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The Obsidian Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Cherokee;

From the award-winning and #1 bestselling author of The Back of the Turtle; Green Grass, Running Water and The Inconvenient Indian

Thumps DreadfulWater’s world is turned upside down when Nina Maslow, the producer of a true-crime reality-TV show, turns up dead after working on a cold case that Thumps has spent years trying to forget. What’s more, someone seems set on taunting Thumps, leaving reminders of the Obsidian murder case around town. Is it possible that the elusive serial killer who murdered his girlfriend and her daughter all those years ago has resurfaced in Chinook? Or is this the work of a copycat looking to mess with Thumps by stirring up memories from his past?

Dragged back into a case that has haunted him for years, Thumps DreadfulWater is determined to solve the mystery of the Obsidian murders. But as he works the case, he begins to realize just how dangerous the person he is dealing with is—and that he might be the next target.

Thumps DreadfulWater, the sly, wry, reluctant investigator of Cold Skies and A Matter of Malice, returns in another irresistible mystery that only Thomas King could create.

Series Information
This book is from the DreadfulWater Mystery series, a mystery/detective series from Thomas King.

Additional Information
240 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$22.99

Coming Soon
Murder on the Red River
Format: Paperback

Cash and Sheriff Wheaton make for a strange partnership. He pulled her from her mother's wrecked car when she was three. He's kept an eye out for her ever since. It's a tough place to live—northern Minnesota along the Red River. Cash navigated through foster homes, and at thirteen was working farms. She's tough as nails—Five feet two inches, blue jeans, blue jean jacket, smokes Marlboros, drinks Bud Longnecks. Makes her living driving truck. Playing pool on the side. Wheaton is big lawman type. Maybe Scandinavian stock, but darker skin than most. He wants her to take hold of her life. Get into Junior College. So there they are, staring at the dead Indian lying in the field. Soon Cash was dreaming the dead man's cheap house on the Red Lake Reservation, mother and kids waiting. She has that kind of power. That's the place to start looking. There's a long and dangerous way to go to find the men who killed him. Plus there's Jim, the married white guy. And Longbraids, the Indian guy headed for Minneapolis to join the American Indian Movement.

Reviews
“More of a coming of age story than a mystery … the spare prose-poetry of her descriptions and dialogue is a lot more interesting than anything she has to say about crime or detection.”—Kirkus Reviews

“An appealing 19-year-old heroine, Renee 'Cash' Blackbear, lifts [Marcie] Rendon’s first mystery.”—Publishers Weekly

Series Information
This is the first book in the Cash Blackbear Mystery series from author Marcie Rendon.

Additional Information
208 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$23.95

Quantity:
Girl Gone Missing
Format: Paperback

Her name is Renee Blackbear, but what most people call the 19-year-old Ojibwe woman is Cash. She lived all her life in Fargo, sister city to Minnesota’s Moorhead, just downriver from the Cities. She has one friend, the sheriff Wheaton. He pulled her from her mother’s wrecked car when she was three. Since then, Cash navigated through foster homes, and at 13 was working farms, driving truck. Wheaton wants her to take hold of her life, signs her up for college. She gets an education there at Moorhead State all right: sees that people talk a lot but mostly about nothing, not like the men in the fields she’s known all her life who hold the rich topsoil in their hands, talk fertilizer and weather and prices on the Grain Exchange. In between classes and hauling beets, drinking beer and shooting pool, a man who claims he’s her brother shows up, and she begins to dream the Cities and blonde Scandinavian girls calling for help.

Reviews
"Rendon is a natural storyteller and a consummate writer, and we’re indebted to Cinco Puntos Press in El Paso for bringing the unforgettable Cash Blackbear to life. There isn’t a protagonist in recent fiction with the bearing of Rendon’s creation, and we’re the better for knowing her."—Jeffrey Mannix

"I won’t recount the terror, the drama, and the bravery of what follows. You can read the book yourself. The ending, I’ll just say, is deeply satisfying. Rendon has been working for years in the prisons with women who are incarcerated for prostitution, soliciting, and other offenses. Teaching them to tell their stories and access their inner writing voice. She’s able to convey the savagery of the system, what it does to women and their families, how deeply it is connected to poverty, and how it reaches into white rural and suburban areas as well as communities of color." —Ann Markusen, Grand Rapids Herald-Review

"Darn that Marcie Rendon but she did it again. She wrote another book featuring Renee “Cash” Blackbear which invariably led to non-stop, compulsive reading and thoughts about the 19-year-old protagonist...This is a good book. If you read it, block out uninterrupted time. It’s hard to put down."—Deborah Locke,The Circle News: Native American News and Arts

"The vivid writing and keen eye keep the pages turning and readers hoping for another book in this series."—Wendy J. Fox, Buzzfeed

"Rendon's refreshing sequel to 2017's Murder on the Red River...When [Cash] hears about a missing coed, she contacts [Sheriff] Wheaton. Since they previously worked together successfully on a murder, Wheaton trusts Cash’s sharp instincts and asks for her help in solving the case...Rendon, herself a member of the White Earth Anishinabe Nation, highlights the plight of Native Americans who were forcibly adopted by whites and Cash’s discomfort in a land that is and is not hers. Readers will look forward to Cash’s next outing."—Publishers Weekly

"In her second outing, Cash Blackbear goes off to college and finds herself embroiled in the mystery of a missing classmate. 'I'm not used to folks treating me like I'm stupid,' says Cash. But Moorhead State is another world, one slow to disclose the secrets of its initiated."—Kirkus Reviews

Series Information
This is the second book in the Cash Blackbear Mystery series from author Marcie Rendon.

Additional Information
208 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$23.95

Quantity:
A Matter of Malice: A DreadfulWater Mystery
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Cherokee;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

When a TV producer asks Thumps to assist with an episode about a local woman from a wealthy family whose death was ruled “misadventure,” he is reluctant to get involved. Then the producer dies in the exact same manner, and Thumps finds himself solving two cases.

Can a reality TV show solve a cold case?

The crew of a true-crime reality TV show, Malice Aforethought, shows up in Chinook to do an episode about the death of Trudy Samuels. Trudy’s death had originally been ruled accidental, but with ratings in mind, one of the producers, Nina Maslow, wants to prove it was murder. And she wants Thumps to help. Thumps is reluctant to get involved until Nina dies in the exact same place and in the exact same way as Trudy. Are the two deaths related? Or are there two murderers on the loose in Chinook? Thumps uses Nina’s Malice Aforethought files to try to fit the pieces of the puzzle together, and in the process discovers that she had already started work on another case close to Thumps' heart: the Obsidian murders.

Series Information
This novel is part of the DreadfulWater Mystery series from Thomas King.

Additional Information

400 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"
Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$22.99

Quantity:
One Night
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 9; 10; 11; 12;

Luna Begay is as studious and serious about her Aboriginal heritage as her sister, Issy, is outgoing and fun. When Issy convinces Luna to go with her to a party full of rich kids, Luna is surprised to end up talking with Jon, who is charming, sophisticated, and very good-looking. But the night turns bad when Jon drugs and rapes Luna.

Feeling guilty and ashamed that she will be perceived as an "Indian slut," Luna doesn't tell anyone and remains in denial until Issy figures out that Luna is pregnant. Knowing that her decisions will affect her parents and Issy as much as her own future, Luna has to work out how to deal with the consequences of that one night, and she has to do it fast.

