Browse Books for Teens

1 - 11 of 11 Results (Teen Books Starting With "K")
Sort By
# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Kayas, Ochekiwi Sipi: Fisher River Before 1950
Authors:
Verna Kirkness
Format: Hardcover
This beautiful hard cover book by Verna J. Kirkness invites readers to go back in time and enjoy stories and photos of Ochekiwi Sipi (Fisher River) before 1950, as told by the Elders. This book was written and created for the 140th Anniversary of Ochekiwi Sipi in 2015.
$12.95

Quantity:
Keeper 'N Me
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;

A mystical novel reflecting a positive view of native life and philosophy, it's about a three-year-old who was taken from his home on an Ojibway reserve and placed in a series of foster homes. Join him as he travels back to the reserve and discovers his sense of place and of self.

When Garnet Raven was three years old, he was taken from his home on an Ojibway Indian reserve and placed in a series of foster homes. Having reached his mid-teens, he escapes at the first available opportunity, only to find himself cast adrift on the streets of the big city.

Having skirted the urban underbelly once too often by age 20, he finds himself thrown in jail. While there, he gets a surprise letter from his long-forgotten native family.

The sudden communication from his past spurs him to return to the reserve following his release from jail. Deciding to stay awhile, his life is changed completely as he comes to discover his sense of place, and of self. While on the reserve, Garnet is initiated into the ways of the Ojibway -- both ancient and modern -- by Keeper, a friend of his grandfather, and last fount of history about his people's ways.

By turns funny, poignant and mystical, Keeper 'n Me reflects a positive view of Native life and philosophy -- as well as casting fresh light on the redemptive power of one's community and traditions.

Educator Information
Grades 10-11 BC English First Peoples resource for the unit How Do We Define Ourselves? 

Additional Information
336 pages | 4.99" x 8.01"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$21.00

Quantity:
Kesu': The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer
Authors:
Jennifer Kramer
Format: Paperback
Fully illustrated and engagingly written, K'esu' is the first book to honour this Kwakwaka'wakw artist's ground-breaking work Northwest Coast.

Kwakwaka'wakw art is renowned for its flamboyant, energetic and colourful carving and painting. Among the leading practitioners was Doug Cranmer, whose style was understated, elegant and fresh and whose work quickly found an international following in the 1960s. He was an early player in the global commercial art market and one of the first Native artists in British Columbia to own his own gallery.

A long-time teacher, he inspired generations of young Native artists in Alert Bay, British Columbia, and across the province. To date, however, his considerable contributions have gone largely unrecognized. This beautifully illustrated book is a record of the art, life and influence of a man who embodied "indigenous modern" before the term had been coined but preferred the descriptor "whittler" or "doodler" to "Kwakwaka'wakw artist."

Skillfully weaving excerpts from his friends and family, facts about his life and examples of his stunning artwork, K'esu' captures the artist's personality and his paradoxes in this wide-ranging celebration of Cranmer, his oeuvre and his profound influence on generations of Kwakwaka'wakw artists.
$29.95

Quantity:
KipocihkÃn: Poems New And Selected
Format: Paperback
The first anthology of urban Aboriginal songs by Gregory Scofield is a retrospective of the award-winning poet's pivotal work to date. The word "kipocihkan" is Cree slang for someone who is mute or unable to speak, and charted in this book is Scofield's journey out of that silence to become one of the most powerful voices of our time.
"I make offerings to my Grandmothers and Grandfathers when I write. I ask them to come and sit with me, to give me courage and strength. I ask them to help me be honest, reflective of the ceremony that I am about to begin. I ask them to guide me, to help me touch people. I ask to make good medicine, even out of something bad. When people read my work it's not just the book that they read, it's the medicine behind the words. That's where the power comes from. That''s where the healing comes from."
--Scofield in "January Magazine"
$17.95

Quantity:
Kiss of the Fur Queen
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Cree;

Born into a magical Cree world in snowy northern Manitoba, Champion and Ooneemeetoo Okimasis are all too soon torn from their family and thrust into the hostile world of a Catholic residential school. Their language is forbidden, their names are changed to Jeremiah and Gabriel, and both boys are abused by priests.

