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Flawed Precedent: The St. Catherine's Case and Aboriginal Title
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Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

In 1888, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in London ruled in St. Catherine’s Milling and Lumber Company v. The Queen, a case involving the Saulteaux people’s land rights in Ontario. This precedent-setting case would define the legal contours of Aboriginal title in Canada for almost a hundred years, despite the racist assumptions about Indigenous peoples at the heart of the case.

In Flawed Precedent, preeminent legal scholar Kent McNeil thoroughly investigates this contentious case. He begins by delving into the historical and ideological context of the 1880s. He then examines the trial in detail, demonstrating how prejudicial attitudes towards Indigenous peoples and their use of the land influenced the decision. He also discusses the effects that St. Catherine’s had on Canadian law and policy until the 1970s when its authority was finally questioned by the Supreme Court in Calder, then in Delgamuukw, Marshall/Bernard, Tsilhqot’in, and other key rulings.

McNeil has written a compelling and illuminating account of a landmark case that influenced law and policy on Indigenous land rights for almost a century. He also provides an informative analysis of the current judicial understanding of Aboriginal title in Canada, now driven by evidence of Indigenous law and land use rather than by the discarded prejudicial assumptions of a bygone era.

This book is vital reading for everyone involved in Aboriginal law or title, legal historians and scholars, and anyone interested in Indigenous rights in Canada.

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224 pages | 5.50" x 8.50" | 10 b&w photos, 4 maps

Authentic Canadian Content
$27.95

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From the Ashes: My Story of Being Métis, Homeless, and Finding My Way
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

In this extraordinary and inspiring debut memoir, Jesse Thistle, once a high school dropout and now a rising Indigenous scholar, chronicles his life on the streets and how he overcame trauma and addiction to discover the truth about who he is.

If I can just make it to the next minute... then I might have a chance to live; I might have a chance to be something more than just a struggling crackhead.

From the Ashes is a remarkable memoir about hope and resilience, and a revelatory look into the life of a Métis-Cree man who refused to give up.

Abandoned by his parents as a toddler, Jesse Thistle briefly found himself in the foster-care system with his two brothers, cut off from all they had known. Eventually the children landed in the home of their paternal grandparents, but their tough-love attitudes meant conflicts became commonplace. And the ghost of Jesse’s drug-addicted father haunted the halls of the house and the memories of every family member. Struggling, Jesse succumbed to a self-destructive cycle of drug and alcohol addiction and petty crime, spending more than a decade on and off the streets, often homeless. One day, he finally realized he would die unless he turned his life around.

In this heartwarming and heartbreaking memoir, Jesse Thistle writes honestly and fearlessly about his painful experiences with abuse, uncovering the truth about his parents, and how he found his way back into the circle of his Indigenous culture and family through education.

An eloquent exploration of what it means to live in a world surrounded by prejudice and racism and to be cast adrift, From the Ashes is, in the end, about how love and support can help one find happiness despite the odds.

Reviews
From the Ashes hits you like a punch in the gut. It’s an unflinching, heartrending and beautifully written story of survival against seemingly impossible odds. But it’s also a book that should make you furious. Thistle paints a vivid portrait of a country seemingly incapable of doing right by Indigenous youth or by those struggling with homelessness, addiction and intergenerational trauma. That he survived to tell this story is truly a miracle. Still, one question haunts me after finishing this powerful and devastating book: How do we ensure that the next generation isn’t forced to navigate a broken system that takes their lives for granted and fails them at every turn? My greatest hope, then, is that From the Ashes will be the wakeup call Canada needs.” — IAN MOSBY, historian and author of Food Will Win the War

Educator Information
Caution: Deals with mature subject matter.

Additional Information
368 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"


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$24.99

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Fun Learning Activities for Modern Foreign Languages Book/CD: A Complete Toolkit for Ensuring Engagement, Progress and Achievement
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Students learning modern foreign languages often comment that it is just too hard to learn, and remember, all of vocabulary presented to them. Yes, there is a lot of content that needs to be covered, and a lot of vocabulary that needs to be learned. But there is a way of making this process engaging and motivating. Language lessons needn't be full of grammar worksheets, endless drilling and rote learning lists of vocabulary.

Learning languages isn't always fun and games. But these aren't games; they are fun learning activities. And they can help revolutionise language teaching; enabling teachers to authoritatively impart knowledge while fostering a thirst for knowledge and love of learning in their students.

First, the Vocab Fun Learning Activities (VFLAs) - learn the vocabulary in ways which will improve recognition and recall. Then, the Fun Learning Activities - use this vocabulary knowledge to build sentences and paragraphs; explore and use this language while keeping the whole class engaged and actively learning. The activities are designed to encourage all students to participate and learn more through enjoyment. Based on the author's extensive classroom experience, and underpinned by research into how students learn best, each activity comes complete with a detailed explanation and plenty of ideas for variations, differentiations and extensions. The activities come with example vocabulary lists in French, German and Spanish as a starting point, which are also available on the CD-ROM. However, the activities will work effectively in any language and with any vocabulary list of the teacher's choosing, and can be adapted to suit every topic, learning objective and age range. Discover ready to use activities which will make for outstanding lessons in every class and ensure engagement, motivation, rapport, progress and attainment over time.

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264 pages | 8.27" x 9.45"

$34.95

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Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Indigenous traditions can be uplifting, positive, and liberating forces when they are connected to living systems of thought and practice. Problems arise when they are treated as timeless models of unchanging truth that require unwavering deference and unquestioning obedience. Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism celebrates the emancipatory potential of Indigenous traditions, considers their value as the basis for good laws and good lives, and critiques the failure of Canadian constitutional traditions to recognize their significance.

Demonstrating how Canada’s constitutional structures marginalize Indigenous peoples’ ability to exercise power in the real world, John Borrows uses Ojibwe law, stories, and principles to suggest alternative ways in which Indigenous peoples can work to enhance freedom. Among the stimulating issues he approaches are the democratic potential of civil disobedience, the hazards of applying originalism rather than living tree jurisprudence in the interpretation of Aboriginal and treaty rights, American legislative actions that could also animate Indigenous self-determination in Canada, and the opportunity for Indigenous governmental action to address violence against women.

Awards

  • 2017 Donald Smiley Prize awarded by the Canadian Political Science Association joint winner

Reviews
"This remarkable work is at once challenging and accessible, philosophical and practical, and wide-ranging while firmly rooted in Anishinaabe tradition. Borrows takes a realistic, creative, and intellectually rigorous approach to some of the most difficult and pressing issues in Indigenous law, constitutional law, and political philosophy, as well as all readers who wish to better understand the relationship between indigenous peoples and Canada."— Katherine Starks, Saskatchewan Law Review

Additional Information
384 pages | 5.98" x 8.99"

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$35.95

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From the Tundra to the Trenches
Editors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

“My name is Weetaltuk; Eddy Weetaltuk. My Eskimo tag name is E9-422.” So begins From the "Tundra to the Trenches." Weetaltuk means “innocent eyes” in Inuktitut, but to the Canadian government, he was known as E9-422: E for Eskimo, 9 for his community, 422 to identify Eddy.