Reviews
"A hi-lo title that reads like a Lifetime made-for-TV movie. An adequate choice for struggling readers."— Tamara Saarinen, School Library Journal

"Melanie Florence's young adult novel One Night is a powerful read for all readers. Written for reluctant readers it will be read by readers at all levels... The author explores many issues — sexual abuse, bullying, teenage pregnancy, adoption, and rape. Melanie Florence's well-written and compassionate novel does not disappoint." — Keep Calm and Novel On, Educator and NetGalley Reviewer

"I adore Luna... She never begins to act out of character but she does grow throughout the novel ... Parents and other adults [are exactly as I would expect them to be. Realistically portrayed, they are at first shocked, then incredibly supportive of Luna. Her principal and teachers are understanding and concerned with her safety. I heaved a sigh of relief at this portrayal. I work at a public high school ... and I absolutely KNOW this is how it goes down there rather than the usual judgmental way portrayed in novels. (Although the students on the other hand can be brutal - also written in the novel.) Luna's parents were so fantastic. Concern for their daughter, getting her immediate medical care, discussing realistic options for after the baby is born, and supporting Luna the whole way are exactly how a parent SHOULD react. Writing adults as they are here could encourage girls to come forward about rape or pregnancy. THANK YOU MELANIE FLORENCE! ... The inclusion of so many contemporary issues (alcoholism, stereotyping, negative branding, rape, drinking, abortion, adoption, being roofied) makes it interesting and thought-provoking the whole way through." — Mandy Peterson, Librarian

"This book deals with some serious topics that are timely and are issues teens are facing. One Night touches on aspects of racism, stereotyping, bullying, drugs, rape, and Aboriginal heritage. It would be well-paired with some recent news articles or other non-fiction pieces on any of these topics."— Chasity Findlay,, CM Magazine

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the SideStreets series. SideStreets are edgy, fast-paced novels that combine real-world themes and believable characters to make for short, heart-stopping books — sure to engage the most reluctant reader.

Interest age: From 14 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 2.9
Lexile Reading Level: HL560L

Additional Information
192 pages | 4.25" x 7.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$9.95

Quantity:
Hoop Dreams
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Playing ball is what keeps Podium Sports Academy's basketball captain going when things get rough. When there's trouble back home, Allie turns to basketball. Ditto when her relationship is in trouble or when she's at odds with her friends. But then tragedy strikes when an old knee injury resurfaces and Allie is told she might not be able to play again. With her hope of a future as an elite basketball player gone, Allie is overwhelmed with dark thoughts and feels she has nothing left to live for. That is, until unexpected support comes from two unlikely sources: her folks back home and her friends at Podium, her home away from home.

Reviews
"I'm really impressed with the writing and character development. Dialogue is realistic, and the pacing is exciting. Will be recommending more from the Podium series." — Jaime Tong, Educator at Vancouver School Board

"Allie leads a cast of well-drawn, multicultural characters, some of whom have starred in other Podium books, giving a cohesive feel to this fictional high school. The action flows naturally, alternating between scenes of intense basketball action, solitary angst, and hanging with friends. Readers will identify with Allie’s struggles and second-guess her choices, making this a valuable and worthwhile read for all teens -- elite athletes or not. Gripping, relatable and fast-paced, these books will appeal to a wide-ranging audience, particularly to teens reading below age level."— Penny Draper, National Reading Campaign

"Hoop Dreams is the perfect book for my students who need a short novel to get them engaged in reading again."— Melissa S., Educator, NetGalley Reviewer

Educator & Series Information
The Podium Sports Academy series follows the lives of super-jocks at an elite high school as they train for a future in pro sports.

Interest age: From 13 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 2.9
Lexile Reading Level: HL550L

Additional Information
136 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$9.95

Quantity:
Big Air
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Aboriginal snowboarder Jax has it made. He's in his last year at Podium Sports Academy and he's got a sponsorship from a big snowboarding company in the bag. But then his older brother, always the troublemaker in the family, shows up in Calgary unexpectedly. Suddenly Jax's sponsorship is threatened when the police come asking questions about a break-in at the house where he lives. He wants to help his brother, but will it cost him his future as a professional boarder?

Reviews
"The series is designed to connect with teens by dramatically leading them through the possibilities their choices create and offering wholesome suggestions for successful outcomes. Author Lorna Schultz Nicholson achieves this without ever appearing to be preaching to the reader. Big Air is highly recommended for any teens, and the series should be available in all middle years school libraries."  - CM: Canadian Review of Materials

"What gives this story its depth is the abiding hatred the prejudiced policeman holds for Jax. Jax sees just how easy it is for dangerous stereotypes to rule the day." Rated E: excellent, enduring, everyone should read it! — Lesley Little, Resource Links

Educator & Series Information
The Podium Sports Academy series follows the lives of super-jocks at an elite high school as they train for a future in pro sports.

Interest age: From 13 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 2.5
Lexile Reading Level: 580L

Additional Information
144 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$9.95

Quantity:
Epic Fail
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

This book tells a tough but realistic story about teen relationships and sexual assault and how social media plays a role in magnifying its impact.

In suburban Vancouver, in a multiracial mixed-income neighbourhood, three 14-year-old friends, a boy and two girls, go to a party organized by the boy's older brother. One of the girls, who comes from a mixed-race Aboriginal/Caucasian family of lower socio-economic standing, is raped, which has very serious consequences on her mental health.

Two years later, photos of the crime and the victim show up on social media and the girl's friend decides to confirm the victim's account of her experience — and confirm that the assailant was his own brother's good buddy. His actions of first remaining silent, then finally speaking up, have unexpected consequences for everyone — including him.

This novel reflects the complexities that teens face dealing with the rape culture many young men participate in and how it is intensified by social media.

Reviews
"I love the Sidestreets series, and this book is no exception. It tackles a very difficult issue that is very relevant in today's society of social media and cell phones. It's a quick read, and very to the point, and it outlines the aftermath of the horrific event, and the healing, rather than the event itself. If you haven't read a Sidestreets book, I highly recommend it. It's a great series for teens, on very real issues, and it's Canadian!" — Bailey Randolph, Librarian, NetGalley

"This book opens the door to talk about rape culture and the way that women are allowed to navigate in the world of sexuality."— Isaiah Roby, NetGalley

"In addition to the diverse protagonists, many secondary characters also bring diversity to the series."— Kirkus Reviews

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the SideStreets series.  SideStreets are edgy, fast-paced novels that combine real-world themes and believable characters to make for short, heart-stopping books — sure to engage the most reluctant reader.

Interest age: From 13 To 18

Additional Information
176 pages | 5.25" x 7.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
Push Back
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Sixteen-year-old Zaine Wyatt has a lot to be angry about. His mother walked out of his life when he was 12, and he was kicked out of his Aunt Sarah's place by his uncle. After living on the streets and getting badly beaten up, he is back at Aunt Sarah's, but Zaine is still angry, afraid, and uncertain that he has a permanent place to live. When his mother breaks yet another promise to take him back, he flees to an empty art studio he has taken refuge in before. But now it is just a storage shed, and he vents his rage by trashing the place and injures the new owner as he flees.

Facing charges and a possible criminal record, Zaine agrees to participate in a restorative justice program to keep from being kicked out again by his aunt. Zaine works to fix the damage he has caused and helps the owner's disabled grandson Lucas get to and from school, but his attempts to stay on the right side of the law are challenged by a group of teens who want to recruit him into a gang. Can Zaine complete the restorative justice program and prove himself worthy of a home, whether with his mother or not?

Reviews
"The author deals knowledgeably with restorative justice in this book, as well as the procedural requirements of the criminal justice system. This adds another dimension to the story without complicating the narrative or diminishing any of the characters."— Resource Links

"Push Back is an engaging read that will offer opportunities for discussion of the justice system."— Ruth McMahon, Librarian, CM: Canadian Review of Materials 

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the SideStreets series. SideStreets are edgy, fast-paced novels that combine real-world themes and believable characters to make for short, heart-stopping books — sure to engage the most reluctant reader.

Themes: Law & Crime, Homelessness & Poverty, Bullying, Parents

Interest age: From 13 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 4.0
Lexile Reading Level: HL600L

Additional Information
184 pages | 5.25" x 7.50"  

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
Cold Grab
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Sixteen-year-old Angelo has moved to Toronto from the Philippines to join his mother, who has been living and working in Canada for most of Angelo's life. Adjusting to a new country isn't easy for Angelo, with a new language, curfews, new rules, and pressure from a mom who seems like a stranger. Angelo's mother takes him to the Filipino Community Centre where he meets Marcus who has shared the same experience.

At school, Marcus introduces Angelo to Felix and Darius. The boys quickly give Angelo a reality check, pointing out how rich everyone else is, and how no one respects poor Filipino immigrants. They lure Angelo into running petty thefts as a way of proving his friendship. But when Angelo is accused of stealing something valuable from the house his mother cleans and she loses her job, he realizes that everyone sees him as just a punk. He wants to set things right, but how can he go against his friends without getting the law involved?

