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Indigenous History

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Spirit Bear: Fishing for Knowledge, Catching Dreams: Based on a True Story
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

Spirit Bear is off on another adventure! Follow him as he learns about traditional knowledge and Residential Schools from his Uncle Huckleberry and his friend, Lak'insxw, before heading to Algonquin territory, where children teach him about Shannen's Dream.

Spirit Bear and his new friends won't stop until Shannen's Dream of "safe and comfy schools" comes true for every First Nations student.

Dear Uncle Huckleberry,

Look up at the stars tonight. If you look closely, you'll see Shannen Koostachin lighting the way.

Shannen knew that school should be a time for dreams and that every child deserves to have a safe and comfy school, a proper education, and to feel proud of who they are. Every child is sacred.

Did you know that many First Nations schools get less money from the government than other schools? Shannen knew this was wrong. And so do I.

And like my mom, Mary the Bear, always says, when we see something wrong, we need to help make things right!

Did you know that Lak'insxw means "grizzly bear" in Gitxsan language?

Additional Information
52 pages | 216 x 216 mm

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$15.00

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The Voyageurs: Forefathers of the Metis Nation
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;

The Voyageurs: Forefathers of the Métis Nation tells an old story—integral to both the birth of the Métis Nation and to the development of Canada—in a new and engaging format. Zoey Roy has eloquently transformed the history of the voyageurs into a spoken-word performance poem which she has shared live at numerous events over the last several years. In this innovative resource, Zoey masterfully informs the reader and listener of the voyageurs’ history, background, and lifeways in a format popular with today’s youth. To fully appreciate Zoey’s masterful delivery, a DVD to accompany this book was essential. Combined with Jerry Thistle’s evocative illustrations and Norman Fleury’s Michif narration, this resource becomes a teaching tool, a work of art, and the impetus for further research all in one.

Educator Information
Grade Level: The publisher of this book recommends it for all ages.

Dual-language: English and Michif.

Includes a DVD.

Additional Information
45 pages | 10.98" x 8.42"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$20.00

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What the Eagle Sees: Indigenous Stories of Rebellion and Renewal
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: 6; 7; 8;

"There is no death. Only a change of worlds.”  —Chief Seattle [Seatlh], Suquamish Chief

What do people do when their civilization is invaded? Indigenous people have been faced with disease, war, broken promises, and forced assimilation. Despite crushing losses and insurmountable challenges, they formed new nations from the remnants of old ones, they adopted new ideas and built on them, they fought back, and they kept their cultures alive.

When the only possible “victory” was survival, they survived.

In this brilliant follow up to Turtle Island, esteemed academic Eldon Yellowhorn and award-winning author Kathy Lowinger team up again, this time to tell the stories of what Indigenous people did when invaders arrived on their homelands. What the Eagle Sees shares accounts of the people, places, and events that have mattered in Indigenous history from a vastly under-represented perspective—an Indigenous viewpoint.

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 11+.

Additional Information
132 pages | 7.50" x 9.25"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$16.95

Coming Soon
When I Was Eight
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 10; 11;

Nothing will stop a strong-minded young Inuit girl from learning how to read.

Olemaun is eight and knows a lot of things. But she does not know how to read. She must travel to the outsiders' school to learn, ignoring her father's warning of what will happen there.

The nuns at the school take her Inuit name and call her Margaret. They cut off her long hair and force her to do chores. She has only one thing left -- a book about a girl named Alice, who falls down a rabbit hole.

Margaret's tenacious character draws the attention of a black-cloaked nun who tries to break her spirit at every turn. But she is more determined than ever to read.

By the end, Margaret knows that, like Alice, she has traveled to a faraway land and stood against a tyrant, proving herself to be brave and clever.

Based on the true story of Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, and complemented by stunning illustrations, When I Was Eight makes the bestselling Fatty Legs accessible to young children. Now they, too, can meet this remarkable girl who reminds us what power we hold when we can read.

Reviews
"A searing account of assimilation policies and a celebration of the human spirit In this picture-book memoir, an Inuit recollects how she begged her father to attend the church-run Indian residential school so she could fulfill her cherished dream to learn to read... What she discovers is the school is draconian... Olemaun describes how a nun cuts her braid, changes her name, and assigns an endless list of chores... Even as she labors, Olemaun finds strength in memories of her father's love and uses every opportunity to study the alphabet and sound out words. Effective shadow-ridden illustrations capture the pervasive atmosphere of abuse, but the final picture speaks volumes about Olemaun's determination and triumph: her face appears as large and shining as the sun emerging from darkness, because she has taught herself to read... A searing account of assimilation policies and a celebration of the human spirit." — Jeanne McDermott, Booklist, April 2013

"Pokiak-Fenton's true story of her experiences at residential school, was originally told in Fatty Legs.... When I Was Eight is an even more powerful read due to its emphasis on concise, affective text coupled with Gabrielle Grimard's quietly unpretentious artwork." — Canlit for Little Canadians

"When I Was Eight is a powerful story based on the true story of Margaret Pokiak-Fenton... It is a story of a young Inuit girl who goes to a residential school and suffers terrible abuse from the nuns at the school... Through all these trials, she perseveres in trying to learn to read. One day in class she is finally able to stand up to the teacher and show her own strength by reading aloud. It is a moment of victory! Although this story may be intended for younger students who are studying the Inuit, it could also be used in upper grades when discussing social justice issues. The story ties in with anti-bullying themes as well... Highly recommended." — Lori Austin, Resource Links, Vol. 18, No. 5, May 2013

"This excellent picture book, written as a companion to the longer version of it called Fatty Legs, is a powerful way to introduce the residential school experience to younger readers." — Sally Bender, Sal's Fiction Addiction, February 2014

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 6-9.

Authentic First Peoples Resource K-9.

Grades 10-11 English First Peoples resource for the unit First Steps - Exploring Residential School and Reconciliation through Children's Literature.

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.00" x 9.00" | Colour illustrations throughout.

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$9.95

Quantity:
When We Had Sled Dogs: A Story from the Trapline - ācimowin ohci wanihikīskanāhk
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5;

When We Had Sled Dogs: A Story from the Trapline - ācimowin ohci wanihikīskanāhk takes readers young and old on a journey into the past when dog teams were part of the traditional way of life in Northern Saskatchewan. Inspired by Elder Ida Tremblay’s childhood memories, and told in English with Woodland Cree words and phrases, the story follows the seasonal cycle of trapline life.

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 5 - 10.

Delivered in English with Woodland Cree words and phrases.

Additional Information

32 pages | 9.00" x 9.00"
Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

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