In 1951, Eddy decided to leave James Bay. Because Inuit weren’t allowed to leave the North, he changed his name and used this new identity to enlist in the Canadian Forces: Edward Weetaltuk, E9-422, became Eddy Vital, SC-17515, and headed off to fight in the Korean War. In 1967, after fifteen years in the Canadian Forces, Eddy returned home. He worked with Inuit youth struggling with drug and alcohol addiction, and, in 1974, started writing his life’s story. This compelling memoir traces an Inuk’s experiences of world travel and military service. Looking back on his life, Weetaltuk wanted to show young Inuit that they can do and be what they choose. 

Reviews
“Endlessly interesting; an account of a traditional way of life now lost, a gripping first-hand account of a front-line soldier during the war, and an honest account of a young man’s adventures and misadventures. It is to all our benefit that it has, at last, found its way into print." — Michael Melgaard, The National Post

“Tender, honest, and often raw, Weetaltuk’s storytelling is masterful, engrossing, and deeply human. He has imbued his writing with a philosophical nuance that is characteristically Inuit: very subtle, yet profound." — Siku Allooloo, The Malahat Review

“Recounts the adventures of Inuk veteran Eddy Weetaltuk, from his early life in the North to his escape to the south under an assumed identity, to his enlistment in the Canadian Forces, which took him across the Canadian West, to Japan and Germany, and into battle in Korea. Adopting the name Eddy Vital was necessary in 1951 because the federal government restricted the movement of Inuit people. Through his alias, Weetaltuk was able to see the world; in the army, he experienced equality and respect – all the while never forgetting his true identity as an Inuk. The publication history of From the Tundra to the Trenches is itself a four-decades-long saga of many twists and turns. That it now finds English publication (after first appearing in French and German) owes to the author’s conviction that his life story be read as a work of literature with the makings of a bestseller. Eddy Weetaltuk was right.”— Jade Colbert, The Globe and Mail

“For those interested in Inuit culture it offers the rare and valuable perspective of an Inuk looking out from his culture at the world rather than the world looking in. “ — P. T. Sherrill, CHOICE

Series Information
From the Tundra to the Trenches is the fourth book in the First Voices, First Texts series, which publishes lost or underappreciated texts by Indigenous writers. This new English edition of Eddy Weetaltuk’s memoir includes a foreword and appendix by Thibault Martin and an introduction by Isabelle St-Amand.

Additional Information
280 pages | 5.50" x 8.50" | 25 colour illustrations, 3 b&w photographs, bibliography

 

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Flow, Spin, Grow: Looking for Patterns in Nature
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

Branching, spiraling, spinning—you can find patterns almost anywhere in nature, if you look for them. This book is a starting point that introduces kids to some major patterns in the natural world. Just as the branches of a tree spread upwards into the sky, roots branch deep into the ground. Branches also spread through our bodies, inside our lungs and veins. Storms and snail shells spiral; electrons and galaxies spin.

With brief text and full-spread illustrations, this book is designed to inspire kids to observe, discover, and explore hidden structures and shapes in the natural world around them. Why are things the way they are? This question, key to scientific inquiry, runs throughout the text.

Artwork in multilayered screen prints shows how the natural world is inherently beautiful, from the curve of your ear to the spiraling arms of our galaxy. Kids will come away with a deeper understanding that we are all connected to nature and part of its patterns.

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 4-8.

Curriculum Connections:

  • Language Arts: Reading Comprehension
  • Math: Patterns

Key Features:

  • Excellent STEM pick with links to math, space, weather patterns, the human body, and more.
  • Encourages kids to observe and inquire about the world around them.
  • Author's note provides further deatil about patterns in nature and the human body.

Reading Levels
Grade: K-5
Fountas & Pinnell: N

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

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$19.95

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From Bear Rock Mountain: The Life and Times of a Dene Residential School Survivor
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Dene;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

In this poetic, poignant memoir, Dene artist and social activist Antoine Mountain paints an unforgettable picture of his journey from residential school to art school—and his path to healing.

In 1949, Antoine Mountain was born on the land near Radelie Koe, Fort Good Hope, Northwest Territories. At the tender age of seven, he was stolen away from his home and sent to a residential school—run by the Roman Catholic Church in collusion with the Government of Canada—three hundred kilometres away. Over the next twelve years, the three residential schools Mountain was forced to attend systematically worked to erase his language and culture, the very roots of his identity.

While reconnecting to that which had been taken from him, he had a disturbing and painful revelation of the bitter depths of colonialism and its legacy of cultural genocide. Canada has its own holocaust, Mountain argues.

As a celebrated artist and social activist today, Mountain shares this moving, personal story of healing and the reclamation of his Dene identity.

Additional Information
272 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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Authentic Indigenous Text
$30.00

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Family Ties That Bind: A Self-Help Guide to Change Through Family of Origin Therapy
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

Improve your personal relationships.

Most people’s lives are complicated by family relationships. Birth order, our parents’ relationship, and the “rules” we were brought up with can affect our self-esteem and relationships with spouses, children, and other family members. Family of Origin therapy and techniques can help you create better relationships.

This easy-to-read, practical book explains how families function and what you can do to change the way you act in your family and with other people. Exercises show how to apply the principles to your own situation and develop a more positive approach to all aspects of your life. Topics covered include:

  • What makes it so difficult to be myself with my family?
  • How is my relationship with my spouse affected by how my family acted when I was a child?
  • Will my parents still love me if I let them know my real feelings?
  • How has my birth order and my gender affected my personality?
  • What birth order in a spouse is the best match for me?
  • Why do I always feel rejected when my spouse disagrees with me?
  • How can I change the way I react?
  • What role does my family history play in my life?
  • How can I improve my communication skills?

Step-by-step exercises show how to make contact with “lost” family members, how to interview relatives to develop a clearer picture of how each member fits into the family tree, and how to find different and better ways of dealing with family relationships. Professionals will also find this book a useful companion to their therapy sessions with clients.

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152 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$16.95

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Finding John Rae
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Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: University/College;

John Rae was known as the “Arctic Fox” for his ability to trek vast distances in a short time across the Arctic. This creative nonfiction biography of the celebrated Arctic explorer begins in 1854 when, on a mapping expedition to the Boothia Peninsula, Rae discovers the missing link in the Northwest Passage and the fate of the missing Franklin Expedition — learning from Inuit hunters that Franklin’s ships had been beset by ice, and that the crew, starving in the cold, had resorted to cannibalism. When the Scottish-born scientist and Hudson’s Bay Company Chief Factor reports the details in private to the British Admiralty, his statement is secretly but deliberately released to the newspapers. Led by such well-known figures as Charles Dickens and Sir John Franklin’s widow, much of the population rises against Rae and his Inuit informants. Alice Jane Hamilton goes on to explore how Rae, through bitter disappointment and soaring hope, rebuilds his life, all the while defending the integrity of the Arctic natives who brought him the evidence of cannibalism.

Reviews
"Alice Jane Hamilton skilfully blends fact and fiction to breathe new life into the thrilling story of John Rae, the most successful, and yet least celebrated, Arctic explorer of the 19th century. " — Tom Muir, author of Orkney Folk Tales

Finding John Rae brings one of the greatest, and most under-appreciated, 19th-century Arctic explorers vividly to life.” — John Wilson, author of Discovering the Arctic

Additional Information
228 pages | 9.00" x 6.00"

This book is creative nonfiction, a genre of writing that presents factually accurate narratives using literary style and technique (creativity).

