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Historical Fiction

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Ho'onani: Hula Warrior
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Hawaiian;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

An empowering celebration of identity, acceptance and Hawaiian culture based on the true story of a young girl in Hawaiʻi who dreams of leading the boys-only hula troupe at her school.

Ho'onani feels in-between. She doesn't see herself as wahine (girl) OR kane (boy). She's happy to be in the middle. But not everyone sees it that way.

When Ho'onani finds out that there will be a school performance of a traditional kane hula chant, she wants to be part of it. But can a girl really lead the all-male troupe? Ho'onani has to try . . .

Based on a true story, Ho'onani: Hula Warrior is a celebration of Hawaiian culture and an empowering story of a girl who learns to lead and learns to accept who she really is--and in doing so, gains the respect of all those around her.

Ho'onani's story first appeared in the documentary A Place in the Middle by filmmakers Dean Hamer and Joe Wilson.

Reviews
“Boldly outlined watercolor and ink artwork . . . convey visual information with strength that suggests Ho‘onani’s own. And Gale grounds the child’s experience, based on a true story, in Hawaiian traditions, modeling showing ‘every person the same unconditional acceptance and respect’.” --Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Ho'onani’s courage to be true to herself and her place in the middle is empowering. Hawaiian words are intermixed, and Song’s illustrations are full of emotion and determination.” --Kirkus Reviews

Ho’onani: Hula Warrior tells the story of a young gender-nonconforming child who, though she still uses female pronouns, does not wish to be either a girl or a boy. Ho’onani is seen by some as too loud, too brash, too masculine. But when she starts to show an interest in leading a group of students in a hula chant, some don’t believe she can do it because she’s not a boy, not strong enough, not bold enough! Stuck in the middle but not willing to back down, Ho’onani and her teacher, Kumu Hina (“kumu” means teacher), work to build her skills and prepare her to take the tests necessary to show that she is skilled enough to lead. And while her parents and brother are not very surprised at Ho’onani’s determination, Kana, her sister, is less than pleased and stops hanging out with Ho’onani like they used to. But in the end, Ho’onani works hard and continues to buck stereotypes in the process, ultimately bringing her closer to her goal with each passing day, until the moment arrives when she must prove herself in front of the whole community.

This empowering and delightfully engaging picture book is based on the true story of Ho’onani Kamai who was raised in Honolulu and was coached by Hinaleimoana Kwai Kong Wong-Kalu (shortened in the book to Kumu Hina). An author’s note at the beginning gives a more detailed explanation of the real-life story, some history and a mention of the documentary (A Place in the Middle) which was inspired by Ho’onani and Kumu Hina’s working together.

.... The story is not simply one of strength and overcoming obstacles, but it is also a story about traditions, acceptance, and respect for others. Ho’onani is not simply a determined youngster, but also an individual trying to help others understand that gender stereotypes are harmful and limiting. Gale’s picture book will help young readers and adults better understand a small slice of Hawaiian traditions and nonbinary people, referred to as Mahu, those who embody both feminine and masculine traits.

.... An entertaining, illuminating, and empowering read, Ho’onani: Hula Warrior will make a welcome addition to classrooms, libraries, and story times!” --CM Magazine

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 4-8.

The author thanks Ho'onani Kamia and Kumu Hina on her website for allowing her to write this story.

Additional Information
40 pages | 8.80" x 11.40"

Authentic Canadian Content
$21.99

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Nunavummi Reading Series: What Was It Like Then?
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4;

Miali loves spending time with her anaanatsiaq!

Anaanatsiaq has lots of stories to share about her past. Miali loves listening to Anaanatsiaq’s stories and learning about what life was like long ago.

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the Nunavummi Reading Series, a Nunavut-developed series that supports literacy learning while teaching readers about the people, traditions, and environment of the Canadian Arctic. It is a Level 12 book in the series.

Nunavummi Reading Series books have also been officially levelled using the Fountas & Pinnell Text Level Gradient™ Levelling System. F&P Level of this book: O.

Curriculum Connections: Language and Literacy; Diversity; Indigenous Perspectives; History and Heritage.

Recommended for ages 7 to 9.

Additional Information
24 pages | 7.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$10.95

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Nunavummi Reading Series: Grandma, How Do You Light the Qulliq?
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3;

Learn all about the history and traditional uses of the qulliq.

In this book, a grandmother teaches her grandchild how to light a qulliq and tells her about its history and traditional uses.

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the Nunavummi Reading Series, a Nunavut-developed series that supports literacy learning while teaching readers about the people, traditions, and environment of the Canadian Arctic. It is a Level 9 book in the series.

Nunavummi Reading Series books have also been officially levelled using the Fountas & Pinnell Text Level Gradient™ Levelling System. F&P Level of this book: L.

Curriculum Connections: Language and Literacy; Diversity; Indigenous Perspectives; History and Heritage.

Recommended for ages 6 to 8.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.00" x 6.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$8.95

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Métis Camp Circle: A Bison Culture Way of Life
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

During much of the nineteenth century, bison hunting was integral to the Métis’ social, economic, and political life. As “people of the buffalo,” the Métis were bison hunters par excellence. In Métis Camp Circle: A Bison Way of Life, author and artist Leah Marie Dorion transports young readers back in time when bison were the basis of Métis lifeways on the Plains. Vibrantly illustrated and infused with important cultural teachings, this charming book skillfully informs us about this important period of Métis history.

Educator Information
Grade Level: Primary (recommended by Gabriel Dumont Institute).

Dual-language: English and Michif.  Includes a CD with English and Michif narration.

Includes back matter on Bison as a Food Source; Organizing the Bison Hunt; Bison Artefacts; Pemmican; Patrice Fleury Remembrance (on the bison hunt); and more information about the author/illustrator and translator.

Additional Information
43 pages 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$15.00

Quantity:
Encounter (Luby)
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2;

Two people navigate their differences with curiosity and openness in this stunning picture book that imagines the first meeting between an Indigenous fisher and a European sailor.

Based on an actual journal entry by French explorer Jacques Cartier from his first expedition to North America in July 1534, this story imagines the first encounter between a European sailor and a Stadaconan fisher. As the two navigate their differences (language, dress, food) with curiosity, the natural world around them notes their similarities. The seagull observes their like shadows, the mosquito notes their equally appealing blood, the mouse enjoys the crumbs both people leave behind.

This story explores how encounters can create community and celebrates varying perspectives and the natural world. It is at once specific and universal. It's a story based on a primary document and historical research, but it is in equal measure beautifully imagined. It makes room for us to recognize our differences while celebrating our shared humanity.

Debut author Brittany Luby's background in social justice and history brings a breathtaking depth of insight and understanding to this story and Michaela Goade's expressive art brings equal life to the creatures and landscapes. An author's note outlines the historical context as well as situates the story in the present day.