Reviews
"Cold Grab presents readers with one boy's experience in leaving behind a home he loves to join his mother in a new country. Readers journey with him as he struggles to find his place in this new-to-him world, and they can connect with the lessons Angelo learns and reflect upon the application of these lessons in their own lives."— CM: Canadian Review of Materials

"Author Steven Barwin's portrayal of adjusting to life and family in an unfamiliar environment and the perils it engenders is told in the straightforward terms we have come to associate with his sports novels. Barwin presents the clash of values and culture experienced by Angelo and how he works through it without sentiment or preaching, making a complex and nuanced situation accessible without diminishing its urgency."— Resource Links

Educator Information
This book is part of the SideStreets series. SideStreets are edgy, fast-paced novels that combine real-world themes and believable characters to make for short, heart-stopping books — sure to engage the most reluctant reader.

Themes: Law & Crime, Diversity & Multicultural, Assimilation, Peer Pressure

Interest age: From 13 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 3.3
Lexile Reading Level: HL560L

Additional Information
192 pages | 5.25" x 7.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
Girl Gang
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

After her online mischief threatens her father's job, sixteen-year-old Sasha is eager to leave for Canada with her mother. She thinks she has found a new start in CREW (Confident, Remarkable, Excellent, Welcoming), a girls' volunteerism group at her new school. But she quickly learns that the group is a front for a girl gang — and their true philosophy is to Con, Rip Off, Exploit, and Weaken the people they claim to help. Their leader, Martha, who goes by the nickname Master, is eager to exploit Sasha's computer skills for a more lucrative level of crime: stealing identities and luring and blackmailing men online.

Afraid of being exposed for her role in the crimes, Sasha is forced to stay in CREW and follow Master's orders. But when she starts getting attention from Master's crush, Sasha finds herself in more danger than ever. With only her online wiles at her disposal, Sasha must use Master's hunger for power and fame against her and bring her down for good.

This story plays out against the backdrop of peer pressure and digital media, showing readers that fitting in with a powerful group isn't worth sacrificing your safety and integrity.

Reviews
"The story is captivating, moving, full of suspense and twists and turns."— Anthony Cherrier, NetGalley

"Gang Girl could certainly have a place in a classroom library ... The language is clear and simple for an emerging or struggling reader while the content is suitable for a more mature audience." — Allison Giggey, teacher-librarian, CM: Canadian Review of Materials

"In addition to the diverse protagonists, many secondary characters also bring diversity to the series."— Kirkus Reviews

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the SideStreets series.  SideStreets are edgy, fast-paced novels that combine real-world themes and believable characters to make for short, heart-stopping books — sure to engage the most reluctant reader.

Interest age: From 13 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 3.6
Lexile Reading Level: HL600L

Additional Information
176 pages | 5.25" x 7.50"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
Ghosts: The Reckoner, Book 3
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Cole Harper is dead. Reynold McCabe is alive and free. Mihko Laboratories has reopened the research facility and works to manufacture and weaponize the illness that previously plagued Wounded Sky. People are dying. The community has been quarantined. And time is running out. What deal did Eva strike with Choch? Who will defeat Reynold and Mihko?

Reviews
"Robertson’s final installment in this excellent trilogy does not disappoint. He manages to take on important and timely themes while always keeping the reader engaged, engrossed and entertained. Fans will root for this believable cast of characters as they finally get to the truth of the mysterious goings-on at Wounded Sky. I can’t wait to see more from this fine author!”— Susin Nielson, Governor General's Award-winning author, April 2019

Educator & Series Information
Ghosts is the final novel in David A. Robertson's The Reckoner trilogy. 

Recommended Ages: 12-18

Additional Information
230 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

Quantity:
Monsters: The Reckoner, Book 2
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Cole Harper is struggling to settle into life in Wounded Sky First Nation. He may have stopped a serial killer but the trouble is far from over. A creature lurks in the shadows of Blackwood Forest, the health clinic is on lockdown by a mysterious organization, and long-held secrets threaten to bubble to the surface. Can Cole learn the truth about his father's death? Why won't Choch give him a straight answer? Where the heck is Jayne? Oh, and high school sucks.

Reviews
"Cole, 17, is an interesting main character caught in a web of deception and surrounded by threatening people and circumstances. One of the main themes of the book is Cole’s mental health and his need to deal with sometimes crippling anxiety. There are times he can talk himself down, times he needs medication and times that the support from his friends help him cope. Robertson speaks from personal experience, and so his portrayal of Cole is filled with realism as well as understanding and empathy." — CM: Canadian Review of Materials

"The ending...is so unexpected that readers will eagerly anticipate a third volume. A satisfying continuation of a moody, stylish series." — Kirkus Reviews

"Robertson’s knack for writing distinct teenage voices also provides important character development — a tough requirement for the middle volume of any trilogy, in which plot resolution is usually minimal. The dialogue between Cole and his friends also uncovers the different ways in which folks grieve both those they’ve lost and the culture they’ve left behind. "— Nyala Ali, Winnipeg Free Press

Educator & Series Information
Monsters is the second novel in David A. Robertson's The Reckoner trilogy. It is the follow-up to Strangers.

The Canadian Indigenous Books for Schools list recommends this resource for Grades 9-12 English Language Arts.

Additional Information
260 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

Quantity:
Trickster Drift
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Haisla (Kitamaat);
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Following the Scotiabank Giller Prize-shortlisted Son of a Trickster comes Trickster Drift, the second book in Eden Robinson's captivating Trickster trilogy.

In an effort to keep all forms of magic at bay, Jared, 17, has quit drugs and drinking. But his troubles are not over: now he's being stalked by David, his mom's ex--a preppy, khaki-wearing psycho with a proclivity for rib-breaking. And his mother, Maggie, a living, breathing badass as well as a witch, can't protect him like she used to because he's moved away from Kitimat to Vancouver for school.

Even though he's got a year of sobriety under his belt (no thanks to his enabling, ever-partying mom), Jared also struggles with the temptation of drinking. And he's got to get his grades up, find a job that doesn't involve weed cookies, and somehow live peacefully with his Aunt Mave, who has been estranged from the family ever since she tried to "rescue" him as a baby from his mother. An indigenous activist and writer, Mave smothers him with pet names and hugs, but she is blind to the real dangers that lurk around them--the spirits and supernatural activity that fill her apartment.

As the son of a Trickster, Jared is a magnet for magic, whether he hates it or not--he sees ghosts, he sees the monster moving underneath his Aunt Georgina's skin, he sees the creature that comes out of his bedroom wall and creepily wants to suck his toes. He also still hears the Trickster in his head, and other voices too. When the David situation becomes a crisis, Jared can't ignore his true nature any longer.

Reviews
“As with the first book, Trickster Drift is most memorable for its set pieces. . . . The mix of sharp comedy, quick character sketches, and unsettling horror is note-perfect.” —Nathan Whitlock, Quill & Quire.

"The great strength of Trickster Drift is that humanity and empathy, but let’s be clear: there are monsters here, both human and otherwise. The novel builds to a climax that is simultaneously thrilling and thought-provoking, one which overturns much of what we have come to know. The third novel can’t come soon enough." — Robert J. Wiersema, The Star

Series Information
This is the second book in Eden Robinson's Trickster Trilogy.

Additional Information
384 pages | 6.30" x 9.31"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$32.00

Quantity:
Trust Your Name
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Choctaw;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11;

After Bobby Byington's unforgettable winning high school season, Coach Robison recruits Choctaw players from several communities to play in a summer league. Coach selects the Panther as the team's mascot, saying, "To many Choctaws, young and old, the Panther is an elder watching over us, helping us when we are in need." As the team gels and they move to the national tournament, they find out they are up against more than other basketball teams. They must deal with racist taunts and unfair sportsmanship on the court. The situation comes to a head when, on the eve of a key game against a bullying opponent, two Choctaw players are arrested for robbery. Never doubting their innocence, Coach Robison asks, "Who can we trust, and how can we find the truth?"

