English Language Arts

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A Book Of Tricksters
Author: Jon C. Stott
Format: Paperback
  • For centuries, people around the world have been telling stories about tricksters-characters who solve problems by using their wits to fool others. Sometimes, these tricksters want to help people. Other times, they use their cleverness for selfish reasons. Occasionally, they aren't as clever as they think and are themselves tricked. Although trickster tales from different countries are similar in many ways, story details, problems to be solved and the personalities of characters reflect the beliefs and values of the culture from which they come. Not only are trickster stories entertaining, they also teach readers things about themselves. And they show how, through wit and inventiveness, unlikely or under appreciated characters often can succeed. In A Book of Tricksters, Jon C. Stott has collected traditional trickster tales from 14 different countries, including "How Anansi Brought Stories to the People" (Ghana), "How Zhao Paid His Taxes" (China), "How Kancil Built a Crocodile Bridge" (Indonesia) and "How Maui Discovered the Secret of Fire" (Hawaii)

$12.95

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A Story as Sharp as a Knife
Format: Paperback
  • A seminal collection of Haida myths and legends; now in a gorgeous new package.

    The linguist and ethnographer John Swanton took dictation from the last great Haida-speaking storytellers, poets and historians from the fall of 1900 through the summer of 1901. Together they created a great treasury of Haida oral literature in written form.

    Having worked for many years with these century-old manuscripts, linguist and poet Robert Bringhurst brings both rigorous scholarship and a literary voice to the English translation of John Swanton's careful work. He sets the stories in a rich context that reaches out to dozens of native oral literatures and to myth-telling traditions around the globe.

    Attractively redesigned, this collection of First Nations oral literature is an important cultural record for future generations of Haida, scholars and other interested readers. It won the Edward Sapir Prize, awarded by the Society for Linguistic Anthropology, and it was chosen as the Literary Editor's Book of the Year by the Times of London.

    Bringhurst brings these works to life in the English language and sets them in a context just as rich as the stories themselves one that reaches out to dozens of Native American oral literatures, and to mythtelling traditions around the world.

$24.95

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Activating the Heart: Storytelling, Knowledge Sharing, and Relationships
Format: Paperback
  • Activating the Heart is an exploration of storytelling as a tool for knowledge production and sharing to build new connections between people and their histories, environments, and cultural geographies. The collection pays particular attention to the significance of storytelling in Indigenous knowledge frameworks and extends into other ways of knowing in works where scholars have embraced narrative and story as a part of their research approach.

    In the first section, Storytelling to Understand, authors draw on both theoretical and empirical work to examine storytelling as a way of knowing. In the second section, Storytelling to Share, authors demonstrate the power of stories to share knowledge and convey significant lessons, as well as to engage different audiences in knowledge exchange. The third section, Storytelling to Create, contains three poems and a short story that engage with storytelling as a means to produce or create knowledge, particularly through explorations of relationship to place.

    The result is an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural dialogue that yields important insights in terms of qualitative research methods, language and literacy, policy-making, human–environment relationships, and healing. This book is intended for scholars, artists, activists, policymakers, and practitioners who are interested in storytelling as a method for teaching, cross-cultural understanding, community engagement, and knowledge exchange.

    Educator Information
    This book would be useful for the following subjects: Indigenous Studies, Literary Criticism, Creative Writing, and Social Science.

    Additional Information
    220 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

    Edited by Julia Christensen, Christopher Cox and Lisa Szabo-Jones.

Authentic Canadian Content
$24.99

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An Arctic Man: The classic account of sixty-five years in Canada's North
Author: Ernie Lyall
Format: Paperback
  • Ernie Lyall was born in Labrador in 1910 and joined the Hudson's Bay Company at a time when it was expanding its presence in the Eastern Arctic. He spent many years as a front-line player with the company, building stores and developing trade with the local people. He became part of the Inuit community by marrying an Inuk and together with his wife Nipisha he raised a large family, some members of which play significant roles in today's Nunavut. Ernie's fluency in both Inuktitut and English made him a key interpreter and witness to many historic events in the Baffin region for over half a century, giving him insight into both sides of the cultural divide in the North and earning him respect from many quarters. In 1949 he and his family settled in Taloyoak (then known as Spence Bay) where he eventually left the HBC to become a wildlife officer with the Government of the Northwest Territories.

    Ernie's story illustrates the realities of life for Inuit in the Canadian North during the last years in their camps on the land, a world that has now in large part been lost to history. His autobiography is unique in the perspective it offers and his original 1979 text is presented here with a foreword which provides new insights into Ernie's comments linking the old Inuit world with the new one in the modern Nunavut. Ernie's children reflect the cross-cultural bridging taught them by their parents and today contribute to the economic and community development of the North through a variety of roles, including leadership in the co-operative movement, land claim boards, business and government.

    An Arctic Man not only tells about Inuit life as it was actually lived on the land but also illustrates how change, southern influences and the move into permanent communities impacted their society. This book offers a window onto the remarkable transition that occurred in the Canadian Eastern Arctic for much of the twentieth century with a frankness, insight and humour that was very much a part of Ernie Lyall's straightforward everyday style.