Reviews
"Shared humanity is at the center of this Indigenous author and illustrator team’s alternative history.... Encounter’s most valuable aspect is its backmatter: Both an author’s reflection and a historical note offer crucial context to this spirited revision. “This peaceful encounter does not forgive…violent actions,” Luby notes. “Instead, it reminds us…that everyday people, like Sailor, can participate in systems that hurt others.” Without this addendum, this story runs the risk of obscuring legacies of violence rather than “learn[ing] from our history and tak[ing] the opportunity to map a better future.”

"An uplifting, #ownvoices vision for what could have been and what we are responsible for now." - Kirkus Reviews

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 3 to 7

Includes an author's reflection and historical note that provide crucial context to the events in the story.

Additional Information
40 pages | 8.50" x 10.63"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$21.99

Quantity:
Two Roads (PB)
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

A boy discovers his Native American heritage in this Depression-era tale of identity and friendship by the author of Code Talker.

It's 1932, and twelve-year-old Cal Black and his Pop have been riding the rails for years after losing their farm in the Great Depression. Cal likes being a "knight of the road" with Pop, even if they're broke. But then Pop has to go to Washington, DC--some of his fellow veterans are marching for their government checks, and Pop wants to make sure he gets his due--and Cal can't go with him. So Pop tells Cal something he never knew before: Pop is actually a Creek Indian, which means Cal is too. And Pop has decided to send Cal to a government boarding school for Native Americans in Oklahoma called the Challagi School.

At school, the other Creek boys quickly take Cal under their wings. Even in the harsh, miserable conditions of the Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding school, he begins to learn about his people's history and heritage. He learns their language and customs. And most of all, he learns how to find strength in a group of friends who have nothing beyond each other.

Reviews
"Cal's cleareyed first-person narration drives the novel. Meticulously honest, generous, autonomous and true, he sees things for what they are rather than what he'd like them to be. The result is one of Bruchac's best books." —New York Times Book Review

"A tautly paced and compelling story of self-discovery, family, belonging, and friendship." —Horn Book, starred review

"Multiple compelling Depression-era histories converge in Bruchac's latest . . . The students' utter subversion of Challagi's mission to sever their ties with Indian culture soon becomes apparent, as does Cal's powerful, growing understanding of his identity." —Booklist

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 10+

Additional Information
320 pages | 5.81" x 8.56"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$10.99

Quantity:
At the Mountain's Base
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Cherokee;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

A family, separated by duty and distance, waits for a loved one to return home in this lyrical picture book celebrating the bonds of a Cherokee family and the bravery of history-making women pilots.

At the mountain's base sits a cabin under an old hickory tree. And in that cabin lives a family -- loving, weaving, cooking, and singing. The strength in their song sustains them through trials on the ground and in the sky, as they wait for their loved one, a pilot, to return from war.

With an author's note that pays homage to the true history of Native American U.S. service members like WWII pilot Ola Mildred "Millie" Rexroat, this is a story that reveals the roots that ground us, the dreams that help us soar, and the people and traditions that hold us up.

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.38" x 11.81"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$23.99

Quantity:
Indian No More
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Umpqua;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

Regina Petit's family has always been Umpqua, and living on the Grand Ronde Tribe's reservation is all ten-year-old Regina has ever known. Her biggest worry is that Sasquatch may actually exist out in the forest. But when the federal government enacts a law that says Regina's tribe no longer exists, Regina becomes "Indian no more" overnight--even though she lives with her tribe and practices tribal customs, and even though her ancestors were Indian for countless generations.

Now that they've been forced from their homeland, Regina's father signs the family up for the federal Indian Relocation Program and moves them to Los Angeles. Regina finds a whole new world in her neighborhood on 58th Place. She's never met kids of other races, and they've never met a real Indian. For the first time in her life, Regina comes face to face with the viciousness of racism, personally and toward her new friends.

Meanwhile, her father believes that if he works hard, their family will be treated just like white Americans. But it's not that easy. It's 1957 during the Civil Rights era, and the family struggles without their tribal community and land. At least Regina has her grandmother, Chich, and her stories. At least they are all together.

In this moving middle-grade novel drawing upon Umpqua author Charlene Willing McManis's own tribal history, Regina must find out: Who is Regina Petit? Is she Indian, American, or both? And will she and her family ever be okay?

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 8 to 12 (Interest Level: Grades 3 - 8; Reading Level: Grades 4 - 8).

Guided Reading: W

Themes: Bullying, Courage, Discrimination, Families, History, Home, Identity/Self-Esteem/Confidence, Middle Grade, Native American Interest, US History

Additional Information
10 pages | 9.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$25.95

Coming Soon
Blueberry Patch / Mayabeekamneeboon
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3;

Based in Duck Bay, Manitoba, in the 1940s, an Elder shares his experience of packing up to go out to collect blueberries, a traditional gathering that took place every summer. He describes the journey and landscape with humor and such vivid imagery that readers will see themselves there with him, boarding the trail of wagons from surrounding communities and heading east toward the blueberry patch. The Elder's stories offer a journey back in time and are complemented by images of fields of plump blueberries, tall green grass, bannock baking over an open fire, clear freshwater streams and the tents the people slept in.

Educator Information
Written in English and Anishinaabemowin. Includes a page of after-reading activities for kids at the back of the book that both test reading comprehension and encourage further inquiry and exploration.

Recommended for ages 6-8.

Themes: Manitoba, Berries, Food Sovereignty, Indigenous, Traditions, Food, Culture.

Includes a recipe for bannock.

Translated by Norman Chartrand.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.00" x 8.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$19.95

Quantity:
Nunavummi Reading Series: Celebrating Toonik Tyme
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2;

Toonik Tyme is a lot of fun!

This book describes different things that happen during Toonik Tyme, an annual festival in Iqaluit that celebrates Inuit traditions and the return of spring.

Educator & Series Information 
This book is part of the Nunavummi Reading Series, a Nunavut-developed series that supports literacy learning while teaching readers about the people, traditions, and environment of the Canadian Arctic.  It is a Level 7 book in the series. 

Nunavummi Reading Series books have also been officially levelled using the Fountas & Pinnell Text Level Gradient™ Levelling System. This book's F&P Level is E.

Curriculum Connections: Language and literacy; Indigenous perspectives; Community engagement; History; Heritage

Recommended for ages 5-7.

Additional Information 
16 pages | 10.00" x 10.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$7.95

Quantity:
A Grain of Rice
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 6; 7; 8; 9;

Thirteen-year-old Yen and her family have survived a war, famine and persecution. When a flood ruins their village in rural Vietnam, they take the ultimate risk on a chance for a better life.

Reviews
"Tran-Davies does not shy away from the terrible realities of post-war Vietnam, including the poverty, corruption, and violence that affected its citizens. The events in this novel are based on history and will act as curriculum tie-in for middle school students. Yen is a well-written character, a strong young teen, struggling to understand the world around her. Ma speaks little, but much is learned by her actions. Much is included in this book including many secondary characters and the many political and social issues of the time.Highly Recommended."— CM Magazine

"A suspenseful action story. . . which gives insight into the events that still haunt Canada's Vietnamese population — and the struggles of refugees past and present".— Quill & Quire

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 11-14 (young adult fiction).

