BC Core Competencies

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The core competencies along with literacy and numeracy foundations and essential content and concepts are at the centre of the redesign of curriculum and assessment. Core competencies are sets of intellectual, personal, and social and emotional proficiencies that all students need to develop in order to engage in deep learning and life-long learning. Through provincial consultation, three core competencies were identified.

In response to the BC Core Competencies we have matched some of our best titles to each competency. Please feel free to download a pdf copy for a list of all titles or peruse the selections in the categorized list here on our site.

Click here to download a pdf of: Connecting Core Competencies to Aboriginal Titles - updated

If you would like to add to our list please send us an e-mail with your selections.


A Coyote Columbus Story
Author: Thomas King
Format: Paperback
  • A trickster named Coyote rules her world, until a funny-looking stranger named Columbus changes her plans. Unimpressed by the wealth of moose, turtles, and beavers in Coyote' s land, he' d rather figure out how to hunt human beings to sell back in Spain. Thomas King uses a bag of literary tricks to shatter the stereotypes surrounding Columbus' s voyages. In doing so, he invites children to laugh with him at the crazy antics of Coyote, who unwittingly allows Columbus to engineer the downfall of his human friends. William Kent Monkman's vibrant illustrations perfectly complement this amusing story with a message.

$9.95

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A Native American Thought of It
Format: Paperback
  • Inventiveness and ingenuity from North America's First Nations.

    Everyone knows that moccasins, canoes and toboggans were invented by the Aboriginal people of North America, but did you know that they also developed their own sign language, as well as syringe needles and a secret ingredient in soda pop?

    Depending on where they lived, Aboriginal communities relied on their ingenuity to harness the resources available to them. Some groups, such as the Iroquois, were particularly skilled at growing and harvesting food. From them, we get corn and wild rice, as well as maple syrup.

    Other groups, including the Sioux and Comanche of the plains, were exceptional hunters. Camouflage, fish hooks and decoys were all developed to make the task of catching animals easier. And even games-lacrosse, hockey and volleyball -- have Native American roots.

    Other clever inventions and innovations include:

    * Diapers
    * Asphalt
    * Megaphones
    * Hair conditioner
    * Surgical knives
    * Sunscreen.

    With descriptive photos and information-packed text, this book explores eight different categories in which the creativity of First Nations peoples from across the continent led to remarkable inventions and innovations, many of which are still in use today.

$9.95

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A River Lost
Author: Lynn Bragg
Traditional Territory: Sinixt
Format: Paperback
  • A River Lost is the familiar story of an ancient culture infringed upon and altered forever by modern technology. It is a story of how the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam led to the destruction of a way of life for the Arrow Lakes Tribe.

$12.95

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A River Ran Wild
Author: Lynne Cherry
Format: Paperback
  • From the author of the beloved classic The Great Kapok Tree, A River Ran Wild tells a story of restoration and renewal. Learn how the modern-day descendants of the Nashua Indians and European settlers were able to combat pollution and restore the beauty of the Nashua River in Massachusetts.

$10.99

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Adventures of Rabbit and Bear Paws: Vol.1 The Sugar Bush
Format: Paperback
  • Adventures of Rabbit and Bear Paws: The Sugar Bush is a graphic novel based on the characters in the comic strip that appears in Anishinabek News. Artist Chad Solomon, grandson of respected Ojibwe Elder and activist Art Solomon, created two Ojibwe brothers known as Rabbit and Bear Paws. With this inaugural 32-page comic, Rabbit and Pear Paws are key players in an 18th century North American setting. The artist places the two characters in Ontario where they come into contact with English soldiers on route to Niagara. Throughout their adventures readers are introduced to stories featuring Nanaboozhoo, the Trickster. Chad Solomon draws on the Ojibwe Seven Grandfathers Teachings for the core of the story. This edition draws on the teaching Mnaadendmowin or Respect. This is a unique resource that may interest reluctant readers in finding out about Ojibwe history and teachings.strip that appears in Anishinabek News which focuses on two Ojibwe brothers known as Rabbit and Bear Paws. Ages 12+

$13.95

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Arctic Stories
Author: Michael Kusugak
Format: Paperback
  • Acclaimed Inuit storyteller Michael Kusugak weaves a tapestry of tales about ten-year-old Agatha and her accidental heroism in the high Arctic of 1958. The first of Agatha''s stories is based on one of Kusugak''s real life experiences, when an eerie, black airship flew over Chesterfield Inlet in 1958. A sleepy Agatha "saves" the community from the monstrous flying object.