As young men, estranged from their own people and alienated from the culture imposed upon them, the Okimasis brothers fight to survive. Wherever they go, the Fur Queen--a wily, shape-shifting trickster--watches over them with a protective eye. For Jeremiah and Gabriel are destined to be artists. Through music and dance they soar.

Educator Information
Grade 11/12 English First Peoples resource for the unit Further Steps toward Reconciliation - Understanding Residential Schools through Text.

Note: This novel contains mature and challenging material (profanity, coarse language, depictions of sex, sexual abuse, violence, etc.). 

Additional Information
320 pages | 5.20" x 8.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$22.00

Quantity:
Kit's Wilderness
Authors:
David Almond
Format: Paperback

The Printz Award winning classic gets a new look.

The Watson family moves to Stoneygate, an old coal-mining town, to care for Kit's recently widowed grandfather. When Kit meets John Askew, another boy whose family has both worked and died in the mines, Askew invites Kit to join him in playing a game called Death. As Kit's grandfather tells him stories of the mine's past and the history of the Watson family, Askew takes Kit into the mines, where the boys look to find the childhood ghosts of their long-gone ancestors. Written in haunting, lyrical prose, Kit's Wilderness examines the bonds of family from one generation to the next, and explores how meaning and beauty can be revealed from the depths of darkness.

Awards

  • Michael L. Printz Award Winner
  • ALA Notable Book
  • Publishers Weekly Best Book

Additional Information
256 pages | 4.19" x 6.94"

$8.99

Quantity:
Kiyam: Poems
Authors:
Naomi McIlwraith
Format: Paperback
Through poems that move between the two languages, McIlwraith explores the beauty of the intersection between nêhiyawêwin, the PlainsCree language, and English, âkayâsîmowin. Written to honour her father's facility in nêhiyawêwin and her mother's beauty and generosity as an inheritor of Cree, Ojibwe, Scottish, and English, kiyâm articulates a powerful yearning for family,history, peace, and love.
$16.95

Quantity:
Klee Wyck
Authors:
Emily Carr
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

This is the first of the Emily Carr Library, seven books by Emily Carr completely redesigned and dedicated to restoring Carr's text, as originally published. For the first time since 1951, Klee Wyck is available in its entirety and will appear simultaneously in elegant hardcover and trade paperback editions.

The legendary Emily Carr was primarily a painter, but she first gained recognition as a writer. Her first book, published in 1941, was titled Klee Wyck ("Laughing One"), in honour of the name that the Native people fo the west coast gave her as an intrepid young woman. The book was a hit with both critics and the public, won the prestigious Governor Generals' Award and has been in print ever since. 

Emily Carr wrote these twenty-one word sketches after visiting and living with Native people, painting their totem poles and villages, many of them in wild and remote areas. She tells her stories with beauty, pathos and a vivid awareness of the comedy of people and situations. 

A few years after Carr's death, significant deletions were made to her book for an educational edition. This new, beautifully designed keepsake volume restores Klee Wyck to its original published version, making the complete work available for the first time in more than fifty years. In her intriguing introduction, archivist and writer Kathryn Bridge puts Klee Wyck into the context of Emily Carr's life and reveals the story behind the expurgations.

Does contain some stereotyping language.

Suggested Grades: 8-12
ABPBC

Authentic Canadian Content
$14.95

Quantity:
Kou-Skelowh - We Are The People: A Trilogy of Okanagan Legends
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Okanagan;

This beautifully illustrated edition is a collection of original Okanagan legends with time-honoured lessons for children - the values of sharing, respect and reverence for life in all forms. Told in a strong rhythmic style, this new edition now includes the text in both languages: English and Okanagan.

