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Indigenous Narratives

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Crazy Horse's Vision
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Sioux; Lakota;
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3; 4; 5;

Crazy Horse is among the best known Native American heroes. Yet many people do not know that his boyhood name was Curly, inspired by his curly hair. Curly was a leader even as a young boy, but his bravery could not prepare him for the trouble he and the other Lakota faced from the white settlers. After a fierce battle that mortally wounded Chief Conquering Bear, Curly felt called to help his people. So he defied traditional custom and ran away to seek a vision. Three days went by. Finally, as an exhausted Curly collapsed on the ground, the vision came, a rider suspended above the ground and voices coming from nowhere. It took three years for Curly to understand his vision, and this long journey gave him the strength and leadership to guide his people. Because of this powerful vision, Curly''s father renamed him Crazy Horse.

Renowned Abenaki author Joseph Bruchac tells a gripping and compelling story of how the dedicated young boy, Curly, grows into the brave warrior Crazy Horse. Sioux artist S.D. Nelson, with paintings inspired by the ledger book style of the Plains Indians, evokes the drama and tragedy of an important figure in American history.

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40 pages | 8.96" x 10.74"

Authentic Indigenous Text
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$16.95

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Dragonfly's Tale
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Zuni;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2;

After a poor harvest, two children regain the Corn Maidens' blessings for their people with the aid of a cornstalk toy, the dragonfly.

In Dragonfly's Tale Kristina Rodanas retells and illustrates a story based on a Zuni story kept alive for centuries by tribal storytellers.

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32 pages | 8.81" x 11.25"

$9.95

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Dreamcatcher and the Seven Deceivers
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Inuit; Métis;
Grade Levels: 5;

Dreamcatcher and the Seven Deceivers, the sequel to the Seven Sacred Teachings, warns of voices we can expect to hear in our dream time – voices that do not represent the Sacred Teachings.

These are the voices of Seven Deceivers who are spoken of by name. The allure of their whisperings is carefully spelled out in order that all might come to know what to listen for. Dreamcatcher and the Seven Deceivers is a carefully woven telling of how and why Creator sent Trickster to Turtle Island with a gift that would help us see the light and resist temptation. At a time before distant religions and churches came with their teachings, their commandments and their seven cardinal sins, we knew. We knew the way of the Good Red Road. We knew the right way to live; not through commandments but through Sacred Teachings – Teachings that were given to us long before their arrival. And we knew we would be tested by Seven Deceivers – what they called seven cardinal sins. We knew because we had been forewarned. And when these distant churches arrived with their teachings, their relics and their symbols, we had our own. One was the Dreamcatcher.

Rooted in humility and honesty, the creators have tried to respect the cultures and traditions of all peoples. It is our hope that this telling will unite and thus heal divisions. Prophecies tell that this is the time for One Heart, One Mind and One Drum. We, readers and authors alike, are the ones we have been waiting for. There is nobody else who can revitalize our culture and values except ourselves.

It is our hope that this telling might move readers toward greater courage and wisdom and ultimately toward achieving and understanding what is true in life’s journey.

The Seven Sacred Teachings are a link that ties all Native, Inuit and Metis communities together.

Additional Information
35 pages

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$21.95

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Gifts from Raven
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Haida;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1;

In this book, Gifts From Raven, Kung Jaadee a Haida storyteller, shares with us that Raven has given each person a special gift to share with the world. That gift is their unique talent or passion. 

Educator Information
This is an adaptation of her book Raven’s Feast for a younger audience. 

A page at the back of the book includes a few words in Haida and how to say them.

Suggested for ages 4-6

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34 pages | 9.00" x 8.00"

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$11.95

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Giving Thanks: A Native American Good Morning Message
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

For as long as anyone can remember, Mohawk parents have taught their children to start each day by giving thanks to Mother Earth. Also known as the Thanksgiving Address, this good morning message is based on the belief that the natural world is a precious and rare gift. The whole universe — from the highest stars to the tiniest blade of grass — is addressed as one great family.

Now readers of all ages can share in this tribute to the environment, adapted especially for children by Chief Jake Swamp, whose efforts to share this vision of thanksgiving take him all over the world. Chief Swamp's inspirational message, along with Erwin Printup, Jr.'s unforgettable landscapes, make Giving Thanks a timeless celebration of the spirit of nature.