Additional Information
168 pages | 5.40" x 8.25"

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
The Journal of Etienne Mercier
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Haida;
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

In 1853, Étienne Mercier, a French-Canadian voyageur painter, is tasked by his employer to return to the Queen Charlotte Islands and document his travels into Haida territory. A wide-eyed and good-natured Mercier takes the opportunity to try to track down his long-lost friend, Clément, in the wilderness of what would later become the Canadian Pacific coast.

Written in Mercier’s own broken English, or Franglais, and punctuated with traditional Canadien folk songs, David Bouchard’s candid glance into the everyday tribulations of a typical voyageur vividly depicts—along with Gordon Miller’s evocative illustrations—life on the colonial frontier in the mid-nineteenth century.

Reviews
"David Bouchard scores with this quirky concoction of history, art, nature, and folk songs. The Journal of Etienne Mercier, like Bouchard’s previous If You’re Not from the Prairies and The Colours of British Columbia, is a book for most ages. Pushing successfully at the parameters traditionally associated with picture books, Bouchard’s new work is the fictionalized diary of a trapper who took an 1853 trip to document, in words and drawings, the world of the Haida in the Queen Charlotte Islands. Between its gold-accented covers, The Journal has the look of an old diary. Its sepia-toned pages show signs of aging at the outer edges. Its double-spaced text, in italic font, recalls script of the period. Gordon Miller, acclaimed for his paintings and illustrations of native life, creates an air of authenticity with 14 detailed pen-and-ink sketches, 13 wonderfully dramatic full-page colour paintings, and two maps..." - Quill & Quire

Educator Information
A picture book for all ages.

Additional Information
40 pages | 8.00" x 10.00" | Hardcover 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

Quantity:
Spirit Bear: Fishing for Knowledge, Catching Dreams: Based on a True Story
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

Spirit Bear is off on another adventure! Follow him as he learns about traditional knowledge and Residential Schools from his Uncle Huckleberry and his friend, Lak'insxw, before heading to Algonquin territory, where children teach him about Shannen's Dream.

Spirit Bear and his new friends won't stop until Shannen's Dream of "safe and comfy schools" comes true for every First Nations student.

Dear Uncle Huckleberry,

Look up at the stars tonight. If you look closely, you'll see Shannen Koostachin lighting the way.

Shannen knew that school should be a time for dreams and that every child deserves to have a safe and comfy school, a proper education, and to feel proud of who they are. Every child is sacred.

Did you know that many First Nations schools get less money from the government than other schools? Shannen knew this was wrong. And so do I.

And like my mom, Mary the Bear, always says, when we see something wrong, we need to help make things right!

Did you know that Lak'insxw means "grizzly bear" in Gitxsan language?

Additional Information
52 pages | 216 x 216 mm

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$15.00

Quantity:
Two Roads
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

A boy discovers his Native American heritage in this Depression-era tale of identity and friendship by the author of Code Talker.

It's 1932, and twelve-year-old Cal Black and his Pop have been riding the rails for years after losing their farm in the Great Depression. Cal likes being a "knight of the road" with Pop, even if they're broke. But then Pop has to go to Washington, DC--some of his fellow veterans are marching for their government checks, and Pop wants to make sure he gets his due--and Cal can't go with him. So Pop tells Cal something he never knew before: Pop is actually a Creek Indian, which means Cal is too. And Pop has decided to send Cal to a government boarding school for Native Americans in Oklahoma called the Challagi School.

At school, the other Creek boys quickly take Cal under their wings. Even in the harsh, miserable conditions of the Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding school, he begins to learn about his people's history and heritage. He learns their language and customs. And most of all, he learns how to find strength in a group of friends who have nothing beyond each other.

Reviews
"Cal's cleareyed first-person narration drives the novel. Meticulously honest, generous, autonomous and true, he sees things for what they are rather than what he'd like them to be. The result is one of Bruchac's best books." —New York Times Book Review

"A tautly paced and compelling story of self-discovery, family, belonging, and friendship." —Horn Book, starred review

"Multiple compelling Depression-era histories converge in Bruchac's latest . . . The students' utter subversion of Challagi's mission to sever their ties with Indian culture soon becomes apparent, as does Cal's powerful, growing understanding of his identity." —Booklist

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 10+

Additional Information
320 pages | 5.81" x 8.56"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$22.99

Quantity:
The Birchbark House Series (book 5): Makoons
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Anishinaabeg; Ojibwe;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

In this award-winning sequel to Chickadee, acclaimed author Louise Erdrich continues her celebrated Birchbark House series with the story of an Ojibwe family in nineteenth-century America.

Named for the Ojibwe word for little bear, Makoons and his twin, Chickadee, have traveled with their family to the Great Plains of Dakota Territory.

There they must learn to become buffalo hunters and once again help their people make a home in a new land. But Makoons has had a vision that foretells great challenges—challenges that his family may not be able to overcome.

Based on Louise Erdrich’s own family history, this fifth book in the series features black-and-white interior illustrations, a note from the author about her research, and a map and glossary of Ojibwe terms.

Reviews
“Erdrich continues her excellent storytelling. She has a knack for creating humorous and endearing characters. This beautiful novel is quick moving and deeply affecting. Readers will thoroughly enjoy following Makoons and learning about Ojibwe life.”— School Library Journal (starred review)

“Warm intergenerational moments abound. Erdrich provides fascinating information about Ojibwe daily life. Readers will be enriched by Erdrich’s finely crafted corrective to the Eurocentric dominant narrative of America’s past.”— Horn Book (starred review)

“Erdrich’s simple text and delicate pencil illustrations provide a detailed, honest portrait of Plains life. A warm and welcome addition to the unfolding saga of a 19th-century Ojibwe family.”— Kirkus Reviews

Series Information
This is the fifth book in the Birchbark House Series, a series of Indigenous juvenile fiction novels written by Ojibwe writer Louise Erdrich.

Additional Information
192 pages | 5.12" x 7.62"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$8.50

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Hope's Journey
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

It's 1791. The year a new province is created in the country that will one day be called Canada. The year Hope Cobman's life turns around. At thirteen, she must leave the orphanage where she has lived since her mother's death one year ago. Alone in the world, she dreams of finding her father and three brothers - all complete strangers to her, for even before her birth the American Revolution had scattered her family. Forced into becoming an indentured servant, she is little more than a slave to a lonely man and his bitter, crippled mother. Finally set free, she sets off on her own. But instead of finding a father and a brother who will take care of her, she learns that it is up to her to help them recover from the wounds of war. Along the way, she discovers her own strength. For Hope, and for all the Loyalists of Upper Canada, a brighter future lies ahead.

Series Information
This is the fifth book in the "Forging a Nation" series. Other titles in this series include The Way Lies North, Broken Trail, Freedom Bound, and The White Oneida.

Additional Information
220 pages | 7.63" x 5.25"

Please Note: While Indigenous peoples are mentioned and/or included in this story, this book's content does not focus prominently on Indigenous peoples.

