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Religious Content

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God is Red: A Native View of Religion, 30th Anniversary Edition
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;

First published in 1972, Vine Deloria Jr.'s God Is Red remains the seminal work on Native religious views, asking new questions about our species and our ultimate fate. Celebrating 3 decades in publication with a special 30th-anniversary edition, this classic work reminds us to learn "that we are a part of nature, not a transcendent species with no responsibilities to the natural world." It is time again to listen to Vine Deloria Jr.'s powerful voice, telling us about religious life that is independent from Christianity and that reveres the interconnectedness of all living things.

Authentic Indigenous Text
$29.95

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In Those Days: Collected Writings on Arctic History Book 4, Shamans, Spirits, and Faith in the Inuit North
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: University/College;

In this new collection, Kenn Harper shares tales of Inuit and Christian beliefs and how these came to coexist—and sometimes clash—in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. During this period, Anglican and Catholic missionaries came to the North to proselytize among the Inuit, with often unexpected and sometimes tragic results. This collection includes stories of shamans and priests, hymns and ajaja songs, and sealskin churches, drawing on first-hand accounts to show how Christianity changed life in the North in big and small ways. This volume also includes dozens of rare, historical photographs.

Series Information
This in the fourth book in the In Those Days series, a historical series that collects writings on Arctic history.

Additional Information
250 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$19.95

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Little Athapapuskow: A Metis Love Story
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Little Athapapuskow is collection of poems named after a lake Guy Freedman grew up on near Flin Flon, Manitoba. They represent his efforts to challenge Catholicism and its complicity with the Confederation project, which dismantled the New Nation developing in the Canadian Northwest. The poems are organized into three parts—past, present, and future—and they address the inter-generational impacts of the Church on his family in relation to the doctrine of the Holy Trinity. This book is his love song to his home and to his country.

Educator Information
Recommended resource for Grades 10-12 English Language Arts and Social Studies.

Contains poems about the history of the Metis people, family, love, celebration of culture, colonialism, religion, violence.

Caution: Some poems contain strong language and mature subject matter, such as discussions of violence, alcoholism, and sexuality.

Additional Information
86 pages | 7.25" x 5.75 " 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$20.00

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The Great Evil: Christianity, the Bible, and the Native American Genocide
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American;
Grade Levels: University/College;

In this account of the history between Indigenous Peoples and the United States government, readers will learn the role of the bible played in the perpetration of genocide, massive land theft, and the religious suppression and criminalization of Native ceremonies and spirituality.

Chris Mato Nunpa, a Dakota man, discusses this dishonorable and darker side of American history that is rarely studied, if at all. Out of a number of rationales used to justify the killing of Native Peoples and theft their lands, the author will discuss a biblical rationale, including the “chosen people” idea, the “promised land” notion, and the genocidal commands of the Old Testament God.

Mato Nunpa’s experience with fundamentalist and evangelical missionaries when he was growing up, his studies in Indigenous Nations history at the University of Minnesota, and his affiliation with the International Association of Genocide Scholars (IAGS) were three important factors in his motivation for writing this book.

Additional Information
256 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$26.95

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What Has No Place, Remains: The Challenges for Indigenous Religious Freedom in Canada Today
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

The desire to erase the religions of Indigenous Peoples is an ideological fixture of the colonial project that marked the first century of Canada’s nationhood. While the ban on certain Indigenous religious practices was lifted after the Second World War, it was not until 1982 that Canada recognized Aboriginal rights, constitutionally protecting the diverse cultures of Indigenous Peoples. As former prime minister Stephen Harper stated in Canada’s apology for Indian residential schools, the desire to destroy Indigenous cultures, including religions, has no place in Canada today. And yet Indigenous religions continue to remain under threat.

Framed through a postcolonial lens, What Has No Place, Remains analyses state actions, responses, and decisions on matters of Indigenous religious freedom. The book is particularly concerned with legal cases, such as Ktunaxa Nation v. British Columbia (2017), but also draws on political negotiations, such as those at Voisey’s Bay, and standoffs, such as the one at Gustafsen Lake, to generate a more comprehensive picture of the challenges for Indigenous religious freedom beyond Canada’s courts. With particular attention to cosmologically significant space, this book provides the first comprehensive assessment of the conceptual, cultural, political, social, and legal reasons why religious freedom for Indigenous Peoples is currently an impossibility in Canada.

Reviews
"There is no book that takes on the ambitious task that What Has No Place, Remains does, especially in the context of Canada and the Indigenous practices and beliefs linking Indigenous People to the land." - Michael McNally, Department of Religion, Carleton College

"Working at the intersection of religious, political, legal, and Indigenous studies, this book’s multi-disciplinary framework yields numerous insights, both analytically and prescriptively." - Greg Johnson, Department of Religious Studies, University of Colorado Boulder

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
Preface
A Comment on Terminology

Introduction: Colonialism and the Challenges for Religious Freedom

1. The Depth of Religious Freedom
2. Secularization, Dispossession and Forced Deprivatization
3. Religions Plus? Competing Frameworks of Indigenous Religious Freedom
4. Dealing with Diversity Poorly and the Gustafsen Lake Standoff
5. The Duty to Consult and Accommodate
6. The Potential and Limits of International Mechanisms of Redress

Conclusion: Challenges for Reconciliation

Notes
Bibliography

Additional Information
280 pages | 5.90" x 9.00"



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$28.95

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