur le monde.

La poésie symboliste de Ross-Tremblay traduit une métaphysique profondément innue qui repousse les limites du langage. L’auteur y exprime une cosmogonie qui aspire à l’immanence et à l’osmose entre l’humain et ce qui fonde sa vie.

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Genre: Poetry

Subjects & Themes: Indigenous Canadian; Nature

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134 pages | 5.51" x 8.50" 

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Muliats
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

La pièce Muliats – première création des Productions Menuentakuan, un collectif engagé et frondeur – revisite, avec un humour mordant et un sincère besoin de crever l’abcès, les relations souvent teintées de malentendus entre Autochtones et Québécois.

Muliats (Montréal, en innu) raconte l’histoire d’un Innu de Mashteuiatsh, Shaniss, qui décide de quitter sa communauté pour s’installer en milieu urbain. Il y fera la rencontre de Christophe, jeune Allochtone et Montréalais d’origine, qui deviendra son colocataire. Momentanément séparés par un choc culturel, les deux hommes apprendront à vivre la beauté de leurs différences et chercheront ensemble à résoudre les dissonances identitaires auxquelles ils sont confrontés. Muliats sonde le gouffre, trop souvent ignoré, qui existe entre deux nations à la recherche de repères. À travers les parcours d’un Autochtone ayant quitté sa communauté, de son frère aîné revendicateur et traditionaliste et d’un jeune Québécois, lui-même en quête de sa propre identité, la pièce explore les thèmes les plus actuels de la réalité des Premières Nations du Québec.

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Genre: Drama

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Wulustek
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Depuis 5 ans, à chaque automne, la famille Miktouch se rassemble devant la clôture d’une compagnie forestière aux abords de la route 230. Elle y revendique pacifiquement un territoire ancestral en son nom et en celui de sa nation, les Malamek. La famille Miktouch, c’est d’abord Matthew le père, chef de la nation Malamek, sa femme Hélène, une Québécoise convertie aux pratiques rituelles amérindiennes, leurs fils Marc, dans la vingtaine, qui travaille au dépanneur de la réserve et David, jeune avocat exilé à Ottawa pour défendre la cause.

J’vais commencer par protéger chacun des arbres. La rivière qui coule de l’autre côté de cette clôture-là, la Wulustek, ben moi, je veux que mes enfants puissent venir se baigner pis boire dans cette eau-là, c’est sacré. Ça, c’est notre survie. C’est ça qui va nous donner la dignité. Y faut jamais perdre ça. C’est toi-même qui me disais ça, m’man. Qu’y fallait toujours prouver qui on était, pis encore aujourd’hui, tu m’le répètes.Un jour, tout ça va servir à quelque chose. Les pancartes, le drapeau, le territoire. Pis une fois qu’on va l’avoir, le territoire, je vais mettre des wigwams tout le long de la rivière, et faire un campement, comme dans le temps de grand-p’pa, pour faire revivre la Nation malamèque.

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Genre: Drama.

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Une vraie bonne petite Metisse
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Signée par Sylvie Nicolas, cette traduction du tout premier recueil de poésie de Marilyn Dumont, A Really Good Brown Girl (Brick Books, 1996), permet enfin aux francophones de découvrir l’œuvre de l’auteure métisse.Directe, sensible, sensuelle, ironique et touchante, l'écriture de Marilyn Dumont témoigne des préjugés et de la méconnaissance des Blancs face à l'histoire des Métis. Sa poésie balaie toutes les frontières susceptibles d'étouffer le souffle d'un héritage d'une grande humanité.près du son des chevaux et du ventquand, assise sur ses genoux dans une tente de toileelle te nourrissait de banique de théet de syllabesdont l'écho te revient en tête, là, maintenantsans pouvoir reproduire le sonde cette voix qui te berçait et chantait pour t'endormirdans la langue du diable.

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This is the French translation of the English Book, A Really Good Brown Girl.

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$16.95

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Homo sapienne
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous European; Greenlandic Inuit;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Révélant une voix exceptionnelle, Homo sapienne suit la vie de cinq jeunes dans la ville de Nuuk, capitale du Groenland. Ils vivent des changements profonds et racontent ce qui, jusqu’à maintenant, a été laissé sous silence : Fia découvre qu’elle aime les femmes, Ivik comprend qu’elle est un homme, Arnaq et Inuk pardonnent et Sara choisit de vivre. Sur « l’île de la colère », où les tabous lentement éclatent, chacune et chacun se déleste du poids de ses peurs.

Niviaq Korneliussen manie une langue crue, sensible et indomptée. Elle parle du désir universel d’être soi, socialement, intimement, confiante que les cœurs et les corps sauront être vrais.

Reviews
"HOMO sapienne has created its own genre. This is unfiltered sexual realism… Niviaq Korneliussen’s novel debut about existential pain and release, breaks and reconciliations, shows us how there are many possible roads to liberation, and it deserves to been known far and wide." - Politiken

"Niviaq Korneliussen is 24 of age and a completely new voice in Greenlandic literature. A voice that has been previously missed, and that I am sure we will hear much more from." - Kristeligt Dagblad

"Niviaq Korneliussen has both the courage and the talent for treating the language exemplary un-exemplary, which leaves a convincing impression of a modern youth that could party almost anywhere but just happen to live in Nuuk. Write she can – the linguistic brushstroke is original." - Weekendavisen

"Korneliussen writes crushingly honest about sex, sexual assaults and social problems, but more than anything the novel is about being true to oneself." -Trelleborgs Allehanda

Educator Information
Caution: mature subject matter.

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French | Paperback | Preface de Daniel Chartier 

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Our Hands Remember: Recovering Sanikiluaq Basket Sewing
Authors:
Margaret Lawrence
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Sanikiluaq, a small Inuit community in the Belcher Islands region of the Far North, has a long history of artistic output. But as the demand for stone carvings grew, grass basket sewing—once a traditional skill for Inuit women—faded from the community consciousness. That was until a group of women, including educator and artist Margaret Lawrence, came together to renew the lost art of basket sewing.

In Our Hands Remember: Recovering Sanikiluaq Basket Sewing, Lawrence guides readers through creating their own grass baskets in the unique style of the Sanikiluaq region with step-by-step instructions and photographs. From tips on preparing the grass and forming even coils to the different types of embellishments, this book is accessible to all skill levels.