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$21.95

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Fire Song
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 9; 10; 11; 12;

How can Shane reconcile his feelings for David with his desire for a better life?

Shane is still reeling from the suicide of his kid sister, Destiny. How could he have missed the fact that she was so sad? He tries to share his grief with his girlfriend, Tara, but she’s too concerned with her own needs to offer him much comfort. What he really wants is to be able to turn to the one person on the rez whom he loves—his friend, David.

Things go from bad to worse as Shane’s dream of going to university is shattered and his grieving mother withdraws from the world. Worst of all, he and David have to hide their relationship from everyone. Shane feels that his only chance of a better life is moving to Toronto, but David refuses to join him. When yet another tragedy strikes, the two boys have to make difficult choices about their future together.

With deep insight into the life of Indigenous people on the reserve, this book masterfully portrays how a community looks to the past for guidance and comfort while fearing a future of poverty and shame. Shane’s rocky road to finding himself takes many twists and turns, but ultimately ends with him on a path that doesn’t always offer easy answers, but one that leaves the reader optimistic about his fate.

Reviews
“Complex, vulnerable emotion is embedded within the specificity of the writing in this dramatic prose debut. Jones avoids clichés of reservation life, humanizing the stories of how his people reconcile the trauma of suicide, missing family members, same-sex relationships, and the isolation of a community left to fend for itself. A touching story that has been a long time coming for the Indigenous community.”
Kirkus Reviews

“This complex, well-written debut will resonate with young people . . . A great coming-out novel with Native American protagonists; recommended for all teen collections.”
Jill Baetiong, School Library Journal

“A powerful, challenging book that is full of deeply meaningful turns as it boldly encourages living life to the best of one’s abilities.”
Foreword Reviews

"A stunning debut. If you loved the movie Fire Song, get ready to swoon over this movie-to-novel adaptation. The tension, beauty, desperation, hunger for someone, hunger for yourself, a family at the crossroads and a highway that's calling--it's all here. Completely riveting. Completely compelling. Adam Garnet Jones, I would follow you and your characters anywhere. Bravo! A literary and unforgettable masterpiece."
Richard Van Camp, author of The Lesser Blessed

Educator Information
Recommended for Ages 14+ / Grades 9+

Novel Themes: LGBTQ, family relationships, suicide, friendships, acceptance, sexuality, secrets, stereotyping, siblings, diversity, teens, multigenerational, Indigenous.

The Canadian Indigenous Books for Schools list recommends this resource for Grades 10-12 for English Language Arts and Physical and Health Education.

Additional Information
232 pages | 5.50" x 8.25"

A hardcover copy of this book is also available on the Strong Nations website.

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$12.95

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full-metal indigiqueer
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Oji-Cree;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

This poetry collections focuses on a hybridized Indigiqueer Trickster character named Zoa who brings together the organic (the protozoan) and the technologic (the binaric) in order to re-beautify and re-member queer Indigeneity. This Trickster is a Two-Spirit / Indigiqueer invention that resurges in the apocalypse to haunt, atrophy, and to reclaim. Following oral tradition (Ã la Iktomi, Nanaboozho, Wovoka), Zoa infects, invades, and becomes a virus to canonical and popular worksin order to re-centre Two-Spirit livelihoods. They dazzlingly and fiercely take on the likes of Edmund Spenser, Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, and John Milton while also not forgetting contemporary pop culture figures such as Lana Del Rey, Grindr, and Peter Pan. Zoa world-builds a fourth-dimension, lives in the cyber space, and survives in NDN-time – they have learned to sing the skin back onto their bodies and remain #woke at the end of the world. “Do not read me as a vanished ndn,” they ask, “read me as a ghastly one.”

full-metal indigiqueer is influenced by the works of Jordan Abel, Tanya Tagaq, Daniel Heath Justice, Claudia Rankine, Vivek Shraya, Qwo-Li Driskill, Leanne Simpson, Kent Monkman, and Donna Haraway. It is a project of resurgence for Two-Spirit / Indigiqueer folk who have been ghosted in policy, page, tradition, and hi/story – the very lives of Two-Spirit / Indigiqueer youth are rarely mentioned (and even dispossessed in our very mandates for reconciliation), our lives are precarious but they too are precious. We find ourselves made spectral in settler and neocolonial Indigenous nationalisms – if reconciliation is a means of “burying the hatchet,” Zoa seeks to unearth the bones buried with those hatched scalps and perform a séance to ghost dance Indigiqueerness into existence. Zoa world-destroys in order to world-build a new space – they care little for reconciliation but rather aim to reterroritorialize space in literature, pop culture, and oral storytelling. This project follows in the tradition of the aforementioned authors who, Whitehead believes, utilize deconstruction as a means of decolonization. This is a sex-positive project that tirelessly works to create coalition between those who have, as Haraway once noted, “been injured, profoundly.” Zoa stands in solidarity with all qpoc folk who exist as ghosts with intergenerational and colonial phantom pains – they sing with Donna Summer, RuPaul, Effie White, and Trixie Mattel. The space made is a post-apocalyptic hub of sex and decolonization – a world where making love is akin to making live.

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$18.95

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Folk-Tales of the Coast Salish
Editors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Salish; Coast Salish;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

First published in 1934, this collection of tales was recorded and edited by Thelma Adamson (1901–83), a student of Franz Boas and one of the first women to conduct ethnographic fieldwork in the Pacific Northwest. A major contribution to our knowledge of western Washington Salish oral traditions, Folk-Tales of the Coast Salish contains 190 texts from nineteen consultants—most collected in English or in English translation. The 155 stories represent Upper Chehalis and Cowlitz Salish narrative traditions, primarily myths and tales, and constitute the largest published body of oral literature for either of these groups. Adamson included as many as four variants of the same tale-type, and Adele Froehlich prepared a useful forty-three-page section of abstracts with comparative notes from eight regional text collections. Folk-Tales of the Coast Salish provides a rich data source for those interested in the content and comparative analysis of Native texts told in English. With few exceptions, the tales refer to the time “when all the animals were people.”

This new edition enhances Adamson’s seminal work with the inclusion of a biographical sketch of Adamson and of her friend and noted ethnomusicologist George Herzog, who produced the appended music transcriptions

Authenticity Note: Because of the contributions from various Coast Salish peoples, this work has been labeled as containing Authentic Indigenous Text.

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$43.50

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From Oral to Written: A Celebration of Indigenous Literature in Canada, 1980-2010
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

Aboriginal Canadians tell their own stories, about their own people, in their own voice, from their own perspective.

If as recently as forty years ago there was no recognizable body of work by Canadian writers, as recently as thirty years ago there was no Native literature in this country. Perhaps a few books had made a dent on the national consciousness: The Unjust Society by Harold Cardinal, Halfbreed by Maria Campbell, and the poetry of Pauline Johnson and even Louis Riel. Now, three decades later, Native people have a literature that paints them in colours that are psychologically complex and sophisticated. They have a literature that validates their existence, that gives them dignity, that tells them that they and their culture, their ideas, their languages, are important if not downright essential to the long-term survival of the planet.