Educator Information 
Reading Level: 2.5 

Recommended Ages: 12-16 

Series Information
This is the fourth book in the No Name series, which is part of the PathFinders series. The PathFinders series of Hi-Lo (high interest, low readability) novels offers the following features: 

• Indigenous teen protagonists
• Age appropriate plots
• 2.5 – 4.5 Reading Level
• Contemporary and historical fiction
• Indigenous authors

The PathFinders series is from an American publisher. Therefore, Indigenous terminology in the PathFinders books is not the same as Canadian Indigenous terminology. This prompts a useful teaching moment for educators in discussing appropriate terminology use in Canada.  The recommended ages for books in the PathFinders series are 12-16.

Additional Information
166 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$12.95

Quantity:
Cold Skies: A DreadfulWater Mystery
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Cherokee;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Thumps DreadfulWater has finally found some peace and quiet. His past as a California cop now far behind him, he’s living out his retirement as a fine-arts photographer in the small town of Chinook. His health isn’t great, and he could use a new stove, but as long as he’s got his cat and a halfway decent plate of eggs, life is good.

All that changes when a body turns up on the eve of a major water conference and the understaffed sheriff’s department turns to Thumps for help. Thumps wants none of it, but even he is intrigued when he learns the deceased was developing a new technology that could revolutionize water and oil drilling . . . and that could also lose some very powerful people a lot of money. As strangers begin to pour into Chinook for the conference, Thumps finds himself sinking deeper and deeper into a conflict between secretive players who will kill to get what they want.

In Cold Skies, the sly, wry, reluctant investigator of DreadfulWater and The Red Power Murders returns for another irresistible mystery that only Thomas King could tell.

Reviews
“Whimsical and wry, large-hearted and at times laugh out loud funny, but with an underlying gravitas and significance.” — Quill & Quire

“Even armchair sleuths who can see the solution from a mile away will appreciate GoodWeather’s unerring knack for converting social, racial, and economic conflict into blissful farce.”— Kirkus Reviews

Series Information
This novel is part of the DreadfulWater Mystery series from Thomas King.

Additional Information
464 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$22.99

Quantity:
Hope's Journey
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

It's 1791. The year a new province is created in the country that will one day be called Canada. The year Hope Cobman's life turns around. At thirteen, she must leave the orphanage where she has lived since her mother's death one year ago. Alone in the world, she dreams of finding her father and three brothers - all complete strangers to her, for even before her birth the American Revolution had scattered her family. Forced into becoming an indentured servant, she is little more than a slave to a lonely man and his bitter, crippled mother. Finally set free, she sets off on her own. But instead of finding a father and a brother who will take care of her, she learns that it is up to her to help them recover from the wounds of war. Along the way, she discovers her own strength. For Hope, and for all the Loyalists of Upper Canada, a brighter future lies ahead.

Series Information
This is the fifth book in the "Forging a Nation" series. Other titles in this series include The Way Lies North, Broken Trail, Freedom Bound, and The White Oneida.

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220 pages | 7.63" x 5.25"

Please Note: While Indigenous peoples are mentioned and/or included in this story, this book's content does not focus prominently on Indigenous peoples.

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A Name Earned
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Choctaw;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11;

After overcoming years of trouble with his alcoholic father and surviving a near-death car accident, Bobby Byington - for the first time in his life - has a strong family. His parents are reunited, his father has turned away from the bottle, and he is a starter on the basketball team at his high school.

But the door to trouble never stays closed. Bobby's girlfriend, next-door-neighbor Faye, suffers attacks from a bullying classmate, and some of Bobby's basketball teammates are dealing with family problems that are all too familiar to him. Maybe Bobby's old backyard hideout will need to be uncovered again and the door reopened.

Hoping to help his friends, Bobby shares the Choctaw legend of No Name that Coach Robison had told him back when Bobby needed to hide from his father. Who knew Coach's wisdom would become so meaningful to others?

As the playoffs near and the team plays to win, Coach delivers a message that extends well beyond the basketball court: "Your life is carved by the choices you make. You earn your name by your actions."

Educator Information
Reading Level: 2.5

Recommended Ages: 12-16

Series Information
This is the third book in the No Name series, which is part of the PathFinders series. The PathFinders series of Hi-Lo (high interest, low readability) novels offers the following features: 

• Indigenous teen protagonists
• Age appropriate plots
• 2.5 – 4.5 Reading Level
• Contemporary and historical fiction
• Indigenous authors

The PathFinders series is from an American publisher. Therefore, Indigenous terminology in the PathFinders books is not the same as Canadian Indigenous terminology. This prompts a useful teaching moment for educators in discussing appropriate terminology use in Canada.  The recommended ages for books in the PathFinders series are 12-16.

Additional Information
160 pages | 4.50" x 7.00"

 

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The Long Run
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11;

Follow Travis Hawk on a cross-country trek as he escapes a world of brutality and uncertainty and puts his trust, and even his very life, in the hands of total strangers. Travis's story is one of struggle, survival, risk, and resilience, navigating a solo journey of hundreds of miles to seek a safe haven, far from the demons of his past.

Reviews
"The Long Run is a stirring story about a young man who empowers himself to succeed against the odds. Travis Hawk is a pathfinder indeed."
Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education, August 2017

Educator Information
Reading Level: 2.5

Recommended Ages: 12 to 16

This book is a PathFinders series Hi/Lo reader, a high interest, low readability book that supports reluctant or struggling readers.

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120 pages | 4.50" x 7.00"

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Strangers: The Reckoner, Book 1
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

When Cole Harper is compelled to return to Wounded Sky First Nation, he finds his community in chaos: a series of shocking murders, a mysterious illness ravaging the residents, and reemerging questions about Cole’s role in the tragedy that drove him away 10 years ago. With the aid of an unhelpful spirit, a disfigured ghost, and his two oldest friends, Cole tries to figure out his purpose, and unravel the mysteries he left behind a decade ago. Will he find the answers in time to save his community?

Reviews
"Within the very opening pages of Strangers, Cole Harper had already burrowed his way deep into my heart. I raced through the chapters, fearing for this young hero, his friends, and his wider community. David Robertson has written a riveting story of a young man burdened with adult responsibilities. Robertson’s true skill, though, comes in the way he balances the intense peril with humour and magic and love and resilience. Teachers, get this novel into your classrooms. I want everyone to read Strangers." — Angie Abdou, author of In Case I Go 

 
"Strangers has it all - vivid and imaginatively crafted characters, a propulsive and energetic plot, brilliant dialogue, and a series of mysteries that make us think in a new way about the world we inhabit. The story skillfully unfolds, and the characters - the spirit beings and the human ones - are utterly convincing. This book is a page-turner and lingers in the memory. Strangers will resonate with and enthrall everyone, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous readers." —Warren Cariou, Canada Research Chair and Director, Centre for Creative Writing and Oral Culture, University of Manitoba

Educator & Series Information
Strangers is the first novel in The Reckoner trilogy.

The Canadian Indigenous Books for Schools list recommends this resource for Grades 9-12 English Language Arts.

Additional Information
233 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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Algonquin Sunset: An Algonquin Quest Novel
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10;

Anokì and his sister Pangì Mahingan have grown up, and now face a decision that will change their lives forever.

Twelve years after Mahingan was wounded battling for his life against the Haudenosaunee warrior known as Ö:nenhste Erhar (Corn Dog), we rejoin his family and learn what fate held for him.

Now, his children, Anokì and Pangì Mahingan, along with their twin cousins Makwa and Wàbek, are grown and have adult responsibilities. Still living with their Algonquin family, they have become a formidable fighting unit with the addition of three Mi´kmaq warriors, E´s, Jilte´g, and the fierce Elue´wiet Ga´qaquj.

However, there is danger in the land of the setting sun, and nothing is more dangerous than what the family is going to encounter from the fierce enemy of their new Anishinaabe allies: the Lakȟóta.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 12-15.

Series Information
This novel is part of the Algonquin Quest Series, a series of young adult novels from Algonquin author Rick Revelle.

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304 pages | 5.00" x 8.00"

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Danny Blackgoat: Dangerous Passage
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11;

In the 1860s the United States Army forced thousands of Navajos off their land and imprisoned them in unsafe conditions at Fort Sumner. Through the eyes of teenager Danny Blackgoat, readers experience how the Diné people struggled to survive.