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120 pages | 9.00" x 8.50" | Colour Photographs

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$24.95

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Common Fishes of Nunavut
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Discover the rich and varied world of Nunavut's many fishes in this comprehensive guide.  

Covering a broad range of information about Northern fish species, each section includes identification and appearance, habitat and range, relationship to humans, life cycle and reproduction, feeding habits, and other fascinating facts. This book also includes photorealistic illustrations of each species and traditional knowledge about fish collected through interviews with Inuit elders.  

Common Fishes of Nunavut will introduce readers to the stunning range of fishes that live in Arctic rivers, lakes, and oceans. 

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For young adults & adults.

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368 pages | 6.50" x 9.00"

Authenticity Note: Because of the contributions from Inuit elders, this book has received the Authentic Indigenous Text label. It is up to readers to determine if this will work as an authentic resource for their purposes.

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The Nature of Canada
Editors:
Colin M Coates
Graeme Wynn
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Snow-capped mountains. Pristine lakes. Crystalline glaciers. Big-sky sunsets. “Canada” is synonymous with nature, and throughout history people have been drawn to it for its bounty – from fish and furs to gold, wheat, and lumber.

Intended to delight and provoke, these short, beautifully crafted essays, enlivened with photos and illustrations, explore how humans have engaged with Canadian nature and what those interactions say about the nature of Canada.

Tracing a path from the Ice Age to the Anthropocene, some of the foremost stars in the field of environmental history reflect on how we, as a nation, have idolized and found inspiration in nature even as fishers, fur traders, farmers, foresters, miners, and city planners have commodified it and tried to tame it. They also travel lesser-known routes, revealing how Indigenous people listened to glaciers and what they have to tell us; how the weather is not what we must endure but what we make of it; and how even the nature we can’t see – the smallest of pathogens – has served the interests of some while threatening the very existence of others.

The Nature of Canada will make you think differently not only about Canada and its past but quite possibly about Canada and its future. Its insights are just what we need as Canada attempts to reconcile the opposing goals of prosperity and preservation.

Enthralling and engaging, The Nature of Canada will appeal to anyone interested in Canadian history, national identity, and the future of the Canadian environment.

Contributors: Jennifer Bonnell, Claire Campbell, Colin M. Coates, Julie Cruikshank, Ken Cruikshank, Michèle Dagenais, Joanna Dean, Stephen J. Hornsby, Arn Keeling, Tina Loo, Heather E. McGregor, Steve Penfold, Liza Piper, John Sandlos, Graeme Wynn.

Educator Information
How does the nature of Canada define us? These are contemplative meditations on who we are as Canadians. Each short essay is by a star in Canadian history or environmental studies. They are highly readable and deeply interesting. They enlighten, inform, and engage, presenting history in new ways.

This is a book for nature fans, Canadian history readers, and those who ponder who we are as Canadians.

Useful for these subject/course areas: Canadian Studies, Environmental History, Environmental Studies, Geography, History, Literary Nonfiction, Literature.

Contains some/limited Indigenous content.

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320 pages | 5.50" x 8.50" | Illustrations & Content: 72 b&w photos, 4 maps, 2 charts

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$29.95

Coming Soon
Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Sioux; Dakota; Lakota;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

How two centuries of Indigenous resistance created the movement proclaiming “Water is life”.

In 2016, a small protest encampment at the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota, initially established to block construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline, grew to be the largest Indigenous protest movement in the twenty-first century. Water Protectors knew this battle for native sovereignty had already been fought many times before, and that, even after the encampment was gone, their anticolonial struggle would continue. In Our History Is the Future, Nick Estes traces traditions of Indigenous resistance that led to the #NoDAPL movement. Our History Is the Future is at once a work of history, a manifesto, and an intergenerational story of resistance.

Reviews
“Embedded in the centuries-long struggle for Indigenous liberation resides our best hope for a safe and just future for everyone on this planet. Few events embody that truth as clearly as the resistance at Standing Rock, and the many deep currents that converged there. In this powerful blend of personal and historical narrative, Nick Estes skillfully weaves together transformative stories of resistance from these front lines, never losing sight of their enormous stakes. A major contribution.”—Naomi Klein, author of This Changes Everything

“In Our History Is the Future historian Nick Estes tells a spellbinding story of the 10 month Indigenous resistance at Standing Rock in 2016, animating the lives and characters of the leaders and organizers, emphasizing the powerful leadership of the women. Alone this would be a brilliant analysis of one of the most significant social movements of this century. But embedded in the story and inseparable from it is the centuries-long history of the Oceti Sakowin’ resistance to United States’ genocidal wars and colonial institutions. And woven into these entwined stories of Indigenous resistance is the true history of the United States as a colonialist state and a global history of European colonialism. This book is a jewel—history and analysis that reads like the best poetry—certain to be a classic work as well as a study guide for continued and accelerated resistance.”—Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz, author of An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States

“When state violence against peaceful protest at Standing Rock became part of the national consciousness, many noticed Native people for the first time—again. Our History Is the Future is necessary reading, documenting how Native resistance is met with settler erasure: an outcome shaped by land, resources, and the juggernaut of capitalism. Estes has written a powerful history of Seven Fires resolve that demonstrates how Standing Rock is the outcome of history and the beginning of the future.”—Louise Erdrich, author of the National Book Award winner The Round House

“A touching and necessary manifesto and history featuring firsthand accounts of the recent Indigenous uprising against powerful oil companies … With an urgent voice, Estes reminds us that the greed of private corporations must never be allowed to endanger the health of the majority. An important read about Indigenous protesters fighting to protect their ancestral land and uphold their historic values of clean land and water for all humans.” —Kirkus

