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History

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Black Elk's Vision: A Lakota Story
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6;

Told from the Native American point of view, Black Elk’s Vision provides a unique perspective on American history. From recounting the visions Black Elk had as a young boy, to his involvement in the battles of Little Big Horn and Wounded Knee, as well as his journeys to New York City and Europe with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, this biographical account of Black Elk—an Oglala-Lakota medicine man (1863–1950)—follows him from childhood through adulthood.

S. D. Nelson tells the story of Black Elk through the medicine man’s voice, bringing to life what it was like to be Native American in the mid-to-late nineteenth century and early twentieth century. The Native people found their land overrun by the Wha-shi-choos, or White Man, the buffalo slaughtered for sport and to purposely eliminate their main food source, and their people gathered onto reservations. Through it all, Black Elk clung to his childhood visions that planted the seeds to help his people—and all people—understand their place in the circle of life. The book includes archival images, a timeline, a bibliography, an index, and Nelson’s signature art.

Reviews
“A fine choice for story hours, this will also find wide curricular use.” —Booklist
 
“A modern-day story in the Sioux tradition of storytelling.” —Winston-Salem Journal
 
“Splendid acrylic artwork captures the action, humor, and spirit of the tale. A solid addition to collections of Native American tales and an enjoyable read-aloud.” —School Library Journal
 
“Nelson pulls it off with his confident style as a storyteller . . . polished illustrations . . . informative, well written.” —Kirkus Reviews

Educator Information
F&P level: U
F&P genre: B

Additional Information
48 pages | 10.50" x 10.37"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$26.95

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Buffalo Bird Girl: A Hidatsa Story
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3; 4; 5;

"I was born in an earth lodge by the mouth of the Knife River, in what is now North Dakota, three years after the smallpox winter." - Buffalo Bird Woman

Born in the 1830s, Buffalo Bird Girl was a member of the Hidatsa people, a Native American community that lived in permanent villages along the Missouri River on the Great Plains. Like other girls her age, Buffalo Bird Girl learned the ways of her people through watching, listening and then doing. She helped plant crops in the spring, tended the fields through the summer - scaring off birds and other animals, as well as hungry boys! - and in autumn joined in the harvest. She also learned to prepare animal skins, dry meat and perform other household duties. Along with her chores, however, there was time for playing games with friends or training her dog. Her family also visited the nearby trading post, where all sorts of magnificent things from the white man's settlements in the East could be seen.

Interweaving the actual words and stories of Buffalo Bird Woman with his artwork and archival photographs, award-winning author and artist S.D. Nelson has woven a poignant yet vibrant story, beautifully capturing the spirit of Buffalo Bird Girl and her lost way of life. The book includes a historical timeline.

Reviews
"The extraordinary illustration of this handsome volume begins with the endpaper maps and features acrylic paintings of the Hidatsa world reminiscent of traditional Plains Indian art. Pencil drawings and relevant, carefully labeled photographs round out the exquisite design. All the artwork both supports and adds to the text. An extensive author’s note and timeline supplement this beautiful tribute." —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"Nelson's quiet, respectful tone capably balances the factual details of daily life in the Hidatsa tribe with the obvious joy and nostalgia Buffalo Bird Girl feels toward her childhood." —The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"As a writer, storyteller, and traditional artist of the Sioux people, his perspective is genuine and effectively portrayed. This book would be enjoyable for anyone interested in history, but would also be an effective resource in the classroom to support the curriculum.”—Library Media Connection

"Nelson's acrylic paintings and b&w pencil drawings are intriguingly interlaced with the photographs, contrasting Native American figures in blunt profile with harvest colors and background textures that mimic dried spears of grass, leather skins, and basket weaves." — Publishers Weekly"

Educator Information
This fascinating picture book biography tells the childhood story of Buffalo Bird Woman. Through her true story, readers will learn what it was like to be part of this Native American community that lived along the Missouri River in the Dakotas, a society that depended more on agriculture for food and survival than on hunting. Children will relate to Buffalo Bird Girl’s routine of chores and playing with friends, and they will also be captivated by her lifestyle and the dangers that came with it.