Tomson Highway’s From Oral to Written is a study of Native literature published in Canada between 1980 and 2010, a catalogue of amazing books that sparked the embers of a dormant voice. In the early 1980s, that voice rose up to overcome the major obstacle Native people have as writers: they are not able to write in their own Native languages, but have to write in the languages of the colonizer, languages that simply cannot capture the magic of Native mythology, the wild insanity of Trickster thinking. From Oral to Written is the story of the Native literary tradition, written – in multiple Aboriginal languages, in French, and in English – by a brave, committed, hard-working, and inspired community of exceptional individuals – from the Haida Nation on Haida Gwaii to the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia’s Cape Breton Island.

Leading Aboriginal author Tomson Highway surveys the first wave of Native writers published in Canada, highlighting the most gifted authors and the best stories they have told, offering non-Native readers access to reconciliation and understanding, and at the same time engendering among Native readers pride in a stellar body of work.

QUOTES OF NOTE

“We gratefully acknowledge the work of those artists who have come before, and those that continue, building bridges across our cultures through their authentic words. Tomson Highway’s readings each demonstrate that within our stories, we pass along our teachings and we build upon the strength inside each one of us. We are arriving. Back to our lands, back to our stories, back to our truths, unwrapping old words and sharing wisdom. We, are coming home.”
—Terri Mack, Strong Nations

“A rich compilation of Indigenous literature that will be a gift for Canadian school curriculums, also well suited for those Canadians in search of understanding and reconciliation. More importantly this book is what Indigenous people need because, like me, they will discover their lives in the many stories. If I had this as a teenager, I would have understood that I was not alone in the darkness I lived. I would have seen that others found a way out. Bravo, Tomson Highway!”
―Bev Sellars, author of They Called Me Number One: Secrets and Survival at an Indian Residential School and Price Paid: The Fight for First Nations Survival

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$29.95

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From the Heart: Real Life Stories of Hope & Inspiration
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Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

"From the Heart" features true stories of ordinary people sharing their passion for life and living. The writers, twenty six in all, come from different parts of the world and from all walks of life. Their stories are deeply personal, revealing and insightful. They probe the eternal question: What gives a person hope?

Profits from this book will benefit the Cmolik Foundation established by Russ and Ellen Cmolik to make a difference in the lives of young peoples.

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$12.00

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First Nations Teaching & Practices
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: University/College;

This booklet is intended to provide readers with a basic understanding of the traditional teachings and practices of Manitoba’s First Nations people. While this knowledge has always existed, it has become increasingly important to seek it, learn it and share it, in particular with children and youth. As our knowledge increases, so does the practice, honour and respect we have for one another and for these ancestral ways.

The tools and knowledge in this booklet provide the basic information needed to begin a journey in order to rediscover the original ways that have withstood the test of time. We have searched for this knowledge by going to our Elders who carry the gifts of culture, language, history, medicines and ceremonies.

$8.00

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Franz Boas Among the Inuit of Baffin Island, 1883-1884
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: University/College;

In the summer of 1883, Franz Boas, widely regarded as one of the fathers of Inuit anthropology, sailed from Germany to Baffin Island to spend a year among the Inuit of Cumberland Sound. This was his introduction to the Arctic and to anthropological fieldwork. This book presents, for the first time, his letters and journal entries from the year that he spent among the Inuit, providing not only an insightful background to his numerous scientific articles about Inuit culture, but a comprehensive and engaging narrative as well.

Using a Scottish whaling station as his base, Boas travelled widely with the Inuit, learning their language, living in their tents and snow houses, sharing their food, and experiencing their joys and sorrows. At the same time he was taking detailed notes and surveying and mapping the landscape and coastline. Ludger Müller-Wille has transcribed his journals and his letters to his parents and fiancé and woven these texts into a sequential narrative. The result is a fascinating study of one of the earliest and most successful examples of participatory observation among the Inuit. Originally published in German in 1994, the text has been translated into English by William Barr, who has also published translations of other important works on the history of the Arctic.

Illustrated with some of Boas's own photos and with maps of his field area, Franz Boas among the Inuit of Baffin Island, 1883-1884 is a valuable addition to the historical and anthropological literature on southern Baffin Island.

$34.95

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Firewater: How Alcohol is Killing My People (and Yours)
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: University/College;

A passionate call to action, Firewater examines alcohol—its history, the myths surrounding it, and its devastating impact on Indigenous people.

Drawing on his years of experience as a Crown Prosecutor in Treaty 6 territory, Harold Johnson challenges readers to change the story we tell ourselves about the drink that goes by many names—booze, hooch, spirits, sauce, and the evocative “firewater.” Confronting the harmful stereotype of the “lazy, drunken Indian,” and rejecting medical, social, and psychological explanations of the roots of alcoholism, Johnson cries out for solutions, not diagnoses, and shows how alcohol continues to kill so many. Provocative, irreverent, and keenly aware of the power of stories, Firewater calls for people to make decisions about their communities and their lives on their own terms.

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$16.95

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From the Barren Lands: Fur Trade, First Nations and a Life in Northern Canada
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

This is a story about the fur trade and First Nations, and the development of northern Canada, seen and experienced not only through Leonard Flett's eyes, but also through the eyes of his father, grandfather, and great-grandfather.The lives of indigenous people in remote areas of northern Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan in the 1960s and 1970s are examined in detail. Flett's successful career with both the Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company provides an insight into the dying days of the fur trade and the rise of a new retail business tailored to First Nations.

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$29.95

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Fathering: Promoting Positive Father Involvement
Format: Paperback

In the past few decades, researchers and practitioners have moved away from the idea of fatherhood as a single, monolithic concept. Examining the challenges of vulnerable fathers such as those in poverty or in prison, they have developed valuable new strategies for cultivating the positive involvement of fathers in the lives of their children.

Drawing on the innovative work of Prospère, a Quebec organization that brought together fathers, university researchers, and health and social service practitioners, Fathering details innovative approaches that support positive father involvement. It provides numerous examples of strategies and interventions with fathers, lessons learned from these practices on how to better support vulnerable fathers and families, and in-depth information on ways of designing, implementing, evaluating, and disseminating the results of participatory action research (PAR) – a methodology which put fathers at the heart of the project’s decision-making.

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$39.95

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Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Vol. 1 Summary
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

This is the Final Report of Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission and its six-year investigation of the residential school system for Aboriginal youth and the legacy of these schools. This report, the summary volume, includes the history of residential schools, the legacy of that school system, and the full text of the Commission's 94 recommendations for action to address that legacy.

This report lays bare a part of Canada's history that until recently was little-known to most non-Aboriginal Canadians. The Commission discusses the logic of the colonization of Canada's territories, and why and how policy and practice developed to end the existence of distinct societies of Aboriginal peoples.

Using brief excerpts from the powerful testimony heard from Survivors, this report documents the residential school system which forced children into institutions where they were forbidden to speak their language, required to discard their clothing in favour of institutional wear, given inadequate food, housed in inferior and fire-prone buildings, required to work when they should have been studying, and subjected to emotional, psychological and often physical abuse. In this setting, cruel punishments were all too common, as was sexual abuse.

More than 30,000 Survivors have been compensated financially by the Government of Canada for their experiences in residential schools, but the legacy of this experience is ongoing today. This report explains the links to high rates of Aboriginal children being taken from their families, abuse of drugs and alcohol, and high rates of suicide. The report documents the drastic decline in the presence of Aboriginal languages, even as Survivors and others work to maintain their distinctive cultures, traditions, and governance.