Our History Is the Future is a game-changer. In addition to providing a thorough and cogent history of the long tradition of Indigenous resistance, it is also a personal memoir and homage to the Oceti Sakowin; an entreaty to all their relations that demands the ‘emancipation of the earth.’ Estes continues in the legacy of his ancestors, from Black Elk to Vine Deloria, he turns Indigenous history right-side up as a story of self-defense against settler invasion. In so doing, he is careful and judicious in his telling, working seamlessly across eras, movements, and scholarly literatures, to forge a collective vision for liberation that takes prophecy and revolutionary theory seriously. The book will be an instant classic and go-to text for students and educators working to understand the ‘structure’ undergirding the ‘event’ of the Dakota Access Pipeline. This is what history as Ghost Dance looks like.”—Sandy Grande, author of Red Pedagogy: Native American Social and Political Thought

“Nick Estes is a forceful writer whose work reflects the defiant spirit of the #NoDAPL movement. Our History Is the Future braids together strands of history, theory, manifesto and memoir into a unique and compelling whole that will provoke activists, scholars and readers alike to think deeper, consider broader possibilities and mobilize for action on stolen land.”—Julian Brave Noisecat, 350.org

Additional Information
320 pages | 5.50" x 8.25"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$35.95

Coming Soon
The Hands' Measure: Essays Honouring Leah Aksaajuq Otak's Contribution to Arctic Science
Editors:
John MacDonald
Nancy Wachowich
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

The essays in this collection explore a wide variety of topics broadly related to cultural renewal and representation, oral history, heritage, and social change among the Inuit of Igloolik, in Nunavut’s northern Qikiqtani Region.

This is an eclectic collection of essays written and compiled in recognition of Leah Aksaajuq Otak. The essays explore a wide variety of topics broadly related to cultural renewal and representation, oral history, heritage, and social change among the Inuit of Igloolik, in Nunavut's northern Qikiqtani Region. Leah was a skilled oral historian and linguist from Igloolik, whose essential contribution to scientific research in Nunavut inspired those who knew and worked with her.

During the last two decades of her life, Leah Otak worked at the Igloolik Research Centre, where she played a crucial role facilitating the fieldwork of visiting researchers from near and far. Her collaboration with researchers, particularly in the social sciences, together with her extensive work documenting Inuit oral histories, ensured that Inuit traditional knowledge and perspectives informed and were reflected in much of the resulting research.

Contributors to the volume include:
Eva Aariak; George Qulaut; Hugh Brody; Kenn Harper; Louis-Jacques Dorais; Susan Rowley; Claudio Aporta; Jack Hicks; Sheena Kennedy Dalseg; Bernadette Driscoll Engelstad; Jonathan King; Sylvie LeBlanc; John MacDonald; Birgit Pauksztat; Willem Rasing; Noah Richler; and Nancy Wachowich.

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392 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authenticity Note: Some of the contributors to this work are Indigenous; therefore, the Authentic Indigenous Text label has been applied.

 

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Kangiryuarmiut Inuinnaqtun: Uqauhiitaa Numiktitirutait Dictionary
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

The product of intensive, highly detailed work, this dictionary is more than a language document. It is a unique window into the Inuinnait culture and way of life.

Kangiryuarmiut Inuinnaqtun Uqauhiitaa Numiktitirutait - Kangiryuarmiut Inuinnaqtun Dictionary details the Kangiryuarmiut dialect of Inuinnaqtun, as spoken in the community of Ulukhaktok in the Inuvialuit Region of Canada's Northwest Territories. Very similar dialects of Inuinnaqtun are spoken in Qurluqtuq (Kugluktuk) and Iqaluktuuttiaq (Cambridge Bay) in Nunavut.

This is the most comprehensive dictionary of any Western Canadian dialect of the Inuit language. It contains over 5,000 Inuinnaqtun entries and subentries with their translations, over 3,000 example sentences, and a large inventory of suffixes.

The introduction includes a brief overview of Inuinnaqtun, its sound system, orthography, and major word classes. Main entries include both related subentries and examples. Suffix entries include information about lexical categories, inflection, the different forms a suffix may take, and examples of how each suffix is used.

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582 pages | 6.50" x 9.50" | English, Inuinnaqtun

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Native American Landmarks and Festivals: A Traveler's Guide to Indigenous United States and Canada
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;

From ancient rock drawings, historic sites, and modern museums to eco- and cultural tourism, sports events and powwows, the provides a fascinating tour of the rich heritage of Indigenous people across the continent. Whether it’s the annual All Indian Rodeo in Las Vegas, Nevada, a dog-sledding trek in Arctic Bay, Nunavut, or a rough ride to the ancient Kaunolu Village Site on Lanai, Hawaii, there is lots more to experience in the Indigenous world right around the corner, including The Montezuma Castle National Monument, Trail of Tears National Historic Trail, The Red Earth Festival in Oklahoma City, The Autry Museum of the American West, The Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center, The Thunderbird Powwow, The First Nations Film and Video Festival in various cities and states, The Angel Mounds State Memorial, The Harvest Moon American Indian Festival, The Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Canada’s National Aboriginal Veterans Monument, and hundreds more!

Native American Landmarks and Festivals guides the traveler to 729 landmarks, sites, festivals, and events in all 50 states and Canada. Travelers not only read about the history and traditions for each site, but maps, photos, illustrations, addresses and websites are also included to help further exploration. This book lets the reader choose from a vast array of “authentic” adventures such as dog sledding, camping in a tipi, hunting and fishing expeditions, researching the history with the people who made the history, making crafts, herbal walks, building and sailing in canoes, hiking along ancient routes, exploring rock art, and preparing and eating Native foods. Organized by region, Indigenous enterprises are included in state and federal parks, including federal and international heritage sites, public and private museums and non-Native events that include Indigenous voice. This convenient reference also has a helpful bibliography and an extensive index, adding to its usefulness. Whether traveling by car, plane, or armchair, Native American Landmarks and Festivals: A Traveler’s Guide to Indigenous United States and Canada will bring hours of enjoyable discovery.

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448 pages | 6.46" x 8.92"

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The Path to Wild Food: Edible Plants & Recipes for Canada
Authors:
Sandra Walker
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Taking a refreshing and practical approach, The Path to Wild Foods is an ethical field guide and recipe book that promotes respect for the natural world and for the cultures that use it effectively. Written by an accomplished ethnobotanist and educator, this book rekindles an interest in natural foods, including taking best advantage of “nature’s pharmacy” for medicinal plant use. Learn about the variety of plants around you to harvest and what to do with them once you have collected them:

  • Rekindles an appreciation of the adventure of collecting wild plants for food and flavours
  • Fosters respect for nature and finding ways to feed ourselves beyond the supermarket
  • Includes various plant types from trees and shrubs to herbs and wetland plants
  • Describes a variety of parkland and prairie plants along with potential uses
  • Provides recipes using many of the species identified
  • Highlights some of the ethics and risks of wildcrafting
  • Identifies poisonous plants to avoid
  • Explores the wisdom of Indigenous Knowledge.

