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Carmen L. Robertson

Carmen L. Robertson is mixed blood (Lakota/Scottish) scholar currently working on projects related to the art and mythology of Anishinaabe artist Norval Morrisseau. She is an associate professor of art history at University of Regina and also maintains an active curatorial practice.

Clearing a Path: New Ways of Seeing Traditional Indigenous Art
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

The first book, Clearing a Path: New Ways of Seeing Traditional Indigenous Art, is edited by First Nations University of Canada scholar Carmen Robertson and noted Saskatchewan Métis artist and scholar, Sherry Farrell Racette.

"In 2005, as part of the province's centennial celebrations, the Saskatchewan Arts Board contracted Carmen Robertson and Sherry Farrell Racette to curate an exhibition which would bring together a diverse group of contemporary artists working in traditional Indigenous media," says Brian Mlazgar, publications manager of the CPRC. "When Clearing a Path opened in November of that year, few could have predicted the strength of its work. More than three years later, the exhibition continues to flourish and tour."

The exhibition catalogue includes photographs of the works and brief biographies of the 21 participating artists. Artists' statements for many of the pieces provide unique insight into the artistic process and the artist's connection to his or her history and traditions. In two introductory essays, Robertson and Farrell Racette explore the history of traditional artists and their art: the criminalization of indigenous arts and ceremonies, the subsequent loss of culture through colonization and more recently, the struggle to have their work considered "art" rather than "handicraft."

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$29.95

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Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

Seeing Red is a groundbreaking study of how Canadian English- language newspapers have portrayed Aboriginal peoples from 1869 to the present day. It assesses a wide range of publications on topics that include the sale of Rupert's Land, the signing of Treaty 3, the Northwest Rebellion and Louis Riel, the death of Pauline Johnson, the outing of Grey Owl, the discussions surrounding Bill C-31, the "Bended Elbow" standoff at Kenora, Ontario, and the Oka Crisis. The authors uncover overwhelming evidence that the colonial imaginary not only thrives but dominates depictions of Aboriginal peoples in mainstream newspapers. The colonial constructs ingrained in the news media perpetuate an imagined Native inferiority that contributes significantly to the marginalization of Indigenous people in Canada. That such imagery persists to this day suggests strongly that the country lives in denial, failing to live up to its boosterism of the cultural mosaic.

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$27.95

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