Additional Information
24 pages | 7.46" x 11.01"

Authentic Indigenous Text
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$14.95

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Glooscap, the Beavers and the Sugarloaf Mountain
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq;
Grade Levels: 4;

After creating the Mi’kmaqs, the great Glooscap was certain that he had established harmony on earth. But a problem remained: the beavers had built a huge dam across the Restigouche River, preventing the salmon from swimming upriver as far as the camp of the Mi’kmaqs who had come to fish there. Young Mi’kmaq men were convinced they could remedy the situation. However, completely failing to put things right, they asked the loon to call Glooscap to help them. Will the beavers once more outmaneuver Master Glooscap?

Educator Information
Delivered in a triple-language format of English, French, and Mi'kmaw.

Roy has written his version of a Mi’kmaq legend in this story, mentioning special places such as Sugarloaf Mountain.

Additional Information
22 pages | 8.00" x 8.00"
French Text: Rejean Roy
English Text: Allison Mitcham
Kisi-Mi'kmaw wi'kek Text: Serena M. Sock
Illustrations: Rejean Roy

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Authentic Indigenous Text
$8.95

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Hold Up the Sky: And Other Native American Tales from Texas and the Southern Plains
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

Nearly all that remains of some Indian tribes of Texas and the Southern Plains are their stories. Here twenty-six tales are brought together from fourteen tribes and at least five different cultures. They are stories of humor, guidance, and adventure that have been passed down through the generations.

From the Tejas story that explains how the universe began, to the Lipan Apache tale in which a small lizard smartly outwits a hungry coyote, these stories are sure to delight young readers. Additional information about each tribe is included in the "About the Storytellers" section.

Once again Jane Louise Curry has skillfully retold traditional tales of Native Americans. Hold Up the Sky is in keeping with the style of her previous, highly acclaimed collections of Native American stories, Back in the Beforetime, The Wonderful Sky Boat, and Turtle Island. This, too, is a collection to be treasured.

Educator Information
Information on the source of each story retold by Jane Louise Curry is provided at the back of the book.

Additional Information
176 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

$14.95

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Home to Medicine Mountain
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5;

Two young brothers are separated from their family and sent to live in a government-run Indian residential school in the 1930s—an experience shared by generations of Native American children throughout North America. At these schools, children were forbidden to speak their Indian languages and made to unlearn their Indian ways. Sadly, they were often not able to go home to their families for summer vacation.

Native American artist Judith Lowry based this story on the experiences of her father and her Uncle Stanley. Judith and author Chiori Santiago tenderly relate how Stanley and Benny Len found their way home by train one summer. Inspired by their dreams of home and the memories of their grandmother's stories, the boys embark on an adventurous journey from the harsh residential school to their triumphant welcome home at Susanville, California, in the shadow of Yo-Tim Yamne (Medicine Mountain).

Awards

  • American Book Award - Before Columbus Foundation
  • Skipping Stones Honor Award - Skipping Stones Magazine

Reviews
"The real-life experiences of Lowry's father and uncle fuel this account of two Native American brothers in California, sent to a government-run boarding school in the 1930s to unlearn their traditional ways. While the book discloses a sad chapter in the long history of the disenfranchisement of Native Americans, it will also resonate with any kid who has been homesick." - Publisher's Weekly

Educator Information
Guided Reading: N
Lexile: 520L
Interest Level: Grades 3 - 5
Reading Level: Grades 3 - 4

Additional Information
32 pages | 10.00" x 8.50"

Authentic Indigenous Text
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$19.95

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Honouring the Buffalo: A Plains Cree Legend
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

"A long time ago, Our People came from the Northern Woodlands to the Great Plains looking for food," Grandfather said. "They saw that the Buffalo lived in harmony with Mother Earth the same as Our People did."

Through the Creator, the buffalo gave themselves as a gift for the sustenance and survival of the Plains Cree people. The largest land animal in North America once thundered across the Great Plains in numbers of 30 to 50 million. They provided shelter, food, clothing, tools, hunting gear, ceremonial objects and many other necessities for those who lived on the Plains.

But by 1889, just over a thousand buffalo remained, and the lives of the Plains Cree people changed. The buffalo is honoured to this day, a reminder of life in harmony with nature as it was once lived. This is the story of how the buffalo came to share themselves so freely.

Educator Information
The text is in English and y-dialect Plains Cree.  Y-dialect Plains Cree translation by Randy Morin, Jean Okimasis, and Arok Wolvengrey.