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192 pages | 5.25" x 8.25"

Text Content Note: Includes some/limited Indigenous content.

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Environmental Activism on the Ground: Small Green and Indigenous Organizing
Editors:
Jonathan Clapperton
Liza Piper
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Environmental Activism on the Ground draws upon a wide range of interdisciplinary scholarship to examine small scale, local environmental activism, paying particular attention to Indigenous experiences. It illuminates the questions that are central to the ongoing evolution of the environmental movement while reappraising the history and character of late twentieth and early twenty-first environmentalism in Canada, the United States, and beyond. 

This collection considers the different ways in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous activists have worked to achieve significant change. It examines attempts to resist exploitative and damaging resource developments, and the establishment of parks, heritage sites, and protected areas that recognize the indivisibility of cultural and natural resources. It pays special attention to the thriving environmentalism of the 1960s through the 1980s, an era which saw the rise of major organizations such as Greenpeace along with the flourishing of local and community-based environmental activism. 

Environmental Activism on the Ground emphasizes the effects of local and Indigenous activism, offering lessons and directions from the ground up. It demonstrates that the modern environmental movement has been as much a small-scale, ordinary activity as a large-scale, elite one.

Reviews
"Environmental Activism on the Ground succeeds splendidly in complicating and enriching our understanding of modern environmentalism. Focusing on Indigenous and non-Indigenous activists in an impressive range of settings, Jonathan Clapperton and Liza Piper draw together and interpret diverse methodological and conceptual insights in a way that gives new, deserved prominence to those who have strived—and continue to strive—for environmental justice at the local level. These accounts left me both enlightened and heartened. Scholars from across the humanities and social sciences will welcome this volume." - Richard A. Rajala, Department of History, University of Victoria.

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Table of Contents:

Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: In the Shadow of the Green Giants: Environmentalism and Civic Engagements - Jonathan Clappeton & Liza Piper

Part 1: Processes and Possibilities
1. Strategies for Survival: First Nations Encounters with Environmentalism - Anna J. Willow
2. Native/Non-Native Alliances: Challenging Fossil Fuel Industry Shipping at Pacific Northwest Ports - Zoltán Grossman
3. Conserving Contested Ground: Soverigenty-Driven Stewardship by the White Mountain Apache Tribe and the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation - Jon R. Welch
4. From Southern Alberta to Northern Brazil: Indigenous Conservation and the Preservation of Cultural Resources - Sterling Evans
5. Parks For and By the People: Acknowledging Ordinary People in the Formation, Protection, and Use of State and Provincial Parks - Jesica M. DeWitt

Part 2: Histories
6. Alternatives: Environmental and Indigenous Activism in the 1970s - Liza Piper
7. Marmion Lake Generating Station: Another Northern Scandal? - Tobasonakwut Peter Kinew
8. Environmental Activism as Anti-Conquest: The Nuu-chah-nulth and Environmentalists in the Contact Zone of Clayoquont Sound - Jonathan Clapperton
9. Local Economic Independence as Environmentalism: Nova Scotia in the 1970s - Mark Leeming
10. “Not an Easy Thing to Implement”: The Conservation Council of New Brunswick and Environmental Organization in a Resource-Dependent Province, 1969-1983 - Mark J. McLaughlin
11. The Ebb and Flow of Local Environmental Activism: The Society for Pollution and Environmental Control (SPEC), British Columbia - Jonathan Clapperton
12: From Scoieal Movement to Environmental Behemoth: How Greenpeace Got Big - Frank Zelko

Afterword: Lessons from the Ground Up - Jonathan Clapperton & Liza Piper
Bibliography
List of Contributors
Index

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752 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authenticity Note: Because this work includes contributions from Indigenous peoples, it has been labelled as containing Authentic Indigenous Text.

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Indigenous Relations: Insights, Tips & Suggestions to Make Reconciliation a Reality
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Inuit; Métis;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Indigenous Relations: Your Guide to Working Effectively with First Nations, Metis, and Inuit

The eagerly awaited sequel to the bestselling 21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act, a guide to business and intercultural communications by the CEO of Indigenous Corporate Training, a leading cultural sensitivity training program.

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200 pages | 8.00" x 5.00"

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Coming Soon
Talking to the Moon
Authors:
Jan Coates
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq; Métis;
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

Deep roots. Last year in Social Studies, Miss Matattall got us to draw our family trees. Mine was the only one with no roots and just one full branch for me, plus a half branch for Moonbeam. Because maybe she's already dead, and that's why she didn't come back to get me.

Katie was four when her mother gave her up. Katie is a bright girl on the high end of the autism spectrum. The only memories she has are in her "Stack of Stories" notebook. When Katie spends the summer in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia with her foster mother, the connection she feels to this historic town makes Katie determined to find out about her past. Befriending locals like Aggie, an older woman, who shares a series of letters sent by a young girl who arrived in Lunenburg in 1752, and Aggie's sister, a reclusive eccentric who lives in the woods, help Katie to find clues to her own past. She can't help feeling that she has found her true roots.