The report offers 94 calls to action on the part of governments, churches, public institutions and non-Aboriginal Canadians as a path to meaningful reconciliation of Canada today with Aboriginal citizens. Even though the historical experience of residential schools constituted an act of cultural genocide by Canadian government authorities, the United Nation's declaration of the rights of aboriginal peoples and the specific recommendations of the Commission offer a path to move from apology for these events to true reconciliation that can be embraced by all Canadians.

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From the Heart: How 100 Canadians Created an Unconventional Theatre Performance about Reconciliation
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Inuit; Métis;

From the Heart - How 100 Canadians Created an Unconventional Theatre Performance about Reconciliation

Over the summer of 2013, a group of over one hundred community members from 16 to 88 years old took part in an unconventional theatre production in Victoria BC. From the Heart: enter into the journey of reconciliation was performed in a beautiful 14,000 sq. ft. indoor labyrinth made from salvaged doors and windows, trees, and hundreds of metres of fabric, all lit by paper lantern lights. In the alcoves and chambers of the labyrinth, the audience encountered songs, scenes, and shadow theatre performances created by our ensemble of non-Indigenous Canadians to tell the transformative stories that have deepened our understanding about the lived experience of Indigenous peoples in Canada. We created the show to encourage dialogue about what it might mean for non-Indigenous people to take responsibility for learning more about our own history as a first step toward standing in solidarity with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people.

This book tells the story of how the show was developed and what it was like in performance. For those with an interest in reconciliation, From the Heart offers a gripping example of how theatre can contribute to public dialogue in a creative and vital way. Community groups will be able to use the book as a model to create their own unique production of From the Heart based on the pilot project.

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$24.00

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First Nations Recipes: A Selection From Coast to Coast
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Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

Canada's First Nations peoples based their cuisine on the rich, regionally diverse bounty of the land, sea, lakes and rivers. The recipes in this book feature ingredients at the foundation of Aboriginal culture, such as salmon, venison, bison, fiddleheads, wild rice and berries, and include brief descriptions of their historic relationship with that food.

First Nations cuisine draws on millennia of evolution and deserves a lifetime of study. The recipes here represent a selection of favourites from various cultures across the country. They are inspired by traditional Native cooking, but combine historic and currently available ingredients to reflect a contemporary, modern taste.

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$4.99

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From Bombs to Books: The Remarkable Stories of Refugee Children and Their Families at an Exceptional Canadian School
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Format: Paperback

David Starr is the principal of one of the most diverse elementary schools in Canada. The students at Edmonds Community School in Burnaby, BC come from all over the world. Their parents are often refugees who have fled some of the most dangerous places on earth -- places like Sudan, the Congo, Afghanistan, Eritrea, Afghanistan, and Iraq. And like their parents, these children have often witnessed harrowing events before finding safety in Canada.

In From Bombs to Books, David Starr shares the deeply moving stories of his students, their parents, and the staff at Edmonds. He describes the upheavals many of these families have undergone. He tells us about the teachers and other support workers who have embraced them and dedicated themselves to making a different in their lives. And he introduces his students, who are surprisingly hopeful and resilient, despite the many traumas they have faced.

Sometimes funny, sometimes touching and inspirational, From Bombs to Books shares the remarkable stories of the children, the families, and the staff at an exceptional Canadian school.

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$22.95

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First Nations of British Columbia: An Anthropological Overview, Third Edition
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Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

The First Nations of British Columbia, now in its third edition, is a concise and accessible overview of BC's First Nations peoples, cultures, and issues. Robert J. Muckle familiarizes readers with the history, diversity, and complexity of First Nations to provide a context for contemporary concerns and initiatives. This latest edition of the classic work has been fully revised, with new chapters added and previous ones rewritten, arguments reframed in light of current developments, and resources brought right up to date. The First Nations of British Columbia is an indispensable resource for teachers and students and an excellent introduction for anyone interested in BC First Nations.

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$27.95

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Families Change
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Artists:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5;

All families change over time. Sometimes a baby is born, or a grown-up gets married. And sometimes a child gets a new foster parent or a new adopted mom or dad. Children need to know that when this happens, it’s not their fault. They need to understand that they can remember and value their birth family and love their new family, too. Straightforward words and full-color illustrations offer hope, support, and coping skills for children facing or experiencing change. Includes resources and information for birth parents, foster parents, social workers, counselors, and teachers.

Educator Information
Interest Level: ages 4-10.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.74" x 8.89"

$14.99

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Family
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 9; 10; 11; 12;

It is a day like any other when seventeen-year-old Melinda Jensen hits the road for San Francisco, leaving behind her fractured home life and a constant assault on her self-esteem. Henry is the handsome, charismatic man who comes upon her, collapsed on a park bench, and offers love, a bright new consciousness, and—best of all—a family. One that will embrace her and give her love. Because family is what Mel has never really had. And this new family, Henry’s family, shares everything. They share the chores, their bodies, and their beliefs. And if Mel truly wants to belong, she will share in everything they do. No matter what the family does, or how far they go.

Told in episodic verse, family is a fictionalized exploration of cult dynamics, loosely based on the Manson Family murders of 1969. It is an unflinching look at people who are born broken, and the lengths they’ll go to to make themselves “whole” again.

$27.99

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Family Violence: A Canadian Introduction, Second Edition
Authors:
Format: Paperback

Family violence is hard for most people to understand. The fact that we are more likely to be killed or assaulted by family members than anyone else seems incredible. Yet for many Canadians the family is a dangerous place, far from the haven of love and security that we would like to believe.

In this book, sociologists Julianne Momirov and Ann Duffy explore the many forms that violence can take, from physical abuse to emotional deprivation. The victims, the theories, and the factors increasing risk are all clearly presented. Policies and programs which would address this issue -- from personal intervention to institutional reforms -- are also outlined.

This new edition incorporates up-to-date statistical information on the prevalence of family violence. It reports on recent initiatives to find more successful ways to respond to the needs of victims and to rehabilitate the perpetrators.

This is the definitive Canadian book for anyone wanting to learn more about this disturbing phenomenon.

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$24.95

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For Future Generations: Reconciling Gitxsan and Canadian Law
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Gitxsan (Gitksan);

Relying extensively on the court transcripts from Delgam’Uukw v. British Columbia, her own research, and material provided by the Gitxsan Hereditary Chiefs’ office, Dawn Mills paints a compelling picture of the Gitxsan relationship to the land and their community, and their court battle all the way to Canada’s Supreme Court to prove their Aboriginal right to land and self-government. Contrary to the position taken by many legal scholars, Mills argues that the trial judgment in the Delgam’Uukw decision opened up new opportunities for First Nations people to present evidence based on oral traditions that had not been previously accepted by the courts.

While the book focuses on the judgments rendered in the Gitxsan’s struggle in the courts and an analysis of the judgments and strategies utilized, it is more than a law book. Written to appeal to a wide audience, Dawn Mills passionately shows how reconciliation can be achieved between Canada’s First Nations and the various levels of government. The lessons to be learned from this book can be applied equally to all Indigenous communities in Canada and elsewhere.

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$32.00

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From the Poplars
Authors:
Format: Paperback

In the North Arm of British Columbia’s Fraser River lies an uninhabited island. In the midst of major industry and shipping, it is central to the waterfront of British Columbia’s original capital of New Westminster passed by daily by thousands of SkyTrain commuters. Poplar Island is lush and unspoken, but storied. It is the traditional territory of the Qayqayt First Nation. Made into property, a parcel of land belonging to the “New Westminster and Brownsville Indians,” this is the location of one of British Columbia’s first “Indian Reserves.”