    In the second story, Agatha notices the playful antics of the winter ravens and takes an interest in the many migrating birds. As the seasons change, she begins to favor more beautiful and peaceful birds of spring, until the ravens return.

    The third of Agatha''s stories takes place in the fall when Agatha is sent to school in Chesterfield Inlet, an English-speaking community south of her home. During an afternoon of skating, Agatha rescues a show-off priest, who has inadvertently demonstrated the danger of thin ice.

    The three Agatha stories resonate with the nostalgia and affection of Kusugak''s childhood memories.

$7.95

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Encounter
Author: Jane Yolen
Format: Paperback
  • When Christopher Columbus landed on the island of San Salvador in 1492, what he discovered were the Taino Indians. Told from a young Taino boys point of view, this is a story of how the boy tried to warn his people against welcoming the strangers, who seemed more interested in golden ornaments than friendship. Years later the boy, now an old man, looks back at the destruction of his people and their culture by the colonizers.

$11.50

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Environmentalists from our First Nations
Format: Paperback
  • Like the other books in the First Nations Series for Young Readers, this books offers ten short and engaging biographies of First Nations/Native activists who advocate not only for the environment but for Native rights. Their stories are full of highs and lows, triumphs and setbacks. Environmental trailblazers, these men and women are role models for children everywhere.

    The men and women profiled here are united by their work to protect the environment and to support indigenous rights. Their stories take us from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska to the Black Mesa in Arizona.

    Melina Laboucan-Massimo uses her passion to stop oil extraction in Alberta’s tar sands.
    Winona LaDuke is a voice for reclaiming Native lands, advocating renewable energy resources, and protecting Native cultures.
    Clayton Thomas-Muller is a dynamic advocate for indigenous self-determination and campaigner against tar sands extraction.
    Ben Powless brings his youthful energy and skills to addressing climate change issues.
    Tom Goldtooth protects sacred sites and organizes global direct-action campaigns for the environment.
    Grace Thorpe is a grandmother who dedicated her retirement years to keeping Native reservations from becoming nuclear waste dumps.
    Sarah James is a voice from northern Alaska defending the Porcupine caribou herd and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
    Enei Begaye & Evon Peter are married activists who work as a team on environmental issues and sustainable strategies for Native people.
    Klee Benally uses the media to empower Native communities in their fight for environmental justice.
    Teague Allston works to ensure a tribal voice is heard in Washington DC.

$10.95

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From the Mountains to the Sea: We Live Here
Traditional Territory: Kwakwaka'wakw
Format: Paperback
  • Each book in the series, From the Mountains to the Sea, supports the new BC Aboriginal Learning Standards in both Science and Social Studies.

    From the Mountains to the Sea: We Live Here is a Kindergarten resource which covers all of your Aboriginal Learning Standards in both science and social studies within the new BC curriculum.

    Click link to download a five week Kindergarten planning guide:Kindergarten FREE Download for We Live Here

    Back of book introduction:
    This book is about a river. Can you find a river on the front cover of this book? What do you know about rivers?

    Most rivers start high up in the mountains. As the water comes down the hill, it makes little pathways in the rocks and gravel. As the pathways get bigger, they join to make streams. Sometimes the streams join together to make a river. Where a river leaves the mountains the ground flattens out, and the river slows down. The river ends when it flows into the sea.

    The area in and around a river is a good place for plants, animals and people to live because we can all find food and water there. The salmon is an important food for many of us.

    Some of the plants and animals that you will find in this book are:
    Cedar trees live and grow all the way along a river, from the mountains to the sea.

    Salmon spend their adult lives out in the open sea. When it is time to lay their eggs, they swim back to their home streams. Their home streams are sometimes very close to the mountains.

    Bears walk long distances to find their food. They live from the mountains to the sea. In the fall they go to the rivers to fish for salmon.

    Eagles fly over large areas looking for food. They live from the mountains to the sea. In the fall, they go to the rivers to feast on salmon.

    Orcas live in the open sea. They swim long distances to hunt for food.
    Some orcas eat salmon.

    This book is also part of a bundled package that includes:
    A Talking Feather
    A boxed rubber stamp collection
    Bulletin board trimmers
    Click here to view the bundle: From the Mountains to the Sea: We Live Here Bundle

Authentic Canadian Content
$29.95

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From the Mountains to the Sea: We Share the Seasons
Traditional Territory: Kwakwaka'wakw
Format: Paperback
  • Each book in the series, From the Mountains to the Sea, supports the new BC Aboriginal Learning Standards in both Science and Social Studies.