Reviews
"It's hard to pinpoint the charm of this book. Partly it is Katie, herself, her precision and her colour sense, her need for her personal space; partly it is Catherine Marguerite's letters, or bits of them, that we get in fits and starts, finding out about how life was back when, and partly it is the mystery of Katie's background that the reader will probably figure out before Katie, herself, does. All in all, Talking to the Moon is a book with a mystery, an interesting protagonist, and good background material. It also has a moral: don't despair over information that you have only heard as an eavesdropper; you may have it, or its context, completely wrong! Highly Recommended!"— CM Magazine

"Katie, 11, doesn’t remember Moonbeam, the birth mother who left her the amethyst geode she treasures along with a message scrawled on a bookmark from a shop in Lunenburg, the picturesque, seaside town where Katie and her foster mother, Muzzy, are spending a month. Searching for Moonbeam, Katie feels a bond with another lonely girl, Catherine, whose French Protestant family immigrated here in the 1750s. Aggie, Catherine’s elderly descendant whom Katie helps out, shares her history and memorabilia, to which Aggie’s long-estranged sister, a reclusive carver, and two children with deep local roots add missing pieces. Along with Katie’s and Catherine’s, a third narrative thread concerns Catherine’s descendants; each touches on consequences of European settlement to the Mi’kmaw and, later, the Métis peoples. Katie’s likable; her self-aware narration clarifies her challenges. Her uniquely ordered world is believable, as are her bouts of anxiety and difficulty reading emotions. Bullied in Montreal, in Lunenburg Katie meets only understanding and kindness. No one’s offended when she avoids physical contact or finds her conceited when she (accurately) enumerates her abilities. This blend of a contemporary search for roots with finely detailed colonial history rewards patient readers, especially fans of historical fiction" - Kirkus Reviews

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Recommended for ages 10-14. 

Themes/Keywords: Foster Care, Disabilities & Special Needs, Family, Bullying, Colonial History.

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332 pages | 5.25" x 7.50"

 

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Rebecca Belmore: Facing the Monumental
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Facing the monumental issues of our time.

In a 2012 performance piece, Rebecca Belmore transformed an oak tree surrounded by monuments to colonialism in Toronto's Queens Park into a temporary "non-monument" to the Earth.

For more than 30 years, she has given voice in her art to social and political issues, making her one of the most important contemporary artists working today. Employing a language that is both poetic and provocative, Belmore's art has tackled subjects such as water and land rights, women's lives and dignity, and state violence against Indigenous people. Writes Wanda Nanibush, "by capturing the universal truths of empathy, hope and transformation, her work positions the viewer as a witness and encourages us all to face what is monumental."

Rebecca Belmore: Facing the Monumental presents 28 of her most famous works, including Fountain, her entry to the 2005 Venice Biennale, and At Pelican Falls, her moving tribute to residential school survivors, as well as numerous new and in-progress works. The book also includes an essay by Wanda Nanibush, Curator of Indigenous Art at the AGO, that examines the intersection of art and politics. 

Rebecca Belmore is one of Canada's most distinguished artists. She has won the Hnatyshyn Award (2009), the Governor General's Award in Visual and Media Arts (2013), and the Gershon Iskowitz Prize (2016). A member of Lac Seul First Nation, she was the first Aboriginal woman to represent Canada at the Venice Biennale. She has also participated in more than 60 one-person and group exhibitions around the world.

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132 pages | 10.25" x 10.25" | 198 Illustrations

 

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$40.00

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To This Day: For the Bullied and Beautiful
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

An authentic rallying cry for anyone who has been affected by bullying. 

In February 2013, Shane Koyczan's passionate anti-bullying poem "To This Day" electrified the world. An animated video of the lyric narrative went viral, racking up over 12 million hits to date and inspiring an international movement against bullying in schools. Shane later performed the piece to sustained applause on the stage of the 2013 annual TED Conference. 

Now this extraordinary work has been adapted into an equally moving and visually arresting book. Thirty international artists, as diverse as they are talented, have been inspired to create exceptional art to accompany "To This Day." Each page is a vibrant collage of images, colors and words that will resonate powerfully with anyone who has experienced bullying themselves, whether as a victim, observer, or participant. 

Born of Shane's own experiences of being bullied as a child, To This Day expresses the profound and lasting effect of bullying on an individual, while affirming the strength and inner resources that allow people to move beyond the experience. A heartfelt preface and afterword, along with resources for kids affected by bullying, make this book an invaluable centerpiece of the anti-bullying movement. 

Reviews
"The poem is searing, exposing the short and long-term impacts of bullying, and rallying those who engage with the poem to take action and become active participants in stopping bullying. The range of art in this trim book is extraordinary; this is a true double-impact collection with the power of the verse itself interpreted in drastically different ways through the illustrative choices, from realistic sketches to comic book-style renderings to abstract representations of the tone rather than words on the page." — Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, November 2014

"His passionate, implacable rejection of bullying describes the effect school violence has on the hearts and minds of its victims. But Koyczan also offers hope for healing." — Publishers Weekly, August 2014

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Recommended Ages: 10-18

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72 pages | 6.50" x 9.75"

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Rowing the Northwest Passage: Adventure, Fear, and Awe in a Rising Sea
Authors:
Kevin Vallely
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

"Vallely transports the reader to places few will ever go: the very edges of the earth and of human endurance."—Evan Solomon

In this gripping first-hand account, four seasoned adventurers navigate a sophisticated, high-tech rowboat across the Northwest Passage. One of the “last firsts” remaining in the adventure world, this journey is only possible because of the dramatic impacts of global warming in the high Arctic, which provide an ironic opportunity to draw attention to the growing urgency of climate change.

Along the way, the team repeatedly face life-threatening danger from storms unparalleled in their ferocity and unpredictability and bears witness to unprecedented changes in the Arctic habitat and inhabitants, while weathering gale-force vitriol from climate change deniers who have taken to social media to attack them and undermine their efforts.

Reviews
"Not the usual curricular fit, but a book that offers important messages under the wrap of a thrilling adventure story. Four men attempt to row across the Northwest Passage, aiming to prove that climate change is exerting a dramatic effect on Arctic waters. They meet longtime residents of the North, many of whom are Indigenous. These people, reliant on the sea as a food source, bear witness through accounts of how the climate has shifted, and how quickly the Arctic ice is melting. The rowers show tremendous respect for all of the residents they meet. Besides its primary focus on climate and ocean, the book incorporates the history of previous voyages and the region. Vallely includes extensive notes and references." -BC Books for BC Schools 2018-2019, Association of Book Publishers of British Columbia

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Recommended resource for grades 11-12 for these subject areas: Environmental Science, Science for Citizens.

Caution: Swearing is prevalent, with frequent use of the F-word.