Authentic Canadian Content
$11.95

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When a Ghost Talks, Listen: A Choctaw Trail of Tears Story
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Choctaw;
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7;

Ten-year-old Isaac, now a ghost, continues with his people as they walk the Choctaw Trail of Tears headed to Indian Territory in what will one day become Oklahoma. There have been surprises aplenty on their trek, but now Isaac and his three Choctaw comrades learn they can time travel. The foursome heads back in time to Washington, D.C., to bear witness for Choctaw Chief Pushmataha who has come to the nation's capital at the invitation of Andrew Jackson.

Series Information
This is the second book in the How I Became a Ghost series by Tim Tingle.

Additional Information
200 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$25.95

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The People Shall Continue
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Indigenous American;
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3; 4; 5;

Many, many years ago, all things came to be.
The stars, rocks, plants, rivers, animals.
Mountains, sun, moon, birds, all things.
And the People were born.


Told in the rhythms of traditional oral narrative, this powerful telling of the history of the Native/Indigenous peoples of North America recounts their story from Creation to the invasion and usurpation of Native lands. As more and more people arrived, The People saw that the new men did not respect the land. The People witnessed the destruction of their Nations and the enslavement of their people. The People fought hard, but eventually agreed to stop fighting and signed treaties.

Many things changed and became more difficult, but The People continued to farm and create crafts. They remembered and told their children, "You are Shawnee. You are Lakota. You are Pima. You Acoma. . . . You are all these Nations of the People." The People held onto their beliefs and customs and found solidarity with other oppressed people. And despite struggles against greed, destruction of their lands, and oppression, The People persisted.

Educator Information
Renowned Acoma Pueblo poet and storyteller Simon J. Ortiz traces the progress of Native/Indigenous people of North America from the time of creation to the present.

Recommended Ages: 6-10

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.00" x 9.50"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$14.95

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Nunavummi Reading Series: Journey to the Winter Camp
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 3;

Winter is coming, and it's time for Qulaut's family to leave their summer home behind. They will need to use their land skills and work together to stay safe.

This book introduces the historical fiction genre and features a pre-contact Inuit family travelling to their winter camp by dogsled.

Educator Information
This book is part of the Nunavummi Reading Series, a Nunavut-developed series that supports literacy learning while teaching readers about the people, traditions, and environment of the Canadian Arctic. Journey to the Winter Camp is a Level 13 book in the series.

Nunavummi Reading Series books have also been officially levelled using the Fountas & Pinnell Text Level Gradientâ„¢ Levelling System. Journey to the Winter Camp's F&P Level is M.

Recommended for ages 6-8.

Additional Information
48 pages | 7.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$7.95

Quantity:
Moses, Me, and Murder: A Barkerville Mystery
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7; 8;

In the first novel in the Barkerville Mystery series, protagonist Ted MacIntosh tries to unravel a suspicious murder with possible fatal consequences.

lt’s summer in 1866 in the Cariboo gold fields, and a man has disappeared. Young Ted learns from the local barber, Moses, that his friend Charles, who was travelling to the gold fields, has failed to arrive. And a forbidding stranger named James Barry has arrived in town wearing a gold nugget pin that belonged to the missing man. What could have happened to him? Was James Barry responsible for his disappearance? Moses and Ted are suspicious – but they’re also afraid for their own safety. Slowly, with several adventures and close calls, they unravel the story of a cruel murder. But have they identified the right criminal?

Shortlisted for the Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction, based on a real unsolved murder that took place in Barkerville, B.C., and set against the exciting backdrop of the Gold Rush era, Moses, Me, and Murder offers a captivating tale of betrayal, thievery, and redemption.

Reviews
"...teachers will find this well-researched resource to be a useful addition in their BC history lessons. As for young people, Moses, Me and Murder is an enjoyable and quick read that will transport the reader back to the early days of British Columbia."
Canadian Materials

Additional Information
This is the second edition of Moses, Me, and Murder, and the first novel in the Barkerville Mystery series. A first edition, published in 1988 and entitled Moses, Me & Murder: A Story of the Cariboo Gold Rush is out of print.

112 pages | 5.00" x 8.00" | 2nd Edition

Authentic Canadian Content
$10.99

Quantity:
Talking Leaves
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Cherokee;
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9; 10;

A work of historical fiction about Sequoyah and the creation of the Cherokee alphabet, from the acclaimed author of Code Talker

Thirteen-year-old Uwohali has not seen his father, Sequoyah, for many years. So when Sequoyah returns to the village, Uwohali is eager to reconnect. But Sequoyah’s new obsession with making strange markings causes friends and neighbors in their tribe to wonder whether he is crazy, or worse—practicing witchcraft. What they don’t know, and what Uwohali discovers, is that Sequoyah is a genius and his strange markings are actually an alphabet representing the sounds of the Cherokee language.

The story of one of the most important figures in Native American history is brought to life for middle grade readers. This text includes a note about the historical Sequoyah, the Cherokee syllabary, a glossary of Cherokee words, and suggestions for further reading in the back matter.

Reviews
* “Bruchac has crafted a tale of depth and universal humanity in this fictionalized account of Sequoyah, the creator of the Cherokee syllabary, and his son, Jesse." —School Library Journal, starred review

“Although the particulars of the novel occur two hundred years ago, the universality of fitting into a blended family and looking for love and acceptance from a once-absent father feel strikingly contemporary." —Horn Book

"A vivid retelling of a pivotal time for the Cherokee nation.” —Kirkus Reviews

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288 pages | 5.19" x 7.81"

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A Girl Called Echo, Vol 1: Pemmican Wars
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Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Echo Desjardins, a 13-year-old Métis girl adjusting to a new home and school, is struggling with loneliness while separated from her mother. Then an ordinary day in Mr. Bee’s history class turns extraordinary, and Echo’s life will never be the same. During Mr. Bee’s lecture, Echo finds herself transported to another time and place—a bison hunt on the Saskatchewan prairie—and back again to the present. In the following weeks, Echo slips back and forth in time. She visits a Métis camp, travels the old fur-trade routes, and experiences the perilous and bygone era of the Pemmican Wars.

Educator & Series Information
Pemmican Wars is the first graphic novel in the A Girl Called Echo series.

The Canadian Indigenous Books for School list recommends this for Grades 5-12 for these subject areas: Arts Education, English Language Arts, Social Studies.

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48 pages | 6.50" x 10.00"

 

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Algonquin Sunset: An Algonquin Quest Novel
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10;

Anokì and his sister Pangì Mahingan have grown up, and now face a decision that will change their lives forever.

Twelve years after Mahingan was wounded battling for his life against the Haudenosaunee warrior known as Ö:nenhste Erhar (Corn Dog), we rejoin his family and learn what fate held for him.

Now, his children, Anokì and Pangì Mahingan, along with their twin cousins Makwa and Wàbek, are grown and have adult responsibilities. Still living with their Algonquin family, they have become a formidable fighting unit with the addition of three Mi´kmaq warriors, E´s, Jilte´g, and the fierce Elue´wiet Ga´qaquj.

However, there is danger in the land of the setting sun, and nothing is more dangerous than what the family is going to encounter from the fierce enemy of their new Anishinaabe allies: the LakÈŸóta.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 12-15.