In the concluding novel of the Danny Blackgoat trilogy, the major characters appear in a final scene of reckoning. Danny Blackgoat must face the charge of stealing a horse from Fort Davis––or reveal that his old friend, Jim Davis, stole the horse to help Danny escape. The penalty for horse theft in the 1860s? Death by hanging. Only the word of a Navajo woman can save both Danny and Jim Davis, but will she arrive at Fort Sumner before the bugles sound and the hanging begins?

Danny Blackgoat: Dangerous Passage is filled with history-based action, as the Diné people leave their imprisonment and return to Navajo country.

Series Information
This is the third book in the Danny Blackgoat series, which is part of the PathFinders series. The PathFinders series of Hi-Lo (high interest, low readability) novels offers the following features: 

• Indigenous teen protagonists
• Age appropriate plots
• 2.5 – 4.5 Reading Level
• Contemporary and historical fiction
• Indigenous authors

The PathFinders series is from an American publisher. Therefore, Indigenous terminology in the PathFinders books is not the same as Canadian Indigenous terminology. This prompts a useful teaching moment for educators in discussing appropriate terminology use in Canada.  The recommended ages for books in the PathFinders series are 12-16.

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162 pages | 4.50" x 7.00"

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Son of a Trickster (PB)
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Haisla (Kitamaat);
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize: With striking originality and precision, Eden Robinson, the author of the classic Monkey Beach and winner of the Writers’ Trust of Canada Fellowship, blends humour with heartbreak in this compelling coming-of-age novel. Everyday teen existence meets indigenous beliefs, crazy family dynamics, and cannibalistic river otters...The exciting first novel in her trickster trilogy.

Everyone knows a guy like Jared: the burnout kid in high school who sells weed cookies and has a scary mom who's often wasted and wielding some kind of weapon. Jared does smoke and drink too much, and he does make the best cookies in town, and his mom is a mess, but he's also a kid who has an immense capacity for compassion and an impulse to watch over people more than twice his age, and he can't rely on anyone for consistent love and support, except for his flatulent pit bull, Baby Killer (he calls her Baby)--and now she's dead.

Jared can't count on his mom to stay sober and stick around to take care of him. He can't rely on his dad to pay the bills and support his new wife and step-daughter. Jared is only sixteen but feels like he is the one who must stabilize his family's life, even look out for his elderly neighbours. But he struggles to keep everything afloat...and sometimes he blacks out. And he puzzles over why his maternal grandmother has never liked him, why she says he's the son of a trickster, that he isn't human. Mind you, ravens speak to him--even when he's not stoned.

You think you know Jared, but you don't.

Reviews
“Eden Robinson’s Son of a Trickster is a novel that shimmers with magic and vitality, featuring a compelling narrator, somewhere between Holden Caulfield and Harry Potter. Just when you think Jared’s teenage journey couldn’t be more grounded in gritty, grinding reality, his addled perceptions take us into a realm beyond his small-town life, somewhere both seductive and dangerous. Energetic, often darkly funny, sometimes poignant, this is a book that will resonate long after the reader has devoured the final page.” —2017 Scotiabank Giller Prize jury (André Alexis, Anita Rau Badami, Lynn Coady, and Richard Beard)

Educator & Series Information
This is the first book in Eden Robinson's Trickster Trilogy.

Grades 11-12 BC English First Peoples resource for the unit What Creates Family. 

Note: This novel contains mature subject matter, such as drug use and depictions of sex and violence.

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336 pages | 5.20" x 8.00"

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Rez Runaway
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Raised on a reserve in northern Ontario, seventeen-year-old Joe Littlechief tries to be like the other guys. But Joe knows he's different -- he's more interested in guys than in any of the girls he knows. One night Joe makes a drunken pass at his best friend Benjy and, by the next morning, everyone on the rez is talking about Joe. His mother, a devout Christian, is horrified, and the kids who are supposed to be his friends make it clear there's no place for him in their circle, or even on the rez. Joe thinks about killing himself, but instead runs away to the city.

Alone and penniless on the streets of Toronto, Joe comes to identify with the Aboriginal idea of having two spirits, or combining both feminine and masculine identities in one person. He also begins to understand more about how his parents have been affected by their own experiences as children in residential schools -- something never discussed on the rez. And he realizes he has to come to terms with his two-spiritedness and find people who accept him for who he is.

This is a novel that reflects the complex realities faced by young LGBTQ and aboriginal youth today.

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Billy Buckhorn: Supranormal
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Cherokee;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Billy Buckhorn's uncanny intuition became apparent at an early age. In the course of this exciting series, Billy's supernatural abilities grow and develop, and his reputation as a gifted "holy man" in the Old Way spreads throughout the Cherokee Nation. In book 3, Supranormal, Billy and his grandfather Wesley face a deadly, ancient beast that's poised to take control of the world. While Wesley and Billy summon aid from the spirit realms, Billy's father, a college professor, puts together an archaeological team to help out - and to document the unprecedented things they've seen and experienced. But even with everyone pulling together, can they stop Uktena?

Series Information
This novel is part of the Billy Buckhorn series, which is part of the PathFinder series. The PathFinders series of Hi-Lo (high interest, low readability) novels offers the following features: 

• Indigenous teen protagonists
• Age appropriate plots
• 2.5 – 4.5 Reading Level
• Contemporary and historical fiction
• Indigenous authors

The PathFinders series is from an American publisher. Therefore, Indigenous terminology in the PathFinders books is not the same as Canadian Indigenous terminology. This prompts a useful teaching moment for educators in discussing appropriate terminology use in Canada.  The recommended ages for books in the PathFinders series are 12-16.

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128 pages | 4.50" x 7.00"

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Algonquin Spring: An Algonquin Quest Novel
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10;

Years after a devastating battle, Mahingan and his tribe struggle to recover a lost loved one.

Six years earlier in the fourteenth century, Mahingan and his tribe fought the Battle of the Falls against the Haudenosaunee. There were many losses, and Mahingan thought he had lost his wife, Wàbananang (Morning Star). But after the battle, he learned she was still alive, taken captive by the Haudenosaunee. Now on a desperate quest to rescue her, Mahingan and his small family are wintering north of the Ottawa River near present-day Lachute, Quebec. If they are to have any hope of recovering Wàbananang, though, they must first survive until spring.

At the same time, over 2,000 kilometres away in present-day Newfoundland, events taking place will affect four Native tribes: Mahingan’s, a group of Mi’kmaq, a Beothuk group, and a band of Haudenosaunee warriors led by Mahingan’s old nemesis, Ò:nenhste Erhar (Corn Dog) — a fierce Mohawk War Chief and Wàbananang’s captor.

Along the way, Mahingan’s brother, Mitigomij, will reveal his true self and powers. Then, an influential Mi’kmaq legend puts a new, powerful twist on events, and threatens to send things spiraling out of Mahingan’s control.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 12-15.

Series Information
This novel is part of the Algonquin Quest Series, a series of young adult novels from Algonquin author Rick Revelle.

Additional Information
296 pages | 5.00" x 8.00"

 

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Fire Fight
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10;

After her ikusin (grandmother) dies, Kai Hunter, a part-Navajo, part-Stoney Nakoda 16-year-old, runs away to Banff, Alberta, to avoid being placed in a foster home. Kai lies her way into a new identity, a job, and a safe place to live. She makes new friends and volunteers with a rapid attack crew for the forestry service. She even meets a great guy named Rory, who's into motorcycles, just like her - and who seems to be into her, too. But Kai is scared of being found out, and she isn't sure that she can trust all of her new friends...or that she likes the person she's pretending to be. Meanwhile, she's got to pay rent, figure out whether Rory is boyfriend material, and assist the rap-attack crew as they face a string of suspicious forest fires. In the thrilling conclusion to this romantic adventure, Kai's choices become matters of life and death.

R.L. 3.5

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Hannah and the Wild Woods
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Salish;
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8;

It's spring break, and 14-year-old Hannah Anderson is glad to be spending it with the "Coast-Is-Clear" program - a group committed to cleaning Pacific Rim National Park's beaches of debris leftover from the tragic Japanese tsunami of 2011. Soon after Hannah arrives on the west coast, Jack, her raven sidekick, finds a small object washed up in the surf: a strange glass ball marked with a glowing Japanese character. Immediately, unusual things start to happen, beginning with the arrival of the mysterious "Kimiko," a Japanese girl with a secret past. Kimiko, it turns out, is a kitsune fox whose magic depends on the glass ball she lost in the tsunami. As Kimiko works alongside Hannah and the other members of her crew, she becomes increasingly unhappy with her life as an immortal kistsune and longs to join a family of humans. Can Hannah and her trickster raven help to make it happen?