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224 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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$24.95

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Raven Walks Around the World: Life of a Wandering Activist
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Haida;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

In 1970, twenty-two-year-old Thom Henley left Michigan and drifted around the northwest coast, getting by on odd jobs and advice from even odder characters. He rode the rails, built a squatter shack on a beach, came to be known as "Huckleberry" and embarked on adventures along the West Coast and abroad that, just like his Mark Twain namesake, situated him in all the right and wrong places at all the right and wrong times. Eventually, a hippie named Stormy directed him to Haida Gwaii where, upon arrival, a Haida Elder affirmed to the perplexed Huckleberry that she had been expecting him. From that point onward, Henley's life unfolded as if destiny were at work--perhaps with a little help from Raven, the legendary trickster.

While kayaking the remote area around South Moresby Island, Henley was struck by the clear-cut logging and desecration of ancient Haida village sites. Henley collaborated with the Haida for the next fourteen years to spearhead the largest environmental campaign in Canadian history and the creation of Gwaii Haanas National Park. Later, he became a co-founder of Rediscovery--a wilderness program for First Nations and non-aboriginal youth that would become a global model for reconciliation.

Henley's story is peppered with a cast of unlikely characters serendipitously drawn together, such as the time he hosted then-Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau and entourage, including five-year-old Justin Trudeau, at his remote driftwood hippie hut (the visit was unanticipated and at the time the helicopter touched down, Henley and a friend were doing laundry). Over and over, Henley found himself at the epicentre of significant events that included a historic train caravan across Canada, an epic Haida canoe voyage, an indigenous rights campaign world tour for the Penan tribespeople of Borneo, as well as two global disasters--the 2004 South Asian tsunami and the 2015 Nepal earthquake.

Beautifully recounted with passion, humour and humility, Raven Walks around the World is a moving and thoughtful account of a life lived in harmony with the land and community.

Educator Information
Recommended resource for grades 10-12 for these subject areas: Contemporary Indigenous Studies, English Studies, Environmental Science, Literary Studies, BC First Peoples

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272 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authenticity Note: This book has been labelled as containing Authentic Indigenous Text because the author was formally adopted by the Haida and bestowed with the new name "Yaahl Hlaagaay Gwii Kaas" (Raven Walks around the World).  This is in keeping with Strong Nations Authenticity Guidelines.  It is up to readers to determine if this will work as an authentic resource for their purposes.

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Kuei, My Friend: A Conversation on Race and Reconciliation
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Kuei, My Friend is an engaging book of letters: a literary and political encounter between Innu poet Natasha Kanapé Fontaine and Québécois-American novelist Deni Ellis Béchard. Choosing the epistolary form, they decided to engage together in a frank conversation about racism and reconciliation.

Intentionally positioned within the contexts of the Idle No More movement, Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the National Inquiry into Missing or Murdered Aboriginal Women and Girls, the letters in Kuei, My Friend pose questions in a reciprocal manner: how can we coexist if our common history involves collective and personal episodes of shame, injury, and anger? how can we counteract misunderstandings of the Other, which so often lead to contempt and rejection? how can we educate non-Indigenous communities about the impact of cultural genocide on the First Peoples and the invisible privileges resulting from historical modes of domination?

In an attempt to open a sincere and productive dialogue, Kanapé Fontaine and Ellis Béchard use their personal stories to understand words and behaviours that are racist or that result from racism. With the affection and intimacy of a friend writing to a friend, Natasha recounts to her addressee her discovery of the residential schools, her obsession with the Oka Crisis of 1990, and her life on the Pessamit reserve. Reciprocating, Deni talks about his father’s racism, the segregation of African-Americans and civil rights, and his identity as a Québécois living in the English-speaking world.

By sharing honestly even their most painful memories, these two writers offer an accessible, humanist book on the social bridge-building and respect for difference. Kuei, My Friend is accompanied by a chronology of events, a glossary of relevant terms in the Innu language, and, most importantly, a detailed teacher’s guide that includes topics of discussion, questions, and suggested reflections for examination in a classroom setting.

Educator Information
Recommended resource for Grades 10-12 in these areas: BC First Peoples, Contemporary Indigenous Studies, English First Peoples, English Studies, Literary Studies.

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176 pages | 6.21" x 8.46" | Translated by & Deni Ellis Béchard & Howard Scott  

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Coming Soon
Groundswell: Indigenous Knowledge and a Call to Action for Climate Change
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Groundswell is a collection of stirring and passionate essays from both Indigenous and non-Indigenous writers that, together, present a compelling message about how traditional Indigenous knowledge and practices can—and must be—used to address climate change. The chapters eloquently interconnect, taking us from radical thinking to the gentleness of breath, demonstrating that we are all in this together, that we must understand what needs to be accomplished and participate in the care of Mother Earth.

Authors tap into religious and spiritual perspectives, explore the wisdom of youth, and share the insights of a nature-based philosophy. These collective writings give you a chance to contemplate and formulate your own direction. A moral revolution that can produce a groundswell of momentum toward a diverse society based on human rights, Indigenous rights, and the rights of Mother Earth.

Beautifully illustrated with photographs, Groundswell is augmented with video recordings from the authors and a short documentary film, available on the project’s website. Profits from the book will help support the videos, documentary, and future projects of The Call to Action for Climate Change. Visit www.envisionthebigpicture.com.

 

Reviews

“The most important environmental development of the last decade is the full emergence and full recognition of the Native leadership at the very front of every fight. One of the things that makes that leadership so powerful is its deep roots in tradition and thought; this book gives the reader some sense of that tradition, though of course it is so vast that it would take a thousand such books to capture it all!”— Bill McKibben; Author Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet

 

“This book shares Indigenous knowledge that can teach us to listen to and be in relationship to the Earth in a way that honors the sacredness and interdependence of all life forms. A paradigm shift, informed by Indigenous ways of knowing and acting, is crucial in this time of climate change.”— Laura Stivers; Author of Disrupting Homelessness: Alternative Christian Approaches

 