Recommended Ages: 6-10

Additional Information
56 pages | 10.50" x 10.25"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$27.95

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Bull Trout's Gift
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Kootenai; Salish;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

"We were wealthy from the water," Mitch Smallsalmon says, and like all the tribal elders, he speaks to our understanding of the natural world and the consequences of change. In this book the wisdom of the elders is passed on to the young as the story of the Jocko River, the home of the bull trout, unfolds for a group of schoolchildren on a field trip.

The Jocko River flows through the Flathead Indian Reservation in northwestern Montana. For thousands of years the Salish and Pend d’Oreille Indians lived along its banks, finding food and medicine in its plants and fish, and in the game hunted on its floodplain. Readers of this story will learn, along with the students of Ms. Howlett's class, about the history and culture of the river and its meaning in Native life, tradition, and religion. They will also discover the scientific background and social importance behind the Tribes' efforts to restore the bull trout to its home waters.

Beautifully illustrated and narrated in the tradition of the Salish and Kootenai Tribes, this account of conservation as the legacy of one generation to the next is about being good to the land that has been good to us. Bull Trout's Gift is steeped in the culture, history, and science that our children must know if they hope to transform past wisdom into future good.

Educator Information
Ages 8 - 12.

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$32.95

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Counting Coup: Becoming a Crow Chief on the Reservation and Beyond
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9;

Picture a Crow Indian elder, his wizened eyes catching yours in the ancient flicker of firelight. His mesmerizing stories span the ages, from Custer to World War II to the 21st Century. He is the last traditional chief of his people. He is over 90 years old. Now picture that same man lecturing at colleges nationwide, and addressing the United Nations on the subject of peace.

National Geographic presents the amazing life story of Joseph Medicine Crow, the man who begins life as Winter Man. Trained as a warrior by his grandfather, Yellowtail, he bathes in icy rivers and endures the ceremony of "counting coup"—facing fierce combat with an enemy Sioux boy.

An operation at the local hospital brings the young Crow face-to-face with his worst fears: a Sioux, a ghost, and a white man. He excels at the white man's school and is raised in the Baptist faith. He translates the stories of the elder chiefs, becoming the link to the ancient traditions of the pre-reservation generation. His own dramatic and funny stories span both ages, and the ancient Crow legends are passed on in the storytelling tradition.

Joseph Medicine Crow's doctorate degree was interrupted by the call to arms of World War II. On the battlefields of Germany he earned the ancient status of War Chief by completing the four war deeds required of the Crow warrior.

In 1948 the Crow Tribal Council appointed Joseph Medicine Crow (now called High Bird) their Tribal Historian and Anthropologist.

Counting Coup is a vibrant adventure narrative, bringing Native American history and culture alive for young readers. Joseph Medicine Crow's story illuminates the challenges faced by the Crow people as hurricanes of change raged through America. His epic story and its lessons are an essential legacy for us all.

Additional Information
128 pages | 5.55" x 8.55"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$21.95

Quantity:
The Wild Ride: A Chronicle Of the North West Mounted Police 1873-1905
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Reading Level: N/A

If it were fiction, nobody would believe it: mythic aboriginal chiefs, devious politicians, scoundrels, visionary nation builders, fur traders, scouts as tough as the hides they wore, men and women willing to die in their quest for gold… and an unproven force of red-coated cops on an improbable, mission of their own.
The Wild Ride is their story, a brilliantly illustrated history of the Canadian West and the North West Mounted Police – from the throes of Confederation and the Red River Rebellion, to the arrival of the railway in Western Canada and the heroics of the Klondike Gold Rush; all of it played out on a vast, landscape as hostile as any on earth, and every bit as alluring.
The Wild Ride draws on the letters, diaries and memoirs of those who lived this epic period of Canadian history, bringing their story vividly to life with a captivating collection of photos, drawings and maps.

Text Content: Some Indigenous content.

Authentic Canadian Content
$40.50

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