Series Information
This is the third book in the Hannah Series, a juvenile fiction novel series.

Additional Information
240 pages | 5.50" x 7.63"

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Billy Buckhorn: Paranormal
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Cherokee;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11;

In this second installment in the series, Billy and his friend Chigger continue their adventures in a hidden cave. After a horrifying accident at the cave, Billy is pronounced clinically dead on an operating table. After being revived, he discovers an ability to see and speak with the spirits of the dead including his deceased Cherokee grandmother. When Chigger becomes possessed by an alien creature, Billy knows he must return to the cave to save his friend. What he doesn’t know is that the Horned Serpent known to the Cherokees as Uktena is lying in wait.

Ages: 12 to 16 / Reading level: 4.5

Series Information
This novel is part of the Billy Buckhorn series, which is part of the PathFinder series. The PathFinders series of Hi-Lo (high interest, low readability) novels offers the following features: 

• Indigenous teen protagonists
• Age appropriate plots
• 2.5 – 4.5 Reading Level
• Contemporary and historical fiction
• Indigenous authors

The PathFinders series is from an American publisher. Therefore, Indigenous terminology in the PathFinders books is not the same as Canadian Indigenous terminology. This prompts a useful teaching moment for educators in discussing appropriate terminology use in Canada.  The recommended ages for books in the PathFinders series are 12-16.

Additional Information
120 pages | 4.50" x 7.00"

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$12.95

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Danny Blackgoat, Rugged Road to Freedom
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11;

This second volume of a three-part series continues the dramatic story of Danny Blackgoat, a Navajo teenager who, after being labeled a troublemaker, is taken prisoner during the Long Walk of 1864. Danny escaped from Fort Davis in volume one (Danny Blackgoat, Navajo Prisoner), but he must still face many obstacles in order to rescue his family and find freedom.

Whether it’s soldiers and bandits chasing him or the dangers of the harsh desert climate, Danny ricochets from one bad situation to the next,but his bravery doesn’t falter and he never loses faith.

Educator Information
Like all PathFinders novels for reluctant teen readers, this contemporary story is by a Native American author, features a linear plot, and is written at a 4.0 to 4.5 reading level.

Series Information
This is the second book in the Danny Blackgoat series, which is part of the PathFinders series. The PathFinders series of Hi-Lo (high interest, low readability) novels offers the following features: 

• Indigenous teen protagonists
• Age appropriate plots
• 2.5 – 4.5 Reading Level
• Contemporary and historical fiction
• Indigenous authors

The PathFinders series is from an American publisher. Therefore, Indigenous terminology in the PathFinders books is not the same as Canadian Indigenous terminology. This prompts a useful teaching moment for educators in discussing appropriate terminology use in Canada.  The recommended ages for books in the PathFinders series are 12-16.

Additional Information
144 pages | 4.50" x 7.00"

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$11.95

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Walking Two Worlds
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11;

This work of historical fiction is based on the true, inspiring story of the early education of Seneca leader Ely Parker. Hasanoanda was his Indian name, but in mission school he became “Ely.”

Despite the racism and deceit he faced, he never gave up his mission to receive an education that would enable him to aid the Seneca people in their quest to keep their land. As a young person, he learned how to live in the world of the white man, but never forgot his Seneca roots.

Also included is an afterword that highlights the careers and achievements of Ely Parker’s adult life.

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Son Who Returns
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11;

Fifteen-year-old Mark Centeno is of Chumash, Crow, Mexican, and Filipino ancestry - he calls himself "four kinds of brown." When Mark goes to live with his Chumash grandmother on the reservation in central California, he discovers a rich world of family history and culture that he knows very little about. He also finds a pathway to better understanding a part of his own identity: the world of powwow dancing. Riveted by the traditional dancers and feeling the magnetic pull of the drums, Mark begins the training and other preparations necessary for him to compete as a dancer in one of America's largest powwows. Like all of our PathFinders novels for reluctant teen readers, this contemporary story is by a Native American author, features a linear plot, and is written at a 4.0 to 4.5 reading level.

Reading Level: 4.0

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No Name
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Choctaw; Cherokee;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11;

Inspired by the traditional Choctaw story "No Name," this modern adaptation features a present-day Choctaw teenager surviving tough family times--his mother splits, leaving him with a mean-spirited, abusive father. The one place the teen can find peace is on the neighborhood basketball court. But after a violent confrontation with his father, the teen runs away, only to return home to find an unexpected hiding spot in his own backyard. His hiding spot becomes his home for weeks, until the help and encouragement of a basketball coach, a Cherokee buddy, and a quiet next-door girlfriend help him to face his father.

Reading Level: 4.0

Series Information
This is the first book in the No Name series, which is part of the PathFinders series. The PathFinders series of Hi-Lo (high interest, low readability) novels offers the following features: 

• Indigenous teen protagonists
• Age appropriate plots
• 2.5 – 4.5 Reading Level
• Contemporary and historical fiction
• Indigenous authors

The PathFinders series is from an American publisher. Therefore, Indigenous terminology in the PathFinders books is not the same as Canadian Indigenous terminology. This prompts a useful teaching moment for educators in discussing appropriate terminology use in Canada.  The recommended ages for books in the PathFinders series are 12-16.

Additional Information
168 pages | 4.50" x 7.00"

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Billy Buckhorn: Abnormal
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Cherokee;
Grade Levels: 6; 7; 8; 9; 10; 11;

Book one of the Billy Buckhorn series introduces a Cherokee teen who uses his supernatural abilities to solve mysteries. In Abnormal, Billy is struck by lightning while fishing with his friend Chigger. He survives the lightning strike but begins to experience an enhanced level of ESP. Billy is labeled "abnormal" by one of his teachers after he uncovers an unsavory secret from the teacher's past. What no one suspects is the teacher is a shape-shifter who becomes a raven that gains strength from his victims' fear. When Billy confronts the teacher, he must channel his own fear into anger in order to defeat the evil raven.

Series Information
This novel is part of the Billy Buckhorn series, which is part of the PathFinder series. The PathFinders series of Hi-Lo (high interest, low readability) novels offers the following features: 

• Indigenous teen protagonists
• Age appropriate plots
• 2.5 – 4.5 Reading Level
• Contemporary and historical fiction
• Indigenous authors

The PathFinders series is from an American publisher. Therefore, Indigenous terminology in the PathFinders books is not the same as Canadian Indigenous terminology. This prompts a useful teaching moment for educators in discussing appropriate terminology use in Canada.  The recommended ages for books in the PathFinders series are 12-16.

Additional Information
172 pages | 4.50" x 7.00"

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$12.95

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The White Oneida
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

In her fourth historical novel dealing with British North America and the American Revolution, Jean Rae Baxter focuses on Broken Trail, a young boy who was born white but captured and adopted by the Oneida people. The great Mohawk leader Thayendanegea – known to Euro-Canadians as Joseph Brant – has chosen Broken Trail to assist him in the daunting task of uniting all the tribes and nations with the goal of establishing a country of their own. In preparation, Broken Trail must attend a Christian boarding school for native youth, where he soon finds that he has to gain the trust of young men from many different tribes whose ancient enmities lie barely concealed beneath the surface. With the help of Yellowbird, the only woman student, he discovers that the school – racist in the extreme – is a place of secrets where appearances can be deceiving and loyalty is sometimes proven in unexpected ways. As a first step, Brant sends Broken Trail on a long journey to meet with Tecumseh, the young Shawnee leader, to begin the work of union. In this tale of intrigue and adventure, Baxter once again demonstrates her ability to convert the past into living history.

Series Information
This is the fourth book in the "Forging a Nation" series. Other titles in this series include The Way Lies North, Broken Trail, Freedom Bound, and Hope's Journey.