Awards

  • B.C. Millennium Book Awards
  • 2000 Winner of the B.C. Millennium Book Awards

Reviews
"How Turtle Set the Animals Free is a surprising tortoise-and-hare legend with far-flung consequences. How Food Was Given describes the care and sacrifice of the four Chiefs of plant and animal life devoted to the new people who will soon come to Earth...Barb Marchand's vital, expressive watercolours bring the creatures alive. Her adroit portrayal of self-important Coyote in the telling but hilarious How Names Were Given adds to his personality. The touching humanity of this story is the stuff of great legends. And, Marchand's illustrations echo the compassionate but musical voice that tells this story." - Elizabeth MacCallum, Children's Book Reviewer, Globe & Mail.

Additional Information
88 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$18.95

Quantity:
Kwädąy Dän Ts’ìnchį: Teachings from Long Ago Person Found
Format: Paperback
On a late summer day, many years ago, a young man set out on a voyage through the mountains. He never reached his destination. When his remains were discovered by three British Columbia hunters, roughly three hundred years after he was caught by a storm or other accident, his story had faded from even the long memory of the region’s people, the local Champagne and Aishihik Indigenous peoples. First Nations Elders decided to call the discovery Kwädąy Dän Ts’ìnchį—Long Ago Person Found.

The discovery of the Kwädąy Dän Ts’ìnchį man raised many questions. Who was he and how did he die? Where had he come from? Where was he going, and for what purpose? What did his world look like? But his remains, preserved in glacial ice for centuries, offered answers, too—as did the traditional knowledge and experience of the Indigenous peoples in whose territories he lived and died—setting in motion a unique multidisciplinary collaboration between indigenous peoples and the scientific community based on mutual respect.

Through forensic investigation we learn that he was 18 years old, 5'8" tall, had a tapeworm, a gastric ulcer, and was in the early stages of tuberculosis. From the food sources found in his stomach, colon, and rectum, we learned he traveled 70 km in two days. We know he died in August because flowers of the beach asparagus, found in his stomach, only bloom in August, in the area he was found.

In this comprehensive and collaborative account, scientific analysis and cultural knowledge interweave to describe a life that ended just as Europeans were about to arrive in the northwest. What emerges is not only a portrait of an individual and his world, but also a model for how diverse ways of knowing, in both scholarly and oral traditions, can complement each other to provide a new understanding of our complex histories.

Additional Information
688 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

Illustrations & Content: color and black and white photographs throughout, maps, charts, appendices, references, index

Edited by Richard J. Hebda, Sheila Greer, Alexander Mackie.
Authentic Canadian Content
$49.95

Quantity:
Kynship: The Way of Thorn and Thunder (Book 1)
Authors:
Daniel Heath Justice
Format: Paperback

Book One in the trilogy (Kynship, Wyrwood, and Dreyd).

The Everland-home of the tree-born Kyn since time immemorial, a deep green world of ancient mystery and danger. The wyr-powers of the Kyn and the other Eld Folk have preserved this wild region from the ravenous hunger of Humanity for over a thousand years, but those powers are fast fading away. As the eyes of Men turn once more to the Everland and its rich bounty, the leaders of the Folk gather in Sheynadwiin, the Kyn capital, hoping to find a way to survive the growing storm. She is Tarsadeshae the Spearbreaker a fearless Kyn warrior trained in the Redthorn ways of battle and blood. She knows her place in the Everland's cycle of life and death, and that knowledge gives her strength and purpose. Yet Tarsa's ordered world is shattered when an act of courage goes horribly awry, and her spirit awakens to the wild wyr of her ancestors powers long persecuted by the assimilationist Shields and their allies. As she struggles to reconcile her former life with the call of the rising bloodsong, Tarsa joins the summons of the Sevenfold Council, where she is swept into the struggle between those Folk who would embrace the promises of Men, and those who would hold fast to the rooted understandings of the Eld Green. For all who call the Everland home, there can be no middle path.

$12.95

In Re-Print
Sort By

    Contact Us:

  • Suite 1 - 1970 Island Diesel Way
    Nanaimo, BC, Canada, V9S 5W8
    Phone: 250.758.4287
    Toll Free: 1.888.278.2202
© Copyright 2005 - 2018 Strong Nations Publishing Inc. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy. Shipping Policy.