Groundswell: Indigenous Knowledge and a Call to Action for Climate Change... is a powerful text that introduces a much-needed perspective on the issue of climate change. Much has been said and written on the topic of climate change from a purely logical perspective, which is essential, but Groundswell introduces an equally important perspective, that of the spiritual implications of climate change. From the perspective of Native people, we start to unravel the complex emotions when learning of the negative effects of climate change through an entirely different lens than the lens supplied to us through westernized education. There is an aspect of spiritual connection that Native people have when approaching the topic of climate change and the destructive and corrosive actions taken against our Earth. I hate to use the phrase “spiritual connection,” because spirituality has been wrongly stripped down to a non-science, when in reality, it is something that just cannot be defined by science. One’s spirit is only one way of saying, one’s being, essence, one’s present energy, or one’s connection to all that is, beyond thought and logic. It is the core of us all, and it is a feeling that connects us all, and in my opinion, uniquely respected and understood by Native people. This is one reason I believe Native people feel an obligation to protect this Earth, because we hold this truth close culturally. We and everything are one, and the destruction of our planet is also the destruction of ourselves. When reading the chapter “Rooted: Staying Grounded Amidst a Changing Landscape” by Nicole Neidhardt, Teka Everstz, and Gina Mowatt, I was moved by the presence of youth voices. As a young, Indigenous person myself I felt a great power, understanding, and nuance to the voices emerging in the chapter. The writers spoke of the complexities and the duality of living as an Indigenous person in western society that I have myself experienced. They also addressed the modern paradox of social media, in that in as many ways as it is bringing people together, in many ways it is tearing us apart and allowing for non-accountability in our society. It is rare to find a text that so genuinely sums up the issues of living as an Indigenous youth in western culture and our struggle of being heard when voicing our truths. I believe that this text, in the hands of other young people like the writers will be moved by it like I was. Nicole Neidhardt, Teka Everstz, and Gina Mowatt asked for more than a challenge of the reader’s ideology, they screamed out for a call to action." — Forrest Goodluck; Award-winning youth filmmaker, appears opposite Leonardo DiCaprio in The Revenant

 

“Reading the reflections of three young Indigenous activists (Rooted: Staying Grounded Amidst a Changing Landscape) is special and something I’ve admittedly never experienced before. What I thought about while reading this was my own decades' long growing pains, not just in body, but rather identity. My own insecurities has led me down dark walkways toward depression and anxiety. For years—and still to this day—I am petrified of the inescapable uncertainty the universe’s laws present me. I had zero doubts about three Cosmic proclamations: death, taxes and thermodynamics. Their stories are a sharp, buoyant reminder of elation and advocacy in a world of overwhelming and seemingly unlimited power: colonialism, imperialism and industrial capitalism. These narratives bring me moral conviction and faith as we all walk hand-in-hand into our carbon wrought future.”  Kalen Goodluck; A freelance documentary photographer, photojournalist, and journalist

 

Groundswell is about helping one another through the threat of death we experience on this increasingly traumatized planet—in the air, on the land and in the water—and nurturing it back to life. Neidhardt and his kindred spirits offer us new, yet familiar, resources for a creative participation in that gracious process. “New” for us who are not yet listening attentively to Indigenous instructions voiced in their “Older Testament.” “Familiar” insofar as we are given to see, truly see, our relatedness and belonging to all things, great and small, in this created world, our “common home” (Pope Francis). One message powerfully conveyed throughout this book is that planetary health is primary, whereas human well-being is derivative (Thomas Berry). This message turns the infamous “Doctrine of Discovery” upside down, inviting us, all of us together, into fresh discoveries of healing wisdom in ancient treasures still alive and well for us. Again, “together”: “A little trickle of water that goes alone goes crookedly” (Gbaya proverb). Together we may pray for vibrant faith and spiritual rootedness to yield justice: equilibrium throughout creation and among all people. Such faith is indeed a “renewable energy” (Larry Rasmussen)!”  Thomas G. Christensen; Author of An African Tree of Life

 

Educator Information
Recommended Resource for Grades 11-12 and College/University Students.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface 
Invocation: Using Contemplative Meditation to Foster Change 
Introduction: This Is the Moral Revolution
Climate Change Snapshots by Kristen Dey 
Rooted: Staying Grounded Amidst a Changing Landscape by Nicole Neidhardt, Teka Everstz, and Gina Mowatt 
What You Need to Know Is Not in a Book: Indigenous Education by Larry Emerson 
Illuminating the Path Forward by Erin Brillon 
Stories from Our Elders by Andy Everson 
Religions for the Earth by Karenna Gore 
How We Can Work Together by Merle Lefkoff 
Essential Elements of Change by Mary Hasbah Roessel 
The Radical Vision of Indigenous Resurgence by Taiaiake Alfred 
Sharing the Wealth: Bending Toward Justice by Rod Dobell 
The Commonwealth of Breath by David Abram 
Science, Spirituality, Justice by Larry Rasmussen 
The Moral Revolution, Weaving All the Parts by Joe Neidhardt
Acknowledgements 
Further References 
Further Readings 
Contributors

Contributors: David Abram, Taiaiake Alfred, Erin Brillon, Kristen Dey, Rod Dobell, Larry Emerson, Andy Everson, Teka Everstz, Karenna Gore, Merle Lefkoff, Gina Mowatt, Joe Neidhardt, Nicole Neidhardt, Larry Rasmussen, Mary Hasbah Roessel.

 

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216 Pages | 8.5" x 9" | ISBN: 9781771743440 | Hardcover 

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Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$49.95

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There’s Something in the Water: Environmental Racism in Indigenous & Black Communities
Authors:
Ingrid R G Waldron
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

In There’s Something In The Water, Ingrid R. G. Waldron examines the legacy of environmental racism and its health impacts in Indigenous and Black communities in Canada, using Nova Scotia as a case study, and the grassroots resistance activities by Indigenous and Black communities against the pollution and poisoning of their communities.

Using settler colonialism as the overarching theory, Waldron unpacks how environmental racism operates as a mechanism of erasure enabled by the intersecting dynamics of white supremacy, power, state-sanctioned racial violence, neoliberalism and racial capitalism in white settler societies. By and large, the environmental justice narrative in Nova Scotia fails to make race explicit, obscuring it within discussions on class, and this type of strategic inadvertence mutes the specificity of Mi’kmaq and African Nova Scotian experiences with racism and environmental hazards in Nova Scotia. By redefining the parameters of critique around the environmental justice narrative and movement in Nova Scotia and Canada, Waldron opens a space for a more critical dialogue on how environmental racism manifests itself within this intersectional context.

