Wayne Arthurson

Wayne Arthurson was born in Edmonton, Canada, the son of a Cree father and French Canadian mother. Since the age of 24, Wayne has worked as a professional writer, as a reporter, editor, copywriter, communications officer, freelance writer and novelist. He has also been a semi-professional clown and drummer in a punk rock band. He now drums in an indie rock band and lives in Edmonton with his family.

His first crime novel, Fall From Grace, (Forge Book 2011) won the $10,000 2012 Alberta Readers Choice Award.
The second novel in the Leo Desroches series, A Killing Winter, was published in the Spring of 2012.
Fall from Grace
Author: Wayne Arthurson
Format: Paperback
  • Leo Desroches goes straight—off the streets, into the newsroom, and up to his neck in murder.Marking the debut of Leo Desroches, one of the most unusual amateur detectives ever to appear in Canada or points south, this fast-paced, enthralling mystery is the story of a man who had everything, lost it all, and is trying to get it back. Leo Desroches doesn’t look like a native, but his mother was Cree, and he understands the problems of indigenous Canadians of the First Nations. Which is probably why the Edmonton newspaper he writes for decides he should be their Aboriginal Issues reporter.He has his own issues to deal with: his compulsive gambling that he couldn’t stop even after it cost him his wife and children; his alcoholism; the risk-taking that threatens to derail him every time he starts to get his life back together.When he’s assigned to cover the murder of a young native prostitute, it’s just one more story...until the cop in charge lets him view the corpse, something the Edmonton police never do. When Leo writes his article, it starts a chain of events that leads him to discover a much, much bigger story, one that could bring down the entire police department...if it doesn’t get him killed.

$16.99

Out of Print
In the Shadow of Our Ancestors
Author: Wayne Arthurson
Format: Paperback
  • Searching through the annals of North American history uncovers the diverse and astounding contributions by the Natives of the Americas who formed the world we know today. In the Shadow of Our Ancestors explores the rich history of the Indigenous peoples of North America and leaves us in awe of their stunning achievements and inventions:

    The Great Law of Peace -- The ideals, words and symbols of the Iroquois Confederacy inspired the governments of the New World to form democracies that recognized, in their constitutions, the rights of all people

    Potatoes -- The lowly potato, a staple food of Natives for almost 15,000 years, was unknown outside the Americas until Europeans arrived; now, with almost 4000 varieties, it is the fourth most-consumed agricultural product in the world

    Sacagawea -- The settlement of western North America was inspired and influenced by the results of the Lewis and Clark expedition in the early 1800s, with the journey's success made possible because of a Native woman named Sacagawea, whose presence paved the way for the explorers to be seen as a peaceful party.

    Kayaks -- It may be that the Inuit of the Arctic were the first to circumnavigate the globe in these simple craft. Kayaks have been in use for at least 4000 years as a form of transportation and for hunting, and the technology spread throughout northern waters and was adopted by the Scots and the Irish

    Code Talkers -- During World War II, more than 400 Navajo soldiers, recruited by the United States Marine Corps, transmitted secret tactical messages over military telephone or radio communications using codes built upon their Native languages.

$18.95

Quantity:
Spirit Animals
Author: Wayne Arthurson
Format: Paperback
  • First Nations peoples have long believed in the power of spirit animals or totems. Tribal beliefs held that these animals had lessons to teach, as well as healing or inspirational powers. Bears symbolized leadership and courage. Buffalo held the power of life. The coyote was thought to have brought survival knowledge to humans but also death. Turtles are symbols of peace and balance. And the wolf was considered a great teacher, who taught humans how to build communities and to hunt. Wayne Arthurson writes with authority on the tradition of spirit animals and how their meaning reflects the spiritual and physical relationship between humans and Nature.

$18.95

Out of Print

    Contact Us:

  • Suite 1 - 1970 Island Diesel Way
    Nanaimo, BC, Canada, V9S 5W8
    Phone: 250.758.4287
    Toll Free: 1.888.278.2202
© Copyright 2005 - 2017 Strong Nations Publishing Inc. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy. Shipping Policy.