Series Information
This novel is part of the Algonquin Quest Series, a series of young adult novels from Algonquin author Rick Revelle.

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304 pages | 5.00" x 8.00"

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When We Were Alone
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 10; 11;

When a young girl helps tend to her grandmother’s garden, she begins to notice things that make her curious. Why does her grandmother have long, braided hair and beautifully coloured clothing? Why does she speak another language and spend so much time with her family? As she asks her grandmother about these things, she is told about life in a residential school a long time ago, where all of these things were taken away. When We Were Alone is a story about a difficult time in history, and, ultimately, one of empowerment and strength.

Reviews
"When We Were Alone is rare. It is exquisite and stunning, for the power conveyed by the words Robertson wrote, and for the illustrations that Flett created. I highly recommend it." — Debbie Reese, American Indians in Children's Literature.

"…Robertson handles a delicate task here admirably well: explaining residential schools, that shameful legacy, and making them understandable to small children. It’s a dark history, and the author doesn’t disguise that, but he wisely focuses the grandmother’s tale on how, season by season, the students use creativity, imagination, and patience to retain their sense of identity. A beautifully quiet, bold strength arises from the continued refrain “When we were alone” and in how the children insisted on being themselves. Flett’s gorgeous, skillful illustrations have a flattened, faux naïve feel to them, like construction paper collage, a style that works perfectly with the story. She nicely contrasts the school’s dull browns and grays with the riotous colors surrounding Nókom and gets much expression from her simple silhouettes. Spare, poetic, and moving, this Cree heritage story makes a powerful impression." — Kirkus Reviews

"When We Were Alone addresses the topic of residential schools and, just as importantly, aspects of Cree culture and language. There is such gentleness about When We Were Alone that makes it an appropriate book for the even youngest of readers. Simply put, this is a much-needed book. Highly Recommended." — Dr. Kristen Ferguson, CM Magazine

"Robertson's text moves between the present and the past, the girl's questions and Nókom's memories, which deepen and intensify the quiet, powerful way she lives out her own culture, day by day, in the present. A beautifully rendered story of resisitance and love, this is made all the more luminous by Flett's art - not just by flashes of fuschsia or scarlet among ochre grasses, but by her precisely observed images of the compact bodies of the uniformed children, bowed beneath the weight of the scissors, or lovingly tending each other's hair. Highly recommended." — Deirdre Baker, Toronto Star

Educator Information
Recommended Grades: 3 and under.

Grades 10-11 BC English First Peoples resource for the unit First Steps - Exploring Residential School and Reconciliation through Children's Literature.

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24 pages | 8.50" x 7.50" | colour illustrations 

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Weenipeeg
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8;

The name Weenipeeg (or Winnipeg) is known to mean dirty water. But how did it get that name? Weepipeeg, a story carried on by Elder Bill Ballantyne, is a children’s book that recounts the gripping true events that led to Winnipeg receiving its name. A journey story at its heart, this beautifully illustrated book will have you on the edge of your seat, while it shares important traditional knowledge.

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Dear Canada: These Are My Words: The Residential School Diary of Violet Pesheens
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg;
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7;

Acclaimed author Ruby Slipperjack delivers a haunting novel about a 12-year-old girl's experience at a residential school in 1966.

Violet Pesheens is struggling to adjust to her new life at residential school. She misses her Grandma; she has run-ins with Cree girls; at her "white" school, everyone just stares; and everything she brought has been taken from her, including her name-she is now just a number. But worst of all, she has a fear. A fear of forgetting the things she treasures most: her Anishnabe language; the names of those she knew before; and her traditional customs. A fear of forgetting who she was.

Her notebook is the one place she can record all of her worries, and heartbreaks, and memories. And maybe, just maybe there will be hope at the end of the tunnel.

Drawing from her own experiences at residential school, Ruby Slipperjack creates a brave, yet heartbreaking heroine in Violet, and lets young readers glimpse into an all-too important chapter in our nation's history.

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192 pages | 5.54" x 7.66"

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Hiawatha and the Peacemaker
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Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

Born of Mohawk and Cayuga descent, musical icon Robbie Robertson learned the story of Hiawatha and his spiritual guide, the Peacemaker, as part of the Iroquois oral tradition. Now he shares the same gift of storytelling with a new generation.

Hiawatha was a strong and articulate Mohawk who was chosen to translate the Peacemaker’s message of unity for the five warring Iroquois nations during the 14th century. This message not only succeeded in uniting the tribes but also forever changed how the Iroquois governed themselves—a blueprint for democracy that would later inspire the authors of the U.S. Constitution.

Caldecott Honor–winning illustrator David Shannon brings the journey of Hiawatha and the Peacemaker to life with arresting oil paintings. Together, Robertson and Shannon have crafted a new children’s classic that will both educate and inspire readers of all ages.

Includes a CD featuring a new, original song written and performed by Robbie Robertson.

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48 pages | 9.50" x 11.25"

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Tales From the Big Spirit, The Chief: Mistahimaskwa
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Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6;

On her way to school one day, Sarah is relieved to find the book she’d dropped the day before – shortly after an encounter with a bear. But when she opens it, the story within, about the Cree chief Mistahimaskwa, comes alive. It takes Sarah back to the Saskatchewan Plains of 1832, where the young boy who would become the great chief first learns the ways of his people, to the final days of his life.

The Chief is one book in the Tales from Big Spirit series. Tales from Big Spirit is a unique seven-book graphic novel series that delves into the stories of seven great Indigenous heroes from Canadian history—some already well known and others who deserve to be. Designed to correspond to grades 4–6 social studies curriculums across Canada, these full colour graphic novels could be used in literature circles, novel studies, and book clubs to facilitate discussion of social studies topics. These books will help students make historical connections while promoting important literacy skills. The series also includes:

The Ballad of Nancy April: Shawnadithit, the last remaining member of the Beothuk people of Newfoundland.

The Land of Os: John Ramsay, a Saulteaux man from the west shore of Lake Winnipeg, who, though dispossessed from his land, helped the Icelandic settlers who arrived in 1875 withstand the smallpox epidemic of the following year.

The Peacemaker: Thanadelthur, a young Dene woman enslaved by the Cree, who becomes a guide for the Hudson Bay Company. In 1715 she negotiated a peace between longstanding enemies, the Cree and Dene.

The Poet: Pauline Johnson, born on the Six Nations Reserve, who wrote and performed her work throughout North America, and was a pioneer of Canadian literature.

The Rebel: Gabriel Dumont, his role in the 1885 Northwest Rebellion, and the Métis of Batoche.

The Scout: Tommy Prince, a decorated Aboriginal war hero, and his exploits on the European battlefields of the Second World War.

Tales from the Big Spirit Series Teacher's Guide -
Go to Adult Books>Educator Resources>Literacy

The teacher's guide is designed to help classroom teacher's use the graphic novel series, Tales From Big Spirit, by David Alexander Robertson. The guide provides detailed lessons that meet a wide range of language arts and social studies goals, integrate Indigenous perspectives, and make curricular content more accessible to diverse learners.