This is also a place where Indigenous smallpox victims from the south coast were forced into quarantine, substandard care and buried. As people were decimated the land was taken and exchanged between levels of government. The trees were clear-cut for industry, beginning with shipbuilding during the First World War. The island still serves as booming anchorage for local sawmills.

From the Poplars is the poetic outcome of archival research, and of listening to the land and the stories of a place. It is a meditation on an unmarked, twenty-seven and a half acres of land held as government property: a monument to colonial plunder on the waterfront of a city, like many cities, built upon erasures. From an emplaced poet and resident of New Westminster, this text contributes to present narratives on decolonization. It is an honouring of river and riparian density, and a witness to resilience, tempering a silence that inevitably will be heard.

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$16.95

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First Voices: An Aboriginal Women’s Reader
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

A collection of articles that examine many of the struggles that Aboriginal women have faced, and continue to face, in Canada. Sections include: Profiles of Aboriginal Women; Identity; Territory; Activism; Confronting Colonialism; the Canadian Legal System; and Indigenous Knowledges.

Photographs and poetry are also included.

There are few books on Aboriginal women in Canada; this anthology provides a valuable addition to the literature and fills a critical gap in the fields of Native Studies, Cultural Studies and Women’s Studies.

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$39.95

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Fingerweaving Basics
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Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American;

Fingerweaving has been practiced by Native Americans for centuries. It requires no sophisticated loom, only the nimble hands of the weaver. Each technique is presented in detail. The instructions are simple and clearly written, and each step is illustrated with color drawings that make the different threads easy to identify. Includes a color photo of each finished weaving. The approach used here makes this craft much more accessible to amateurs who may have wanted to try it but may have been turned off by the complexity of other books on the subject. Several variations are given for chevron stitch, lightning pattern, arrowhead pattern, bead accents, and fringe.

$31.95

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Feathers and Fools
Authors:
Mem Fox
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2;

Feathers and Fools is an allegory about how wars can begin with a simple fear of others based on misconceptions. For some time the swans and peacocks have lived peacefully by a pond. One day the peacocks begin to contemplate the differences between themselves and their neighbours. This then leads to the fear that the swans may one day change the peacock's way of life. With this fear fully ingrained in their minds, they begin to build arms against their neighbours. "We shall hurl these arrows at their throats and slaughter everyone should they ever try to change our way of life."

Upon hearing this, the swans began to build arms against the peacocks in fear that they would be attacked. The fear grew as each group acquired more and more arms against each other. The peacocks soon mistook the action of a swan as an act of aggression and thus, a war began. "Soon cries filled the sir and blood darkened the earth." When all the feathers had settled, there were no birds to be found, both swans and peacocks had been destroyed.

Foxs antiwar story touches on a common issue many nations face and how humans handle the concept of war. As history has revealed, humans have begun wars often times with very little knowledge of their opponents on the battlefield. The author artfully displays how mankind, although similar in many ways can decimate each other because of our lack of knowledge of the similarities amongst all groups. At the end of the story, Fox gives us a hopeful ending with the hatching of a lone peacock and a lone swan. These young birds meet and notice how similar they are and soon become friends. "So off they went together, in peace and unafraid, to face the day and share the world." Fox recognizes that present and future generations hold the keys to ending war.

The main characters, swans and peacocks are interchangeable with any nation, country, or people who have endured wars and their aftermaths. The book also emphasizes the importance of learning from history and not repeating it. Illustrator Nicholas Wiltons paintings bring out the beauty of the worlds of the peacock and swan. With acrylic jewel tone paints, he captures the beauty of the peacocks bright feathers and the swans graceful profile. As the story progresses, you can see the changes of the birds body language and actions helping bring emphasis on how the building toward war changes reactions and opinions of the two sides. The paintings were created to evoke the feeling of a folktale or fable with its aged looks and block style borders. Feathers and Fools is a wonderful book that could open the possibility for the discussion of topics such as war, the arms race, and similarities amongst people and their ways of lives. This book could be used at all levels for discussion.

$11.99

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First Nations Race, Class, and Gender Relations
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

This book provides an extended analysis of how changing social dynamics, organized particularly around race, class, and gender relations, have shaped the life chances and conditions for Aboriginal people within the structure of Canadian society and its major institutional forms. The authors conclude that prospects for First Nations and Aboriginal people remain uncertain insofar as they are grounded in contradictory social, economic, cultural and political realities.

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$24.95

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Funny Little Stories / wawiyatacimowinisa
Editors:
Format: Paperback

This is the first in a series of readers in the First Nations languages of the prairie provinces meant for language learners and language users. The stories in this volume come from a variety of sources, all being narrated or written by fluent speakers of Cree, whether students or instructors of the Cree language or Elders. Funny Little Stories is a collection of nine stories representing the Plains Cree, Woods Cree, and Swampy Cree dialects, with a pronunciation guide and a Cree-to-English glossary.

Students and Elders come together in this volume to offer samples of three distinct genres of Cree storytelling: word play, humorous accounts of life experiences, and traditional stories about Wisahkecahk, the trickster-hero.

Each story is illustrated and is presented in both Standard Roman Orthography and syllabics, with English translation.

Series Information
Funny Little Stories is part of the First Nations Language Readers series. With a mix of traditional and new stories, each First Nations Language Reader introduces an Indigenous language and demonstrates how each language is used today. The University of Regina Press’s long-term goal is to publish all 60+ Indigenous languages of Canada.

Additional Information
110 pages | 5.50" x 8.50" | Narrated by Cree-speaking students, instructors, and Elders | Transcribed and Translated by Cree Linguistics Students | Edited and with a glossary and syllabics by Arok Wolvengrey

Authenticity Note: Because of the contribution of Indigenous Peoples, such as Cree-speaking Elders, to this work on Cree storytelling, it has received the Authentic Indigenous Text label.

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$12.95

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First Nations in BC
Authors:
Format: Coil Bound
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: University/College;

FIRST NATIONS IN B.C: Comparing Interior and Coastal Cultures
24 units of First Nations studies at the primary, intermediate and junior high school levels.
Based on Southern Interior and Pacific Coast First Nations in B.C. Origin Legends.
Culminating Activities.Contemporary Culture. First Nations Contributions.

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$41.00

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First Nations: Art Projects and Activities
Format: Coil Bound
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

13 lessons in basic shapes and designs at the junior and secondary level, 17
projects at the elementary level.
1. Salmon model
2. Totem pole
3. Mask
4. Paddle
5. Village
6. Story
7. Symmetry
8. Complete design
9. Drum
10. Calendar
11. Christmas decorations
12. Blanket
13. Headband
14. Sun design paper fold
15. Bookmark
16. Canoe model
17. Potlatch

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$32.00

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First in Canada: An Aboriginal Book of Days
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

First in Canada is a unique expression of the many accomplishments Indigenous Canadians have made to Canadian society. As beautiful as it is informative, this perpetual calendar is a glimpse of 10,000 years in 365 days!