Waldron also illustrates the ways in which the effects of environmental racism are compounded by other forms of oppression to further dehumanize and harm communities already dealing with pre-existing vulnerabilities, such as long-standing social and economic inequality. Finally, Waldron documents the long history of struggle, resistance, and mobilizing in Indigenous and Black communities to address environmental racism.

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184 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$25.00

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Carey Prince: How a First Nations Kid Became a Superstar Goaltender
Authors:
Catherine Rondina
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Twenty years ago, Carey Price was flying 319 kilometres across British Columbia in his father's plane so he could play on the nearest organized hockey team. Today, he is the highest-paid goalie in the NHL. But he's never forgotten where he started.

The son of an NHL draftee and the chief of the Ulkatcho First Nation, Carey got his start on skates as a toddler, first on a frozen creek and then on his father's homemade rink. The natural athlete went on to become the top amateur player in Canada in 2002, getting drafted fifth overall by the Montreal Canadiens three years later. Now one of the most recognizable figures in hockey, Carey credits his success to his community of Anahim Lake, where hard work and commitment often face off against remoteness and cost. Throughout his incredible career, he's taken every opportunity possible to encourage all young people, especially those who share his Indigenous background, to follow their dreams.

Reviews
"The book is aimed at middle-grade readers, ages 12+, and has a decidedly different approach to telling his remarkable story. For one, author Catherine Rondina chose to really spotlight Price's Indigenous background ... The pocketbook from Lorimer's RecordBooks series crams a lot into its 150 pages, from Price's early days in the remote Anahim Lake, B.C., to leading Canada to a gold medal at the 2014 Olympic Games in Sochi."— Greg Oliver, Society for International Hockey Research, June 2018

"This slim, pocket-size biography manages to convey an awful lot of information through engaging, brief chapters and breezy vocabulary. Readers will come away with an overview of acclaimed goalie Carey Price's hockey career to date."— Kathleen McBroom, Booklist, August 2018

"An inspiring story, especially for hockey fans and not just for reluctant teen readers."— Kirkus Reviews, May 2018

"A short and captivating peek into a remarkable athlete's life for middle schoolers."— School Library Journal, October 2018

Educator Information
Hi-Lo Book.
Interest age: From 12 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 3.5
Lexile Reading Level: 890L

Additional Information
152 pages | 4.25" x 7.00"

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$12.95

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Starlight Tour: The Last, Lonely Night of Neil Stonechild
Authors:
Susanne Reber
Robert Renaud
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

A teen's suspicious death, a shocking police cover-up and a mother's search for truth: this landmark investigation into justice and Canada's Indigenous people is re-issued and updated here for the first time in over a decade.

In 1990, on a brutally cold night, 17-year-old Neil Stonechild disappeared from downtown Saskatoon, last seen in police custody. His frozen body was found three days later in a field outside town. Though his mother pressed for answers, a cursory investigation pinned the blame on the teen himself, dead by alcohol and misadventure. Only in 2000, when two more men were found frozen to death, and a third survived his "starlight tour" at the hands of police, did the truth about Stonechild's fate begin to emerge. Soon one of the country's most prominent Indigenous lawyers was on the case, and an open secret was secret no more.

With exclusive co-operation from the Stonechild family, lawyer Donald Worme, and others, Starlight Tour is an engrossing portrait of rogue cops, racism, obstruction of justice and justice denied, not only to a boy and his family but to an entire nation.

Reviews
“For justice junkies like myself, this is a deeply engrossing account…. Should be compulsory reading for Canadian police recruits from sea to shining sea.” –William Deverell, The Globe and Mail

“The Stonechild story is ably captured by veteran CBC journalists Susanne Reber and Robert Renaud in a thoroughly researched, deftly written work…. A powerfully written, meticulously researched work with a cinematic feel, which should be on reading lists for students of Canadian history, journalism or law enforcement.” –Toronto Star

“The suspenseful and meticulous account of a very real and dark chapter in Canada’s modern history.” –TIME (Canada)

Additional Information
448 pages | 6.04" x 8.98"

Authentic Canadian Content
$22.00

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Shutout
Authors:
Jeff Ross
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

Alex Paterson is the number-one goalie on his high-school hockey team. And he's thrilled that his team has made the playoffs. But when graffiti that apparently can be traced back to Alex is found on the walls of the school, and a photo of Alex at a party with a beer in his hand starts making the rounds, he is suspended from the team, and his reputation as a good kid is put in doubt. Alex knows he's innocent. The problem is, he cannot figure out who would want to frame him. Or why. Is it the other goalie who wants all the glory for himself? Or someone from a rival team looking for an advantage? With everyone assuming the worst about him, it's up to Alex to find out who is behind it all, not only to clear his name, but to save the season.

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the Orca Sports series. Orca Sports stories engage middle-schoolers and teens with fast-paced plots and easy-to-read language. Topics include a variety of team and individual sports. Reading levels from grade 2.0 to 4.5; Interest level ages 10+.

Themes / Keywords: competition, bullying, social media, peer pressure, teen romance.

RL: 3.4

Additional Information
160 pages | 4.25" x 7.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$9.95

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The Goddaughter Does Vegas
Authors:
Melodie Campbell
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Gina Gallo is a mob goddaughter who doesn't want to be one. She's left her loopy family behind to elope with Pete to Vegas. Except that eloping may be a mortal sin in an Italian family. Between that and some weird deliveries and suitors, Gina's nerves are frayed. Vegas is full of great acts, but one impersonation is real: Gina has a crime-committing double whose activities are making Gina front-page news. Gina has to track down this fiendish fraud before the police catch up with her. And, of course, cousin Nico is along for the ride.

Another madcap adventure for the loveable Gallo cousins that proves the rule "Why should things go right when they can go wrong?"

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the Rapid Reads series. Rapid Reads are short novels and nonfiction books for young adults aged 16+ and adult readers. They are intended for a diverse audience, including ESL students, reluctant readers, adults who struggle with literacy and anyone who wants a high-interest quick read.

Additional Information
144 pages | 4.75" x 7.25"

Authentic Canadian Content
$9.95

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