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Road Allowance Kitten
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5;

They say, “Home is where the heart is.” For Rosie and Madeline, home also included their pet kitten. Imagine being told you have to leave your home … without your pet. Based on a true story, Road Allowance Kitten gives readers a glimpse into the history of the Road Allowance Métis and their forced removal from their humble, but beloved, homes on the road allowance. Award-winning children’s author Wilfred Burton skillfully shares this story through the eyes of the children involved. The vibrant illustrations by Christina Johns are the perfect accompaniment to this authentic vignette of a little-known part of Prairie history.

Comes with a CD featuring the English and Michif narrations of the book.

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Algonquin Spring: An Algonquin Quest Novel
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10;

Years after a devastating battle, Mahingan and his tribe struggle to recover a lost loved one.

Six years earlier in the fourteenth century, Mahingan and his tribe fought the Battle of the Falls against the Haudenosaunee. There were many losses, and Mahingan thought he had lost his wife, Wàbananang (Morning Star). But after the battle, he learned she was still alive, taken captive by the Haudenosaunee. Now on a desperate quest to rescue her, Mahingan and his small family are wintering north of the Ottawa River near present-day Lachute, Quebec. If they are to have any hope of recovering Wàbananang, though, they must first survive until spring.

At the same time, over 2,000 kilometres away in present-day Newfoundland, events taking place will affect four Native tribes: Mahingan’s, a group of Mi’kmaq, a Beothuk group, and a band of Haudenosaunee warriors led by Mahingan’s old nemesis, Ò:nenhste Erhar (Corn Dog) — a fierce Mohawk War Chief and Wàbananang’s captor.

Along the way, Mahingan’s brother, Mitigomij, will reveal his true self and powers. Then, an influential Mi’kmaq legend puts a new, powerful twist on events, and threatens to send things spiraling out of Mahingan’s control.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 12-15.

Series Information
This novel is part of the Algonquin Quest Series, a series of young adult novels from Algonquin author Rick Revelle.

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296 pages | 5.00" x 8.00"

 

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How I Became a Ghost: A Choctaw Trail of Tears Story
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Choctaw;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

A Choctaw boy tells the story of his tribe’s removal from its Mississippi homeland, and how its exodus to the American West led him to become a ghost — one able to help those left behind.

Series Information
This is the first book in the How I Became a Ghost Series by Tim Tingle.

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148 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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Maggie and the Chocolate War
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Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 3; 4;

Maggie has been saving her delivery-job money for weeks to buy her best friend, Jo, a chocolate bar for her birthday. It's 1947, and while the war is over and ration tickets are gone, food prices are going up. Then it is announced that the price of chocolate is going up too - now Maggie can never afford to buy a chocolate bar! And neither can the other kids. Maggie and her friends leap into action and wage a strike against the price hike. But what can a bunch of kids do? More than you think?

Based on real events, Maggie and the Chocolate War is filled with photographs and newspaper documents covering an amazing historical moment that united children from British Columbia to the Atlantic coast.

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94 pages | 6.50" x 8.02"

 

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$7.50

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My First Métis Lobstick
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: 4;

Leah Marie Dorion’s My First Métis Lobstick takes young readers back to Canada’s fur trade era by focusing on a Métis family’s preparations for a lobstick celebration and feast in the boreal forest. Through the eyes of a young boy, we see how important lobstick making and ceremony was to the Métis community. From the Great Lakes to the present-day Northwest Territories, lobstick poles—important cultural and geographical markers, which merged Cree, Ojibway, and French-Canadian traditions—dotted the landscape of our great northern boreal forest. This little-known aspect of Métis history vividly comes to life through Leah Marie Dorion’s crisp prose and stunning gallery-quality artwork.

Educator Information
This is a dual-language picture book delivered in English and Michif.  It includes a CD.

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72 pages | 10.98" x 8.54" | Michif translation by Normal Fleury

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Manny's Memories
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4;

Manny's Memories, by Author Ken Caron with his daughter Angela Caron, introduces us to the Métis community of Round Prairie, Saskatchewan through the eyes of a young boy growing up in the 1940s. Manny shares his boyhood memories of the once vibrant community not too far from Saskatoon's city limits. Though rural life at the time called for hard work, self-sufficiency, and generosity, there was always time to have fun and to enjoy being a young Métis boy. Artist Donna Lee Dumont's visual expression of Manny's Memories helps us see the world as Ken, called "Manny" in his youth, remembers it. Norman Fleury's accompanying Michif translation and narration returns to the language which Manny often hears as a boy. Manny's Memories leaves us with a rare and satisfying glimpse of life not so long ago.

Educator Information
Grade Level: Primary
Format: Book/CD, English/Michif-Cree

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36 pages | 10.94" x 8.46"

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Home to Medicine Mountain
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5;

Two young brothers are separated from their family and sent to live in a government-run Indian residential school in the 1930s—an experience shared by generations of Native American children throughout North America. At these schools, children were forbidden to speak their Indian languages and made to unlearn their Indian ways. Sadly, they were often not able to go home to their families for summer vacation.

Native American artist Judith Lowry based this story on the experiences of her father and her Uncle Stanley. Judith and author Chiori Santiago tenderly relate how Stanley and Benny Len found their way home by train one summer. Inspired by their dreams of home and the memories of their grandmother's stories, the boys embark on an adventurous journey from the harsh residential school to their triumphant welcome home at Susanville, California, in the shadow of Yo-Tim Yamne (Medicine Mountain).

Awards

  • American Book Award - Before Columbus Foundation
  • Skipping Stones Honor Award - Skipping Stones Magazine

Reviews
"The real-life experiences of Lowry's father and uncle fuel this account of two Native American brothers in California, sent to a government-run boarding school in the 1930s to unlearn their traditional ways. While the book discloses a sad chapter in the long history of the disenfranchisement of Native Americans, it will also resonate with any kid who has been homesick." - Publisher's Weekly

Educator Information
Guided Reading: N
Lexile: 520L
Interest Level: Grades 3 - 5
Reading Level: Grades 3 - 4

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32 pages | 10.00" x 8.50"

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The White Oneida
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Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

In her fourth historical novel dealing with British North America and the American Revolution, Jean Rae Baxter focuses on Broken Trail, a young boy who was born white but captured and adopted by the Oneida people. The great Mohawk leader Thayendanegea – known to Euro-Canadians as Joseph Brant – has chosen Broken Trail to assist him in the daunting task of uniting all the tribes and nations with the goal of establishing a country of their own. In preparation, Broken Trail must attend a Christian boarding school for native youth, where he soon finds that he has to gain the trust of young men from many different tribes whose ancient enmities lie barely concealed beneath the surface. With the help of Yellowbird, the only woman student, he discovers that the school – racist in the extreme – is a place of secrets where appearances can be deceiving and loyalty is sometimes proven in unexpected ways. As a first step, Brant sends Broken Trail on a long journey to meet with Tecumseh, the young Shawnee leader, to begin the work of union. In this tale of intrigue and adventure, Baxter once again demonstrates her ability to convert the past into living history.