    Click link to download a five week Grade 1 planning guide: Grade 1 FREE Download for We Share the Seasons

    Back of book introduction:

    From the Mountains to the Sea: We Share the Seasons is a Grade 1 resource which covers all of your Aboriginal Learning Standards in both science and social studies within the new BC curriculum.

    This book is about the changing seasons in and along a riverbank, from the mountains to the sea. You will see many plants and animals that live along a riverbank. They grow and change just as we do.

    A season is one of the four parts of the year: winter, spring, summer and fall. We all share and experience the changing of the seasons. Some changes we all make are small. Other changes are big. We all grow and change. What do you know about the seasons?

    Winter, up in the mountains can be cold. The days are short. Many animals sleep in their dens underneath the snow. Other animals are active all winter. Some birds and animals travel away to warmer places. Most plants rest during the winter too.

    Spring, along the banks of a mountain stream, is a time when the weather feels warmer. The days are longer. Sleeping animals wake up and come out of their dens. They are hungry and start looking for food. Birds and animals that went away for the winter come back. Plants start to grow again.

    Summer, along the banks of a river can sometimes be hot. The days are long. The young animals and birds are growing. They are learning how to find food and stay safe from danger. Plants are growing and spreading out their leaves and branches. Wild berries start to ripen and provide food for many of us.

    Fall, around a river estuary can be cool and windy. The days are shorter. Animals and birds start getting ready for the long winter ahead. Some fatten themselves up so that they can sleep through the winter. Others gather with their families to begin their long journey to warmer places. The salmon return from the sea and swim up their home streams to lay their eggs in the gravel. Trees, shrubs, and bushes begin to turn colour and then drop their leaves. Plants start to move into a time of rest.
    Which of the four seasons is your favourite? Why do you like it the best?


    This book is also part of a bundled package that includes:
    A set of moon posters
    A set of sort and categorize cards
    Bulletin board trimmers
    Click here to view the bundle: From the Mountains to the Sea: We Share the Seasons Bundle

Authentic Canadian Content
$29.95

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Hide and Sneak
Author: Michael Kusugak
Traditional Territory: Inuit
Format: Paperback
  • One lovely afternoon Allashua is lured into mischief by a charming but sneaky little creature.

$7.95

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Hideaway Cove (Hardcover)
Author: Brenda Boreham
Format: Hardcover
  • Join us on a mid August day, on the wild and rocky shores of the Pacific Northwest Coast. From the orca whale to the tiniest barnacle, enjoy a colourful glimpse into the lives of the many creatures that live in, and around, Hideaway Cove.

    Brenda Boreham and Laura Timmermans share with us, through words and illustrations, the many interconnections within a healthy marine eco-system.

Authentic Canadian Content
$21.95

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Hideaway Cove (Paperback)
Author: Brenda Boreham
Format: Paperback
  • Join us on a mid August day, on the wild and rocky shores of the Pacific Northwest Coast. From the orca whale to the tiniest barnacle, enjoy a colourful glimpse into the lives of the many creatures that live in, and around, Hideaway Cove.

    Brenda Boreham and Laura Timmermans share with us, through words and illustrations, the many interconnections within a healthy marine eco-system.

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

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I Am Not a Number
Traditional Territory: Anishinaabeg
Format: Hardcover
  • When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from, despite the efforts of the nuns who are in charge at the school and who tell her that she is not to use her own name but instead use the number they have assigned to her. When she goes home for summer holidays, Irene's parents decide never to send her and her brothers away again. But where will they hide? And what will happen when her parents disobey the law? Based on the life of co-author Jenny Kay Dupuis’ grandmother, I Am Not a Number is a hugely necessary book that brings a terrible part of Canada’s history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to.

$18.95

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I Help/Niwechihaw
Traditional Territory: Cree, Tahltan
Format: Hardcover
  • Written and illustrated by members of the Tahltan and Cree nations, this sweet, simple story looks at a very special relationship. A young boy goes for a walk with his kohkom, or grandmother, listening, picking, praying, eating . . . just as she does. In doing so, he begins to learn the rich cultural traditions and values of his Cree heritage.

    Leona Neilson's thoughtful text and Caitlin Dale Nicholson’s acrylic-on-canvas illustrations blend beautifully to show both the deep bond between the boy and his grandmother and the beauty of their world. Poetic, resonant text makes this an ideal read-aloud for young ears.

$18.95

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