$19.95

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At Risk
Format: Paperback
  • Tia is spending the summer working at a special ranch designed to "scare straight" at-risk youth. She tries to bond with Sage, a street kid who has been given one last chance to get her life together. But Sage resists Tia's overtures, and when money goes missing, all fingers point to the troubled teen. At Risk combines a satisfying mystery plot with a sympathetic portrayal of teens grappling with dark pasts and uncertain futures.


    Interest age: From 13 To 17
    Fry Reading Level [grade]: 4.6
    Lexile Reading Level: 760L

$9.95

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Bear Bones & Feathers
Format: Paperback
  • In this powerful book of poetry, First Nations Cree writer Louise Bernice Halfe sets out to heal the past.

    Employing Native spiritualism, black comedy and the memories of her own childhood as healing arts, she finds an irrepressible source of strength and dignity in her people. Bear Bones and Feathers is rooted in Louise Bernice Halfe's own life. She offers moving portraits of her grandmother (a medicine woman whose life straddled old and new worlds), her parents (both trapped in a cycle of jealousy and abuse), and the people whose pain she witnessed on the reserve and at residential school.

$12.95

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Blue Marrow
Format: Paperback
  • This moving tribute to Native female strength, nominated for the Governor General's Award for Poetry is available again in a rewritten, re-edited and redesigned edition. The beautifully designed cover depicts the author's 4 grandmothers dancing among the Northern lights.

$16.95

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Breaking Boundaries: LGBTQ2 Writers on Coming Out and Into Canada
Format: Paperback
  • An anthology of stories and poetry written by Canadian LGBTQ2 authors who are immigrants, refugees, or Canada-born.

    “What does it mean to be LGBTQ2 in Canada? The only possible answer to that question is one given in many voices. That is exactly what this book offers. There is struggle in these stories and poems, but there is also strength and resilience, compassion and determination. Woven together these voices leave me with a sense of hopefulness: a belief that the creativity and fierce commitment of our community will carry us forward as we work to create a Canada that lives up to the dream of freedom and safety it represents to so many people around the world.” — Robin Stevenson, author of Pride: Celebrating Diversity and Community

    Review
    The anthology pieces are diverse with authors who identify as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and 2-Spirited. It also includes stunning artwork by LGBTQ artists and allies. — Rainbow Refugee Society

    Authors & Artists
    Authors in this anthology include Teryl Berg, Kyle Chen, Wendy Judith Cutler, Corrie Hope Furst, Kevin Henry, Anne Hofland, Chantal Hughes, Masaki Kidokoro, Dale Lee Kwong, Austin Lee, JL Lori, Eka Nasution (narrator), Adam Nixon, Rainer Oktovianus (narrator), Gail Marlene Schwartz, Caelan Sinclair, LS Stone, Sosania Tomlinson, E.T. Turner, and Hayley Zacks.

    Artwork by Joni Danielson, Wokie Clark Fraser, Austin Lee, Trinity Lindenau, and Rainer Oktovianus.

    Additional Information
    146 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"
    Edited by Lori Shwydky

    This book contains memoirs, stories, poems, and artwork, which is why it appears in a variety of categories, such as both Fiction and Non-fiction, on our website.

Authentic Canadian Content
$13.95

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Dead White Writer on the Floor
Format: Paperback
  • A funny yet thought-provoking play about identity politics. Cast of 4 men and 1 woman.

$17.95

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Deaf Heaven
Traditional Territory: Secwepemc
Format: Paperback
  • Poetry that takes us inside present-day First Nations reality to reveal the wounds of history and the possible healing to come.

    As the title suggests, this new collection of poetry from Garry Gottfriedson of the Secwepemc (Shuswap) Nation deals with the ways in which the world is deaf to the problems First Nations people face in Canada today.

    Follow Garry Gottfriedson in this new collection of combative poems as he compels us and Heaven to listen to the challenges facing First Nation communities today. Employing many of the Secwepemc (Shuswap) images and stories, Gottfriedson takes us inside the rez and into the rooming houses in the city cores, but always drawing new strength from the land and the people who have moved upon it. He speaks of “the smell of grandmothers and grandfathers / breathing the stories into our blood” so as to “wrap our newborn in freshly made Star Quilts.”

    Gottfriedson examines such issues as the Truth and Reconciliation movements as well as the missing and murdered Aboriginal women. The poems focus not only on postcolonial issues but also on First Nations internal problems. Although the book speaks of age-old themes, it explores them through fresh modern eyes offering thought-provoking and engaging prespectives. Eloquent and witty, these poems are power-packed with imagery that uncovers the raw politics of race. There is nothing polite about them. While frequently offering a bleak view of present-day First Nation conditions, the poems also provide a sense of optimism: "the hope/that the coldest day in winter/will promise serenity in spring."