Series Information
This is the fourth book in the "Forging a Nation" series. Other titles in this series include The Way Lies North, Broken Trail, Freedom Bound, and Hope's Journey.

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280 pages | 5.75" x 7.62"

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I Am Algonquin: An Algonquin Quest Novel
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10;

This book paints a vivid picture of the original peoples of North America before the arrival of Europeans. The novel follows the story of Mahingan and his family as they live the traditional Algonquin way of life in what is now Ontario in the early 14th century. Along the way we learn about the search for moose and the dramatic rare woodland buffalo hunt, conflicts with other Native nations, and the dangers of wolves and wolverines. We also witness the violent game of lacrosse, the terror of a forest fire, and the rituals that allow Algonquin boys to be declared full-grown men.

But warfare is also part of their lives, and signs point to a defining conflict between Mahingan's nation, its allies the Omàmiwinini (Algonquin), Ouendat (Huron), and the Nippissing against the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois). The battle's aftermath may open the door to future journeys by Mahingan and his followers.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 12-15.

Series Information
This novel is part of the Algonquin Quest Series, a series of young adult novels from Algonquin author Rick Revelle.

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280 pages | 5.00" x 8.00"

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The Trail of Tears
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Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Cherokee;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4;

In 1838, settlers moving west forced the great Cherokee Nation, and their chief John Ross, to leave their home land and travel 1,200 miles to Oklahoma. An epic story of friendship, war, hope, and betrayal.

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Not My Girl
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Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3; 4;

Nothing will stop a strong-minded young Inuit girl from learning how to read.

Olemaun is eight and knows a lot of things. But she does not know how to read. She must travel to the outsiders' school to learn, ignoring her father's warning of what will happen there.

The nuns at the school take her Inuit name and call her Margaret. They cut off her long hair and force her to do chores. She has only one thing left -- a book about a girl named Alice, who falls down a rabbit hole.

Margaret's tenacious character draws the attention of a black-cloaked nun who tries to break her spirit at every turn. But she is more determined than ever to read.

By the end, Margaret knows that, like Alice, she has traveled to a faraway land and stood against a tyrant, proving herself to be brave and clever.

Based on the true story of Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, and complemented by stunning illustrations, When I Was Eight makes the bestselling Fatty Legs accessible to young children. Now they, too, can meet this remarkable girl who reminds us what power we hold when we can read.

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Babs' Adventures: Stranger at the Creek
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6;

When eight-year-old Babs Thompson and her brother, James, encounter a stranger in a secluded creek, they find a mystery, and many questions that have no answers. In the wilderness, miles away from civilization, a man has lived for twenty years, his desire for privacy earning him the title of hermit. With a gift for healing, his unknown past shrouded in mystery, the stranger at the creek has only one friend, Babs’ grandfather.

This beautifully bound hard-cover edition makes an excellent gift for librarians, teachers, parents and of course, children, who wish to learn more about Cree culture. Set in the 1950’s in a fictional Cree community, this book is an excellent example of how parents and grandparents of long ago taught a lot of lessons through local folklore, history, and story telling, weaving virtues throughout them. It was a good time when families were connected daily, especially in the evenings when they would spend time together.

Reviews
"Babs' Adventures is sure to be a hit with teachers and parents, as children enjoy Babs' exciting adventures while learning about Cree culture and life in the 1950s." - M. D. Meyer

Educator Information
This book is the first book in the Babs' Adventures series, a chapter book series about a young Cree girl and her adventures.

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88 pages | Hardcover

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Babs' Adventures: The Storm on the Lake
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6;

Nine-year-old Babs Thompson and her ten-year-old brother James are so excited to be going for a trip on the S.S. Keenora with their mother and grandmother. Departing from Warren’s Landing, they will sail to Winnipeg where they will shop and visit a relative, Grandma’s sister, whom she hasn’t seen in years.

Aboard the S.S. Keenora, they meet and make a friend, a student who is going to residential school. The famous ten day heat wave of 1953 causes many on the ship to suffer from heat exhaustion – but it is nothing compared to what is in store for them on their way home!

Educator Information
This book is the second book in the Babs' Adventures series, a chapter book series about a young Cree girl and her adventures.

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127 pages | Hardcover 

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Babs' Adventures: Christmas on the Trapline
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6;

Ten-year-old Babs Thompson’s dad is missing, and Babs and her brother, James, are determined to find him. With two of their sled dogs, Brutus and Kona, they set off on snowshoes into the forest, traveling many miles before finding their father – injured and surrounded by a pack of wolves!

Christmas on the Trapline is a children’s historical fiction set in the 1950’s near the Cree community of Norway House, Manitoba.

Educator Information
This book is the third book in the Babs' Adventures series, a chapter book series about a young Cree girl and her adventures.

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69 pages | Paperback

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A Very Small Rebellion
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

“You must stand up for your way of life in the forest and protect it against the dangers that menace it.”

Paul Gauthier heard the voice in his dream and woke to stare at the poster on the wall of his bedroom. The sad, angry eyes of the man on the poster looked down at him. It was as if the poster had come alive.

The man in the poster is Louis Riel, and in this powerfully wrought historical novel by Jan Truss, Paul Gauthier has been chosen to play Riel in a school play at a time in his life when new menaces threaten the small Métis settlement where he lives with his family.

Convinced that such menaces can be fought with the same spirit that emboldened Riel, Paul and his young Indian friend Simon Buffalo set out to thwart a government plan to raze the settlement to make room for a new highway.

An essay by Jack Chambers complements the novel, weaving through it the parallel history of the Riel Rebellion of 1885, and the events and confrontations of another time.

That the spirit of Louis Riel lives on can be heard in the voices of the characters in this remarkable novel on every page; for as the essayist writes, “The spirit of Louis Riel is neither old-fashioned nor modern, but timeless.”

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160 pages | 5.00" x 8.00"

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Storm at Batoche
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

During a fierce prairie storm, James falls out of his family’s wagon and his calls for help are lost in the howl of the wind. After his parents vanish into the blizzard, a man on horseback appears and takes James to the safety and warmth of his small cabin. The man will only say that his name is Louis. While he prepares an evening meal of gallette, Louis promises to teach James how to make it in the morning. When he does, James declares his mother makes the same type of bread but she calls it “bannock,” not “gallette,” underscoring the differences and similarities between their cultures.

This imaginary encounter between Louis Riel and a young boy brings to light how insignificant the differences between people are and the tragic consequences of not remembering how much we all share. The historical context for the story is found in the Afterword. On the last page of the book there is an easy recipe for gallette/bannock.

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Ghost Dance
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Paiute (Piute);
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

When the bountiful world of their ancestors was no more, the Paiute prophets had visions of a dance that would restore it. The ghost dance movement began in the U.S. in the 1800s, in hope as native peoples came together to dance for their shared dream. The dream failed and they tried again. Again the dream failed tragically. But the vision and the dream still call out to all people, envisioning a future when all Indian peoples would be united, disease would vanish, and the earth would be regenerated and restored. 