Informative, innovative, and inspirational, First in Canada will take readers through one calendar year of Aboriginal history, providing visuals and details of past and contemporary achievements and challenges of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples in Canada. It will appeal to those interested in Canadian history, to high school and university students, and to researchers looking to initiate projects on Aboriginal topics. Attractive and functional, this personal schedule book contains beautiful aboriginal works of art and will serve as a ready reminder of the importance of First Peoples to the ongoing cultural dynamic in Canada. Carefully researched by Jonathan Anuik, First in Canada is the first of its kind.


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$24.95

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Finding My Talk: How Fourteen Canadian Native Women Reclaimed Their Lives After Residential School
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

When residential schools opened in the 1830s, First Nations envisioned their own teachers, ministers, and interpreters. Instead, students were regularly forced to renounce their cultures and languages and some were subjected to degradations and abuses that left severe emotional scars for generations. In Finding My Talk, fourteen aboriginal women who attended residential schools, or were affected by them, reflect on their experiences. They describe their years in residential schools across Canada and how they overcame tremendous obstacles to become strong and independent members of aboriginal cultures and valuable members of Canadian society. Biographies include: Eleanor Brass, Journalist, Plains Cree, Saskatchewan, Rita Joe, Poet/Writer, Mi?kmaq, Nova Scotia, Alice French, Writer, Inuit, Northwest Territories Shirley Sterling, School Administrator/Storyteller, Nlakapmux, British Columbia, Doris Pratt, Education Administrator/Language Specialist, Dakota, Manitoba, Edith Dalla Costa, School Counsellor, Woodland Cree, Alberta, Sara Sabourin, Community Worker, Ojibway, Ontario. Dr. Agnes Grant worked with the Native Teacher Training programs at Brandon University, Manitoba, for thirty years. As an administrator and professor, she spent much of her time in remote communities. Dr. Grant is the author of No End of Grief: Indian Residential Schools in Canada and three other books. She lives in Winnipeg.

Authenticity Note: This book has received the Authentic Indigenous Text label because of the contributions of the fourteen Indigenous women who share their stories in it.  It is up to readers to determine if this will work as an authentic text for their purposes.

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$19.95

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First Fish, First People: Salmon Tales of the North Pacific Rim
Editors:
Format: Paperback

First Fish, First People brings together writers from two continents and four countries whose traditional cultures are based on Pacific wild salmon: Ainu from Japan; Ulchi and Nyvkh from Siberia; Okanagan and Coast Salish from Canada; and Makah, Warm Springs, and Spokane from the United States remember the blessedness and mourn the loss of the wild salmon while alerting us to current environmental dangers and conditions. The text is enhanced by traditional designs from each nation and photographs, both contemporary and historical, as well as personal family pictures from the writers. Together, words and images offer a prayer that our precious remaining wild salmon will increase and flourish.

Educator Information

Contents
Sherman Alexie

The Powwow at the End of the World

That Place Where Ghosts of salmon Jump

Shigeru Kayano (translated by Jane Corddry Langill with Rie Taki)

Traditional Ainu Life: Living Off the Interest

Kamuy Yukar: Song of the Wife of Okikurmi

My Village Painted on the Face of the Sky

Shiro Kayano (translated by Jane Corddry Langill with Rie Taki)

Who Owns the Salmon?

Gloria Bird

Images of Salmon and You Kettle Falls on the Columbia, Circa 1937 Illusions

Mieko Chikappu (translated by Jane Corddry Langill with Rie Taki)

Salmon Coming Home in Search of Sacred Bliss

Elizabeth Woody

Tradition with a Big "T"

TWANAT, to follow behind the ancestors

Conversion

Nadyezhda Duvan (as told to and translated by Jan Van Ysslestyne)

The Ulchi World View

Temu - The God of the Waters and the Ritual to the Salmon

Ulchi Clan Creation Myths

The Anga Clan Legend

The Salmon Spirit

Nora Marks Dauenhauer

Five Slices of Salmon

1 Introduction

2 Trolling

3 Dryfish Camp

4 Raven, King Salmon and the Birds

5 How to Make Good Baked Salmon from the River (6. Salmon Egg Puller - $2.15 an Hour)

Ito Oda with Tomo Matsui (translated by Jane Corddry Langill with Rie Taki)

Travelling by Dugout on the Chitose River and Sending the Salmon Spirits Home: memoir of an Ainu Woman

Sandra Osawa

The Makah Indians

The Politics of Taking Fish

Vladimir M. Sangi (translated by Valerie Ajaja)

The Nyvkhs At the Source

Lee Maracle

Where Love Winds Itself Around Desire

Jeannette C. Armstrong

Unclean Tides: An Essay on Salmon and Relations

Shigeru Kayano (translated by Jane Corddry Langill with Rie Taki)

The Fox's Plea: An Ainu Fable

Additional Information
204 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" | 72 b&w illustrations

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$49.95

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Foods of the Americas: Native Recipes and Traditions
Format: Paperback

For many American Indians, food is more than sustenance--it is also of vital cultural significance. Salmon, buffalo, berries, acorns, quinoa, wild rice, tomatoes, chocolate, and especially corn--where these indigenous staples flourish, they have become a central part of Native American ceremonies and creation stories.

This illuminating book, produced in association with the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, celebrates the amazing diversity of the original foods of North, Central, and South America. Winner of a 2005 James Beard Award, Foods of the Americas highlights indigenous ingredients, traditional recipes, and contemporary recipes with ancient roots. Written by chef Fernando Divina and his wife, Marlene Divina (who is of Chippewa, Cree, and Assiniboine heritage), Foods of the Americas includes 140 modern recipes representing tribes and communities from all regions of the Americas.

Some of the specialties are:
Fry Bread
Turkey with Oaxacan Black Mole
Wild Rice and Corn Fritters
Venison with Juniper and Wild Huckleberry Sauce
Chilean-Style Avocado and Shrimp Salad

To complement the recipes, Foods of the Americas also features nine illustrated short essays by American Indian writers who offer personal insights into a variety of indigenous food traditions. With enticing food photography and images from the museum’s collection, Foods of the Americas is not only an innovative tribute to the foods of the Western Hemisphere but also a gorgeous testament to the Native contribution to American cuisine.

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$34.00

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First Nations 101
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

First Nations 101 is an easy to read primer that provides readers with a broad overview of the diverse and complex lives of First Nations people. It is packed with more than 70 subjects including veterans, youth, urbanization, child welfare, appropriate questions to ask a First Nations person, feminism, the medicine wheel, Two-spirit (LGBTQ), residential schools, the land bridge theory, and language preservation. Author Lynda Gray endeavors to leave readers with a better understanding of the shared history of First Nations and non-First Nations people, and ultimately calls upon all of us - individuals, communities, and governments - to play active roles in bringing about true reconciliation between First Nations and non-First Nations people.