Additional Information
280 pages | 5.75" x 7.62"

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I Am Algonquin: An Algonquin Quest Novel
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10;

This book paints a vivid picture of the original peoples of North America before the arrival of Europeans. The novel follows the story of Mahingan and his family as they live the traditional Algonquin way of life in what is now Ontario in the early 14th century. Along the way we learn about the search for moose and the dramatic rare woodland buffalo hunt, conflicts with other Native nations, and the dangers of wolves and wolverines. We also witness the violent game of lacrosse, the terror of a forest fire, and the rituals that allow Algonquin boys to be declared full-grown men.

But warfare is also part of their lives, and signs point to a defining conflict between Mahingan's nation, its allies the Omàmiwinini (Algonquin), Ouendat (Huron), and the Nippissing against the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois). The battle's aftermath may open the door to future journeys by Mahingan and his followers.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 12-15.

Series Information
This novel is part of the Algonquin Quest Series, a series of young adult novels from Algonquin author Rick Revelle.

Additional Information
280 pages | 5.00" x 8.00"

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Touch
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11;

Ethan is trying his hardest to get some attention from his family, but his dad's focus is always directed towards troubled stepsister Haley. When a dark secret threatens to destroy his family life, Ethan turns to his hacking skills to figure out who to believe: his father or Haley. He must also deal with the fact that he has spent his life striving to be just like his dad, someone he may not really know -- or want to be -- at all.

[Fry reading level - 3.1]

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Love Hurts
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Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11;

Mel's best friend Dustin is her dream guy, but she lost her chance with him last year and now he's seeing someone else. Enter Colter, the handsome new guy in school who is definitely interested in her. It's just the thing Mel needs to get her mind off Dustin. Before Mel realizes it, she's spending almost every waking moment with Colter, even skipping volleyball practices and nights out with friends.

When Colter gives Mel a ring, alarm bells start ringing, and Mel worries that maybe they're moving too fast. But every time Mel tries to cool things down a bit, Colter latches on even tighter. Mel can't bring herself to leave him. But she is beginning to wonder what lengths Colter will go to if she does.

[Fry reading level - 3.7]

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Pure Fake
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11;

Gina is the kind of girl who works hard to keep up her appearance -- not just her hair and makeup, but going so far as breast-enhancement surgery and regular diet pills. When tall, athletic, good-looking Colter wants to be her boyfriend, Gina jumps at the chance. She thinks they'll be the perfect couple and ignores the warning signs that things aren't right with him. That includes rumours that his past girlfriend has a restraining order against him. But when Colter’s actions put Gina in physical danger she is finally forced to wake up to what Colter is really like.

[Fry reading level - 3.0]

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War Games
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Ryan Taber's father is about to deploy for his first tour of duty with the Canadian army in Afghanistan. Ryan lives his days on an army base in Alberta, and spends his evenings at the CyberKnights cafe, playing his favourite video game,Desert Death. At CyberKnights, Ryan meets the Desert Death ultimate champion and becomes entangled in a world of danger and deceit that begins to resemble the very real circumstances his father is facing overseas.

[Fry Reading Level - 5.5]

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Thunder on the Plains
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10;

Reading Level: 4.5

“Get on the phone and call them all to a meeting for next Saturday afternoon,” Danny Wind said to his friend Crow. “We’re going to rescue us some buffalo.” He could hardly believe what he was saying. “But don’t tell anyone else. It’s our little secret for now.”

After two years, middle-school student Danny Wind is still not over his father’s death. When his mom marries a white man and they move to a new “white bread” neighborhood, Danny’s life changes for the worse. The school principal considers him a troublemaker, and he has to avoid Willy, the school bully, who calls him “redskin” and “Tonto.” After he acts out and gets suspended from school, Danny’s mom decides to send him to a summer survival camp for American Indian teens on the reservation where his father grew up.

Discover what happens when Danny gets involved in a secret plan to rescue bison from Yellowstone National Park and discovers something important about himself in the process.

“It was an honor to read and review the reluctant reader book Thunder on the Plains, the first teen novel in the PathFinders books featuring Native American teen characters and situations. It is very refreshing to finally give our Native American children an opportunity to read stories they can relate to. The book contains characters that are appealing, convincing and complex. Recommended for teens that like books with depth, history and Native American culture. This is a well-written book with characters that are culturally appropriate and accurate.”
—Kathleen Marshall (Chumash)
Santa Ynez Chumash Language Teacher
California Dept. of Education, American Indian Education Oversight Committee Member

Gary Robinson is a writer and filmmaker of Cherokee and Choctaw descent. He has spent 25 years working with American Indian communities to tell the stories of Native people. His previous works include From Warriors to Soldiers and The Language of Victory. He lives in rural central California.

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Little Brother of War
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Choctaw;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11;

“Dad, I don’t want to play football or baseball,” I blurted out.
“Oh, what do you want to play?” he asked. “Basketball? I hope its not soccer. That’s not even a real American sport.”
“Stickball,” I said.
“Say what?” Dad replied. He almost spit out a mouth full of coffee.
“Stickball. Toli.”
“You mean running around in your shorts behind the community center on Saturdays? That’s not a real sport.”
“Actually it is a real sport, and I’m talking about playing on a team that will compete at Choctaw Fair next summer.”
Dad slammed his fist down on the table. The plates and glasses shook. I almost jumped out of my seat.

Sixteen-year-old Mississippi Choctaw Randy Cheska lived most of his young life in the shadow of his older football-hero brother, Jack. After Jack is tragically killed while serving in Iraq, Randy's father puts even more pressure on Randy to excel in football. Randy has absolutely no desire or skills to play high school sports but when he discovers that he's good and stickball and loves the game, Randy jumps at the chance to play when its offered. His father considers the sport a relic of the Choctaw past when it was known as the Little Brother of War and used to settle disputes between communities. For Randy, stick ball provides him with a new sense of self-worth and a new direction in life.

Gary Robinson is a writer and filmmaker of Cherokee and Choctaw descent. He has spent 25 years working with American Indian communities to tell the stories of Native people. His previous works include From Warriors to Soldiers and The Language of Victory. He lives in rural central California.

Educator Information
Reading Level: 3.9

This book is part of the PathFinders series of Hi-Lo (high interest, low readability) novels, which offers the following features:

• Indigenous teen protagonists
• Age appropriate plots
• 2.5 – 4.5 Reading Level
• Contemporary and historical fiction
• Indigenous authors

The PathFinders series is from an American publisher. Therefore, Indigenous terminology in the PathFinders books is not the same as Canadian Indigenous terminology. This prompts a useful teaching moment for educators in discussing appropriate terminology use in Canada.

Additional Information
120 pages | 4.53" x 7.00"

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Tribal Journey
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11;

Reading Level: 4.5

There were machines beside my bed. They were beeping and making weird noises. I had a headache and a side ache and an arm ache. But I couldn’t feel my left leg.
Slowly I looked around the room. There was Mom asleep in a chair next to the bed.
“Mom? Mom, what happened?” She woke up and looked at me.
“Oh, Jason. I’m so glad you’re awake. Don’t try to talk. I’ll call the doctor to come check you.”
“What happened to me?”
“Don’t you remember? You were in a terrible car wreck. Two days ago.” As Mom left to find the doctor, the images of the accident flooded back into my mind.

After a bad car accident, Jason is left with one paralyzed leg. He’s lucky to have survived, but he’s not sure he can handle life confined to a wheelchair. Even when he was protecting his mom and siblings from his drunken father, or escaping from home to be with his friends, he never imagined having to deal with anything like this.
Now Jason sees himself only as someone who will always be paralyzed, but when he becomes part of the Raven Canoe Family and learns to “pull” a canoe, his outlook on life begins to change.

Gary Robinson is a writer and filmmaker of Cherokee and Choctaw descent. He has spent 25 years working with American Indian communities to tell the stories of Native people. His previous works include From Warriors to Soldiers and The Language of Victory. He lives in rural central California.