Additional Information
48 pages | 11.00" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$14.95

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How Raven Stole the Sun (Tales of the People)
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Alaska Native; Tlingit;
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3; 4;

A long time ago, Raven was pure white, like fresh snow in winter. This was so long ago that the only light came from campfires, because a greedy chief kept the stars, moon, and sun locked up in elaborately carved boxes. Determined to free them, the shape-shifting Raven resourcefully transformed himself into the chief's baby grandson and cleverly tricked him into opening the boxes and releasing the starlight and moonlight. Though tired of being stuck in human form, Raven maintained his disguise until he got the chief to open the box with the sun and flood the world with daylight, at which point he gleefully transformed himself back into a raven. When the furious chief locked him in the house, Raven was forced to escape through the small smokehole at the top--and that's why ravens are now black as smoke instead of white as snow.

This engaging Tlingit story is brought to life in painted illustrations that convey a sense of the traditional life of the Northwest Coast peoples.

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.50" x 9.60"

Authentic Indigenous Text
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$20.95

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How the Fox Got His Crossed Legs
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Dene; Tlicho (Dogrib);
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4;

Fox is howling, crying, for he lost his leg to Bear, all the people wanted to help Fox, but didn't know what to do. Raven is called upon to help retrieve his leg. Will Raven succeed in the quest for Fox's leg?

This book includes an audio and interactive multimedia CD that you can play on a CD player, PC or Mac. Also included is a Dogrib Elder telling his version of this ancient legend in Dogrib. An orthography chart is included.

Educator Information
Delivered in a dual-language format of Dogrib and English.

English translation by Mary Siemens & Rosa Mantla.

Additional Information
32 pages | 10.24" x 8.30"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
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$22.95

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How the Robin Got Its Red Breast: A Legend of the Sechelt People
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

These traditional teaching legends come straight from the oral traditions of the Sechelt Nation. Simple enough to be understood by young children, yet compelling enough for adults, they are gentle, beautifully presented cautionary tales. You'll want to read them again and again - and you'll learn a few words of the Shishalh language while you're at it.

Reviews
"Long ago, when groups of people were living in caves to keep their families fed and warm, young men set out to search for food. After days of staying awake to keep the fire going, the grandfather left in charge fell asleep, and the fire grew dim. The resident brown robin found everyone asleep the next morning with the embers barely lit. This traditional story tells how the courageous little gray robin saves the people, and is honored with the color given him." - Oyate

Series Information
This book is part of the Legends of the Sechelt Nation series.

Additional Information 
40 pages | 7.00" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
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$7.95

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How the Stars Fell Into the Sky: A Navajo Legend
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Navajo (Diné);
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2;

This retelling of a Navajo folktale explains how First Woman tried to write the laws of the land using stars in the sky, only to be thwarted by the trickster Coyote.

Educator Information
As indicated at the beginning of this book, this is a retelling of a legend told to the Najavo by Hosteen Klah, their great medicine man, at the turn of the twentieth century.

Additional Information
32 pages | 7.75" x 10.00"

$11.99

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How Things Came to Be: Inuit Stories of Creation (PB)
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4;

This beautiful compendium of tales shares eight classic Inuit creation stories from the Baffin region. From the origins of day and night, thunder and lightning, and the sun and the moon to the creation of the first caribou and source of all the Arctic’s fearful storms, this book recounts traditional Inuit legends in the poetic and engaging style of authors Rachel and Sean Qitsualik-Tinsley.

Reviews
"...[a] complete package of story-telling and art for giving voice to classic Inuit creation stories and meaningful discussion of beginnings and endings." - CanLit for Little Canadians

Additional Information
80 pages | 7.00" x 10.00"

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$12.95

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How We Saw the World: Nine Native Stories of the Way Things Began
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4;

All peoples have their own stories of how the Earth was created, what separated the land from the seas, and how the many animals, fish, and other creatures came to have their particular characteristics. The native tribes of North America are no different: they too have stories about the “way things began.” A fascinating collection of tales that explain the origins of tornadoes, forest fires, butterflies, horses, Niagara Falls, why dogs are our best friends, and even a very funny story of why owls and rabbits look the way they do.

Reviews
“Taylor tells the tale with straightforward ease: her paintings, exquisitely evocative of their primeval setting.” –Kirkus Reviews

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.54" x 11.27"

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Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$9.99

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