288 pages

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$20.00

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First Nations Education in Canada: The Circle Unfolds
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Métis;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Written mainly by First Nations and Métis people, this book examines current issues in First Nations education.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Eastern Door: Reconceptualizing First Nations Education

1. Towards a Redefinition of Indian Education
2. Peacekeeping Actions at Home: A Medicine Wheel Model for a Peacekeeping Pedagogy
3. Redefining Science Education for Aboriginal Students

Southern Door: Connecting with and Maintaining Our Relations

4. Aboriginal Epistemology
5. Quaslametko and Yetko: Two Grandmother Models for Contemporary Native Education Pedagogy
6. Language and Cultural Content in Native Education
7. Learning Processes and Teaching Roles in Native Education: Cultural Base and Cultural Brokerage

Western Door: Meeting the Challenge of Incoherence

8. A Major Challenge for the Education System: Aboriginal Retention and Dropout
9. Teacher Education and Aboriginal Opposition
10. The Challenge for Universities
11. Non-Native Teachers Teaching in Native Communities

Northern Door: Transforming First Nations Education

12. Treaties and Indian Education
13. Taking Control: Contradiction and First Nations Adult Education
14. Locally Developed Native Studies Curriculum: An Historical and Philosophical Rationale
15. The Sacred Circle: An Aboriginal Approach to Healing Education at an Urban High School

Bibliography of First Nations Pedagogy
Contributors
Index

Marie Battiste (editor), a member of the Mi'kmaq Nation, teaches in the Indian and Northern Education Department at the University of Saskatchewan.

Jean Barman (editor) is a Professor in the Department of Social and Educational Studies at the University of British Columbia.

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From the Iron House: Imprisonment in First Nations Writing
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

In From the Iron House: Imprisonment in First Nations Writing, Deena Rymhs identifies continuities between the residential school and the prison, offering ways of reading “the carceral”—that is, the different ways that incarceration is constituted and articulated in contemporary Aboriginal literature. Addressing the work of writers like Tomson Highway and Basil Johnston along with that of lesser-known authors writing in prison serials and underground publications, this book emphasizes the literary and political strategies these authors use to resist the containment of their institutions.

The first part of the book considers a diverse sample of writing from prison serials, prisoners’ anthologies, and individual autobiographies, including Stolen Life by Rudy Wiebe and Yvonne Johnson, to show how these works serve as second hearings for their authors—an opportunity to respond to the law’s authority over their personal and public identities while making a plea to a wider audience. The second part looks at residential school narratives and shows how the authors construct identities for themselves in ways that defy the institution’s control. The interactions between these two bodies of writing—residential school accounts and prison narratives—invite recognition of the ways that guilt is colonially constructed and how these authors use their writing to distance themselves from that guilt.

Offering new ways of reading Native writing, From the Iron House is a pioneering study of prison literature in Canada and situates its readings within international criticism of prison writing. Contributing to genre studies and theoretical understandings of life writing, and covering a variety of social topics, this work will be relevant to readers interested in indigenous studies, Canadian cultural studies, postcolonial studies, auto/biography studies, law, and public policy.

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$65.00

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First Nations Gaming in Canada
Editors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

While games of chance have been part of the Aboriginal cultural landscape since before European contact, large-scale commercial gaming facilities within First Nations communities are a relatively new phenomenon in Canada. First Nations Gaming in Canada is the first multidisciplinary study of the role of gaming in indigenous communities north of the 49th parallel. Bringing together some of Canada’s leading gambling researchers, the book examines the history of Aboriginal gaming and its role in indigenous political economy, the rise of large-scale casinos and cybergaming, the socio-ecological impact of problem gambling, and the challenges of labour unions and financial management. The authors also call attention to the dearth of socio-economic impact studies of gambling in First Nations communities while providing models to address this growing issue of concern.

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$27.95

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Following Nimishoomis: The Trout Lake History of Dedibaayaanimanook Sarah Keesick Olsen
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg;

Northwestern Ontario was a very different place when Dedibaayaanimanook Sarah Keesick Olsen was born in Namegosibiing Trout Lake back in 1922. Raised in a close-knit Anishinaabe community that lived off the land, she was guided by her parents and extended family in the traditional teachings of her people. Over time, though, as their ancestral homelands in the Lac Seul–Red Lake region were overtaken by settlers, the Anishinaabe faced greater challenges in carrying out their customary ways of life.

A resourceful and competent young woman, Dedibaayaanimanook adapted to the new and ever-changing world around her. She met a European man and raised a family that shared the values of both their cultures. Following Nimishoomis recounts the life of this extraordinary woman.

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First Nations Science and Ethnobotany Unit K to 10
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

FIRST NATIONS Science & Ethnobotany Unit K-10

15 individual fold outs. Each fold is designed to be used either as a total class project with direction by the teacher or as projects for individual students or teams of students. In-depth description of at least one plant native to the area, one experiment, information about plant identification, plant use and activities.

Authentic Canadian Content
$35.00

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First Nations Full Day Kindergarten
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

Over 300 pages of cultural components to complement traditional kindergarten skills and concepts:
PROGRAM BACKGROUND, Budget Categories, Integrating First Nations Studies, Cognitive Education Method, Activities, Skills and Goals, Monthly Rhythms, Sample Week, Sample Daily Routines. THEMES: Longhouse - Autumn & Winter, Longhouse - Spring and Summer, Salmon, Bears, Planning a Potlatch, Christmas Festival, Cedar, Canoes, Weaving, Drama, plus cultural materials support themes. Factual background information for teachers to read or share with students.

Authentic Canadian Content
$41.00

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Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Australian;

This extraordinary story of courage and faith is based on the actual experiences of three girls who fled from the repressive life of Moore River Native Settlement, following along the rabbit-proof fence back to their homelands. Assimilationist policy dictated that these girls be taken from their kin and their homes in order to be made white. Settlement life was unbearable with its chains and padlocks, barred windows, hard cold beds, and horrible food. Solitary confinement was doled out as regular punishment. The girls were not even allowed to speak their language. Of all the journeys made since white people set foot on Australian soil, the journey made by these girls born of Aboriginal mothers and white fathers speaks something to everyone.

Educator Information
Grades 11-12 English First Peoples Resource.

Additional Information
160 pages | 5.00" x 7.75"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

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Fingerweaving Untangled
Authors:
Format: Paperback

This publication is a welcome addition to the literature on the ancient craft of fingerweaving. Carol James, an accomplished Winnipeg weaver and teacher, has dedicated over 20 years to the art. Her knowledge and sash reproductions are based on the detailed study of historical artifacts and are housed in various heritage institutions such as the Manitoba Museum and the Musee de Saint-Boniface.

Authentic Canadian Content
$24.95

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First Nations Cultural Heritage and Law: Case Studies, Voices, and Perspectives
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit; First Nations; Métis;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Indigenous peoples around the world are seeking greater control over tangible and intangible cultural heritage. In Canada, issues concerning repatriation and trade of material culture, heritage site protection, treatment of ancestral remains, and control over intangible heritage are governed by a complex legal and policy environment.

First Nations Cultural Heritage and Law is the first of two interdisciplinary volumes exploring First Nations perspectives on cultural heritage and issues of reform within and beyond Western law. Written in plain language and in collaboration with First Nation partners, it contains seven case studies featuring indigenous concepts, legal orders, and encounters with legislation and negotiations; a national review essay; three chapters reflecting on major themes; and a self-reflective critique on the challenges of collaborative and intercultural research. It will be of interest to indigenous communities and their leaders, museum personnel and other cultural heritage professionals, academics and students, government policy workers, treaty negotiators, lawyers, and others interested in First Nations cultural heritage.

Although the volume draws on specific First Nation experiences, it covers a wide range of topics of concern to Inuit, Métis, and other indigenous peoples. Beyond this audience, it will be of interest to cultural heritage professionals; academics and students; government workers; treaty negotiators; lawyers; and others who work with or are interested in First Nations cultural heritage.

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$34.95

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