    Reviews
    “Gottfriedson’s poetry is built to endure and it will remain with you long after this book is closed.” – Alexander MacLeod, author of Light Lifting, finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize

    “Garry Gottfriedson rides double, calling out the violence and corruption he’s seen, while reminding us that grounded strength comes from staying connected to grandmothers, grandfathers, horses, and the land.” – Rita Wong, author of Forage, winner of the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize

    “Gottfriedson writes us the sound of his blood, the splatter of ink on wood, and the dripping sweat and tears of prayer — all of it telling us who we are and chanting, as if in chorus, ‘survival is brilliant.’ Will we be wise or strong enough to listen?” – Shane Rhodes, author of X: Poems & Anti-Poems

    Educator Information
    This book of poetry would be useful for Indigenous Studies courses or literature courses such as Indigenous Literatures, Canadian Literature, and Creative Writing.

    Additional Information
    100 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$15.95

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Dream Racer
Format: Paperback
  • Zoë's caught the racing bug. Not only is she following in the tire tracks of her older brother as a rally racer, she thinks she might even have the stuff to become a racecar engineer one day. But Zoë's mother has another dream for her daughter, and it's called "Zoë Kendall, M.D." In this fast-action sequel to Racing Fear, Zoë must learn to stand up to her mother's good intentions before her true aspirations come to a screeching halt.


    Interest age: From 13 To 17
    Fry Reading Level [grade]: 4.6
    Lexile Reading Level: 800L

$9.95

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First Nations Hockey Players
Author: Will Cardinal
Format: Paperback
  • People of the Mi'kmaq Nation in Nova Scotia were playing a type of ice hockey in the late 1600s. Over the centuries, the role of the First Nations in that sport has been marked by innate ability, enthusiasm and many challenges.

    Sandy Lake Cree member Fred Sasakamoose of the Chicago Blackhawks was the first Native to play in the National Hockey League. His achievements were the beginning of a proud history of First Nations hockey players who became NHL heroes on and off the ice.

    FIRST NATIONS HOCKEY PLAYERS tells the stories of these great players, Inuit, Ojibwa, Mohawk, Metis, Mi'kmaq, Cree and many other NHL stars with First Nations roots, are highlighted along with current players such as Jonathan Cheechoo, Carey Price, Sheldon Souray and Jordin Tootoo. The book also features tales of hockey greats such as Bryan Trottier, Reggie Leach, Stan Jonathan, Theoren Fleury and Grant Fuhr.

$14.95

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Fur Trade Letters of Willie Traill 1864-1893
Format: Paperback
  • Son of Catharine Parr Traill and nephew of Susanna Moodie, William Edward Traill, better known as Willie, came by his literary talent naturally. He found employment with the Hudson’s Bay Company in what was to become the Canadian West. His letters home are a rich and detailed portrait of domestic life in the fur trade of the Northwest between 1864 and 1893. At turns gritty then deeply touching but always fascinating and informative, the Willie Traill letters throw open a window on the joys and heartbreaking challenges of family life in the service of the fur trade.

$34.95

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George Littlechild: The Spirit Giggles Within
Format: Hardcover
  • George Littlechild: The Spirit Giggles Within is a stunning retrospective of a career that has spanned nearly four decades. Featuring more than 150 of the Plains Cree artist's mixed-media works, this sumptuous collection showcases the bold swaths of colour and subtle textures of Littlechild's work. Littlechild has never shied away from political or social themes. His paintings blaze with strong emotions ranging from anger to compassion, humour to spiritualism. Fully embracing his Plains Cree heritage, he combines traditional Cree elements like horses and transformative or iconic creatures with his own family and personal symbols in a unique approach. George Littlechild: The Spirit Giggles Within shows the evolution of an artist from his earliest works to the present day, including hints of future directions and themes. An insightful foreword by artist and curator Ryan Rice, a Mohawk from the Kahnawake First Nation in Quebec, and Littlechild's reflections on each piece build a broad understanding of Littlechild's work, his life and his views on the role of art within all cultures.

$59.95

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He Moved A Mountain
Author: Joan Harper
Format: Paperback
  • Dr. Frank Arthur Calder of BC's Nisga'a First Nation was the first aboriginal person to be elected to any Canadian governing body. For twenty-six years he served as an MLA in the legislature of British Columbia. He was the driving force behind Canada's decision to grant recognition of aboriginal land title to First Nations people throughout the country. He accomplished this goal by guiding the controversial request through a series of court cases, finally to the Supreme Court of Canada, achieving success when Parliament, in an all-party resolution, passed a measure recognizing indigenous title. Because of this historic decision, Canada serves as a resource for other aboriginal populations in countries where similar accommodations for aboriginal people have not yet been made. Calder received many honours in his lifetime, including the Order of Canada. The one he most cherished, however, was one rarely bestowed by the Nisga'a Nation: "Chief of Chiefs." While growing up, Frank went to grade 10 in residential school, completed high school and then graduated from the University of BC (in the Anglican Theological College). It took him two years longer than usual to complete university, as he had to return home during the fishing season to earn the money for his tuition.

$21.95

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