Reviews
"McLerran's elegant, spare text begins by describing the result of white settlers' relentless westward movement in the U.S... [Paiute visionaries] dreamed that if Native peoples danced, the white people would disappear and the ghosts of the wildlife that had been decimated would return... [Attempts at coming together in a sacred, non-violent ceremony ended in violence to the Native Americans, as their actions were interpreted as warlike.] McLerran encourages readers to hold on to the vision of the Dance, and to unite across the boundaries of culture and politics that we have created, to heal the world... [Morin's] evocative paintings... glow with the golden colors of the sun-drenched prairie, and exhibit a dramatic use of light... This stunning book will hold great appeal for environmentally conscious readers." - School Library Journal

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32 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

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$14.95

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Peter Fidler and the Métis
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;

Peter Fidler and the Métis is an excellent primer on Métis history and culture for middle years readers. The book is the personal reflection of Métis artist and author Donna Lee Dumont on her direct ancestors, the Hudson’s Bay Company explorer and mapmaker Peter Fidler and his Cree wife, Mary Mackegonne. Interwoven with this self-reflection is the author’s discussion of the formation of Métis culture during the fur trade, the racism that forced many Métis to deny their heritage, and the proud place that the Métis now have as one of Canada’s founding peoples. Writing about her childhood, which consisted of many summers spent picking and eating berries and learning about Aboriginal medicinal and healing traditions from her grandmother and her elders, Donna Lee Dumont poignantly takes the reader back to a gentler, more environmentally friendly time. She concludes by writing about her pride in being a Métis artist, author, educator, mother, and grandmother. Lavishly illustrated in bright, vibrant acrylics, Peter Fidler and the Métis is one woman’s enchanting journey to document her Métis identity.

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$15.00

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Buffalo Bird Girl: A Hidatsa Story
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3; 4; 5;

"I was born in an earth lodge by the mouth of the Knife River, in what is now North Dakota, three years after the smallpox winter." - Buffalo Bird Woman

Born in the 1830s, Buffalo Bird Girl was a member of the Hidatsa people, a Native American community that lived in permanent villages along the Missouri River on the Great Plains. Like other girls her age, Buffalo Bird Girl learned the ways of her people through watching, listening and then doing. She helped plant crops in the spring, tended the fields through the summer - scaring off birds and other animals, as well as hungry boys! - and in autumn joined in the harvest. She also learned to prepare animal skins, dry meat and perform other household duties. Along with her chores, however, there was time for playing games with friends or training her dog. Her family also visited the nearby trading post, where all sorts of magnificent things from the white man's settlements in the East could be seen.

Interweaving the actual words and stories of Buffalo Bird Woman with his artwork and archival photographs, award-winning author and artist S.D. Nelson has woven a poignant yet vibrant story, beautifully capturing the spirit of Buffalo Bird Girl and her lost way of life. The book includes a historical timeline.

Reviews
"The extraordinary illustration of this handsome volume begins with the endpaper maps and features acrylic paintings of the Hidatsa world reminiscent of traditional Plains Indian art. Pencil drawings and relevant, carefully labeled photographs round out the exquisite design. All the artwork both supports and adds to the text. An extensive author’s note and timeline supplement this beautiful tribute." —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"Nelson's quiet, respectful tone capably balances the factual details of daily life in the Hidatsa tribe with the obvious joy and nostalgia Buffalo Bird Girl feels toward her childhood." —The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"As a writer, storyteller, and traditional artist of the Sioux people, his perspective is genuine and effectively portrayed. This book would be enjoyable for anyone interested in history, but would also be an effective resource in the classroom to support the curriculum.”—Library Media Connection

"Nelson's acrylic paintings and b&w pencil drawings are intriguingly interlaced with the photographs, contrasting Native American figures in blunt profile with harvest colors and background textures that mimic dried spears of grass, leather skins, and basket weaves." — Publishers Weekly"

Educator Information
This fascinating picture book biography tells the childhood story of Buffalo Bird Woman. Through her true story, readers will learn what it was like to be part of this Native American community that lived along the Missouri River in the Dakotas, a society that depended more on agriculture for food and survival than on hunting. Children will relate to Buffalo Bird Girl’s routine of chores and playing with friends, and they will also be captivated by her lifestyle and the dangers that came with it.

Recommended Ages: 6-10

Additional Information
56 pages | 10.50" x 10.25"

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$27.95

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PÄ«sim Finds Her Miskanow
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5;

PÄ«sim Finds Her Miskanow is about a week in the life of PÄ«sim, a young Cree woman living in the late 1600s. The 1993 archaeological excavation of the remains of a woman and her belongings from Nagami Bay at South Indian Lake, Manitoba, was the inspiration for the story. In the story, PÄ«sim begins to both recognize her purpose for being and develop her gifts for fulfilling her purpose. This beautifully illustrated book includes drawings of artifacts, definitions and descriptions, historical facts and information, Cree songs and words, maps, recipes, and much more.

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$29.00

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Freedom Bound
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

In Freedom Bound eighteen-year-old Charlotte sails from Canada to Charleston in the beleaguered Thirteen Colonies to join her new husband Nick. During these final months of the American Revolution, she must muster all her wit and courage when she has to rescue Nick from being tortured as a spy in an alligator-infested South Carolina swamp. She must also find ways to bring freedom to a pair of teenage runaway slaves she has befriended. Freedom Bound delivers a frank and realistic picture of the slave system and a powerful account of what was at stake for both white and black Loyalists as they prepared to find a new home in the country that was soon to be Canada. Like The Way Lies North and Broken Trail, the two novels that preceded it, Freedom Bound contains a wealth of carefully researched historical details of one of the least known chapters of our history.

Series Information
This is the third book in the "Forging a Nation" series. Other titles in this series include The Way Lies North, Broken Trail, The White Oneida, and Hope's Journey.

Additional Information
246 pages | 5.25" x 7.63"

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$11.95

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The Birchbark House Series (book 4): Chickadee
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Anishinaabeg; Ojibwe;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

Winner of the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction, Chickadee is the first novel of a new arc in the critically acclaimed Birchbark House series by New York Times bestselling author Louise Erdrich.

Twin brothers Chickadee and Makoons have done everything together since they were born—until the unthinkable happens and the brothers are separated.

Desperate to reunite, both Chickadee and his family must travel across new territories, forge unlikely friendships, and experience unexpected moments of both unbearable heartache and pure joy. And through it all, Chickadee draws from the strength of his namesake, the chickadee, to carry him home.

Chickadee continues the story of one Ojibwe family's journey through one hundred years in America. In a starred review, School Library Journal proclaimed, "Readers will be more than happy to welcome little Chickadee into their hearts."

The paperback edition includes additional material, such as an interview with the author and activities. This story of Chickadee and his family is based on Louise Erdrich’s own family history.

Series Information
This is the fourth book in the Birchbark House Series, a series of Indigenous juvenile fiction novels written by Ojibwe writer Louise Erdrich.

Additional Information
224 pages | 5.12" x 7.62"

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$8.50

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