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Danny Blackgoat, Navajo Prisoner
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Danny Blackgoat is a teenager in 1864 Navajo country when United States soldiers burn down his home, kill his sheep, capture his family, and force them all to walk at gunpoint to an Army fort far from their homeland. This forced exodus of the Navajo people was called the Long Walk of 1864, and during the journey, Danny is labeled a troublemaker and given the name Fire Eye. Refusing to accept captivity, he is sent to Fort Davis, Texas, a Civil War prisoner outpost. There he battles bullying fellow prisoners, rattlesnakes, and abusive soldiers, until he meets Jim Davis. Davis teaches Danny how to hold his anger and starts him on the road to literacy. In a stunning climax, Davis—who builds coffins for the dead—aids Danny in a daring and dangerous escape.

Set in troubled times, Danny Blackgoat, Navajo Prisoner is the story of one boy’s hunger to be free and to be Navajo.

Educator Information
Reading Level: 4.0

Series Information
This is the first book in the Danny Blackgoat series, which is part of the PathFinders series. The PathFinders series of Hi-Lo (high interest, low readability) novels offers the following features: 

• Indigenous teen protagonists
• Age appropriate plots
• 2.5 – 4.5 Reading Level
• Contemporary and historical fiction
• Indigenous authors

The PathFinders series is from an American publisher. Therefore, Indigenous terminology in the PathFinders books is not the same as Canadian Indigenous terminology. This prompts a useful teaching moment for educators in discussing appropriate terminology use in Canada.  The recommended ages for books in the PathFinders series are 12-16.

Additional Information
160 pages | 4.50" x 7.00"

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Freedom Bound
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

In Freedom Bound eighteen-year-old Charlotte sails from Canada to Charleston in the beleaguered Thirteen Colonies to join her new husband Nick. During these final months of the American Revolution, she must muster all her wit and courage when she has to rescue Nick from being tortured as a spy in an alligator-infested South Carolina swamp. She must also find ways to bring freedom to a pair of teenage runaway slaves she has befriended. Freedom Bound delivers a frank and realistic picture of the slave system and a powerful account of what was at stake for both white and black Loyalists as they prepared to find a new home in the country that was soon to be Canada. Like The Way Lies North and Broken Trail, the two novels that preceded it, Freedom Bound contains a wealth of carefully researched historical details of one of the least known chapters of our history.

Series Information
This is the third book in the "Forging a Nation" series. Other titles in this series include The Way Lies North, Broken Trail, The White Oneida, and Hope's Journey.

Additional Information
246 pages | 5.25" x 7.63"

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$11.95

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Hannah and the Salish Sea
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8;

In the second volume of the Hannah trilogy, summer has arrived, and fourteen-year-old Hannah Anderson is excited about spending it with Max (who has been giving her stomach butterflies lately). But things are happening in Cowichan Bay that Hannah can't explain. When a mysterious accident leads her to a nest of starving eaglets, she meets Izzy Tate, a young Métis girl staying in the village for the summer. Why is Izzy so angry all the time, and is it just a coincidence that she is the spitting image of Yisella, the Cowichan girl Hannah met the summer she was twelve? Hannah has even more questions. Why is Jack, her raven friend of First Nation legend, bringing her unusual "gifts" in the middle of the night? Is it all connected to a ring of poachers who have apparently moved into the valley? The eaglets are in danger and so are the Roosevelt elk. And what's with the Orca 1, the supposedly abandoned tuna boat anchored out in the bay? After Hannah and Max make a grisly discovery in the woods, they know they must take action. When Izzy agrees to join them on a midnight kayak trip, the three discover the unspeakable poaching secret on the Orca 1, and they are soon in a fight for their lives and the lives of the endangered animals being hunted for their parts.

Reviews
“Carol Anne Shaw provides young teen protagonists with contexts for their own parent and family issues, first attractions, peer pressures, jealousies, trust, and reactivity while learning to be themselves, not what others want them to be. . . . Within the framework of a gloriously natural setting, a First Nations history, and contemporary environmental issues, Hannah and the Salish Sea is sure to draw new readership from those who don’t want to relive too much angst in their books.” —CanLit for Little Canadians

“A delightful evocation of West Coast island life, complete with poachers, grow-ops, First Nations legends and two adventurous and confused fourteen-year-olds.” — John Wilson

Hannah & the Salish Sea pits three spirited teenagers against a gang of unsavory poachers and pot-growers. A quintessential west coast adventure story that’s part page-turner, part budding romance, and part homage to the traditional stories of the Cowichan First Peoples.” —Nikki Tate

Series Information
This is the second book in the Hannah Series, a juvenile fiction novel series.

Additional Information
200 pages | 5.50" x 7.63

Authentic Canadian Content
$11.95

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Hook Up
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Cody Manywounds's intentions are good, but it seems that every time he makes one little mistake, he gets caught. He got into some serious trouble with his friends a while ago, but since then, things have been looking up -- his grades are good, his girlfriend is hot, and the escape to university (and more girls) is just around the corner. Then it all comes crashing down with a single text message: "I'm pregnant. Call me. :)" When Cody's girlfriend decides to get an abortion, he finds himself dealing with conflicting emotions -- and discovers how little a say he is given in the matter.

Interest age: From 13 To 18
Fry Reading Level [grade]: 3.2
Lexile Reading Level: 610L

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The Way Lies North
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9; 11;

This young adult historical novel focuses on Charlotte and her family, Loyalists who are forced to flee their home in the Mohawk Valley as a result of the violence of the “Sons of Liberty” during the American Revolution. At the beginning, fifteen-year-old Charlotte Hooper is separated from her sweetheart, Nick, who sympathizes with the Revolutionaries. The war has already taken the lives of her three brothers, and it is with a sense of desperation that Charlotte and her parents begin the long trek north to the safety of Fort Haldimand (near present-day Kingston).

The novel portrays Charlotte’s struggle on the difficult journey north, and the even more difficult task of making a new home in British Canada. In her relationship with Nick, the novel explores how the ideals of the American Revolution were undermined by a revolutionary ethos of violence. In the flight north, the Mohawk nation plays an important role, and Charlotte learns much about their customs and way of life, to the point where she is renamed “Woman of Two Worlds.” Later in the novel she is able to repay her Native friends when she plays an important part in helping the Oneidas to become once again members of the Iroquois confederacy under British protection.

The story of Charlotte’s journey north is a tale of paradise lost and a new world gained. Strong and capable, Charlotte breaks the stereotype of the eighteenth-century woman, while revealing the positive relationship between the Loyalists and the Native peoples.

Series Information
This is the first book in the "Forging a Nation" series. Other titles in this series include, Broken Trail, Freedom Bound, The White Oneida, and Hope's Journey.

Additional Information
342 pages | 5.25" x 7.62"

Authentic Canadian Content
$10.95

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Broken Trail
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

Broken Trail is the story a thirteen-year-old white boy, the son of United Empire Loyalists, who has been captured and adopted by the Oneida people. Striving to find his vision oki that will guide him in his quest to become a warrior, Broken Trail disavows his white heritage—he considers himself Oneida. But everything changes when Broken Trail, alone in the woods on his vision quest, is mistakenly shot by a redcoat soldier.

Series Information
This is the second book in the "Forging a Nation" series. Other titles in this series include The Way Lies North, Freedom Bound, The White Oneida, and Hope's Journey.

Additional Information
246 pages | 5.50" x 7.62" 

Authentic Canadian Content
$11.95

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Hannah and the Spindle Whorl
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8;

When twelve-year-old Hannah uncovers an ancient Salish spindle whorl hidden in a cave near her home in Cowichan Bay, she is transported back to a village called Tl'ulpalus, in a time before Europeans had settled in the area. Through the agency of a trickster raven, Hannah befriends Yisella, a young Salish girl, and is welcomed into village life. Here she discovers that the spindle whorl is the prize possession of Yisella's mother, Skeepla, a famous spinner and weaver. When Skeepla falls victim to smallpox, Hannah finally begins to open up about the death of her own mother.

Hannah and Yisella are then accidentally left behind when the villagers journey to the mainland, and they witness the arrival of Governor James Douglas and numerous settlers on the Hecate. As the settlers pillage the village for souvenirs, Hannah and Yisella rescue the spindle whorl and, pursued by the ship's crew, escape into the dark forest. From the refuge in the cave, Hannah returns to her own time with a greater understanding of herself and the history of the First Nations.

Series Information
This is the first book in the Hannah Series, a juvenile fiction novel series.

Additional Information
244 pages | 5.50" x 7.63"

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

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