Shopping Basket Shopping Basket      Sign Up / Sign In     
ONLINE SALES: 250.758.4287  or  Toll Free 1.888.278.2202
RETAIL STORE: 250.585.1549

Indigenous Peoples of the United States

1 - 15 of 146 Results
Sort By
Go To   of 10
>
A Boy Called Slow
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Sioux; Lakota;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

A proud Lakota Sioux grows into manhood acting with careful deliberation, determination, and bravery, he eventually earns the new name of Sitting Bull.

Authentic Indigenous Text
$8.50

Quantity:
A Native American Thought of It
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7;

Inventiveness and ingenuity from North America's First Nations.

Everyone knows that moccasins, canoes and toboggans were invented by the Aboriginal people of North America, but did you know that they also developed their own sign language, as well as syringe needles and a secret ingredient in soda pop?

Depending on where they lived, Aboriginal communities relied on their ingenuity to harness the resources available to them. Some groups, such as the Iroquois, were particularly skilled at growing and harvesting food. From them, we get corn and wild rice, as well as maple syrup.

Other groups, including the Sioux and Comanche of the plains, were exceptional hunters. Camouflage, fish hooks and decoys were all developed to make the task of catching animals easier. And even games-lacrosse, hockey and volleyball -- have Native American roots.

Other clever inventions and innovations include:

* Diapers
* Asphalt
* Megaphones
* Hair conditioner
* Surgical knives
* Sunscreen.

With descriptive photos and information-packed text, this book explores eight different categories in which the creativity of First Nations peoples from across the continent led to remarkable inventions and innovations, many of which are still in use today.

Series Information
This book is a part of the We Thought of It series, a series which takes readers on a fascinating journey across the world's second largest continent to discover how aspects of its culture have spread around the globe.

Additional Information
48 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$9.95

Quantity:
A River Lost
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

A River Lost is the familiar story of an ancient culture infringed upon and altered forever by modern technology. It is the story of how the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam led to the destruction of a way of life for members of the Arrow Lakes Tribe. Sinee mat and her great-grandmother Toopa tell the engaging story of life on the Columbia River, before and after the dam.

Additional Information

32 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$11.95

Quantity:
A River Ran Wild
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2;

A River Ran Wild is the True Story of the History, the Polluting and the Clean-up of the Nashua River.


From the author of the beloved classic The Great Kapok Tree, A River Ran Wild tells a story of restoration and renewal. Learn how the modern-day descendants of the Nashua Indians and European settlers were able to combat pollution and restore the beauty of the Nashua River in Massachusetts.

$11.99

Quantity:
An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States for Young People
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10;

Spanning more than 400 years, this classic bottom-up history examines the legacy of Indigenous peoples’ resistance, resilience, and steadfast fight against imperialism.

Going beyond the story of America as a country “discovered” by a few brave men in the “New World,” Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity.

The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history.

Reviews
“An important corrective to conventional narratives of our nation’s history . . . . An accessible, engaging, and necessary addition to school libraries and classrooms. An excellent read, dismantling American mythologies and fostering critical reasoning about history and current events.” —Kirkus Reviews, Starred Review

“This adaptation of An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States (2014) should be required reading for all middle and high schoolers—and their teachers . . . . There is much to commend here: the lack of sugar-coating, the debunking of origin stories, the linking between ideology and actions, the well-placed connections between events past and present, the quotes from British colonizers and American presidents that leave no doubt as to their violent intentions . . . . The resistance continues, and this book urges all readers to consider their own roles, whether as bystanders or upstanders.” —Booklist, Starred Review

“Dunbar-Ortiz’s narrative history is clear, and the adapters give readers ample evidence and perspective to help them to engage with the text. A highly informative book for libraries serving high school students.”—School Library Journal, Starred Review

“This is the book I wish I’d had when I started teaching. An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People represents a fundamental challenge to the textbooks that celebrate ‘liberty,’ ‘freedom,’ and the ‘rise of the American nation’ but fail to recognize the humanity—or often even the existence—of the Indigenous peoples who were here first, and are still here. Our students will see the history of this country much more clearly when we put Indigenous people’s lives at the center.” —Bill Bigelow, curriculum editor, Rethinking Schools, and codirector, Zinn Education Project

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 12+

Additional Information
272 pages | 5.49" x 7.97"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$24.95

Quantity:
At the Mountain's Base
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Cherokee;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

A family, separated by duty and distance, waits for a loved one to return home in this lyrical picture book celebrating the bonds of a Cherokee family and the bravery of history-making women pilots.

At the mountain's base sits a cabin under an old hickory tree. And in that cabin lives a family -- loving, weaving, cooking, and singing. The strength in their song sustains them through trials on the ground and in the sky, as they wait for their loved one, a pilot, to return from war.

With an author's note that pays homage to the true history of Native American U.S. service members like WWII pilot Ola Mildred "Millie" Rexroat, this is a story that reveals the roots that ground us, the dreams that help us soar, and the people and traditions that hold us up.

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.38" x 11.81"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$23.99

Quantity:
Baby Rattlesnake
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Pawnee;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2;

A Native American (Pawnee) tale of family love and forgiveness.

Baby Rattlesnake wants a rattle like his older siblings have. His crying keeps the rattlesnake elders up all night so his parents give him a new rattle. Sure enough, he misuses his new rattle. When he tries to scare the chief's daughter, she steps on his rattle and crushes it. Sad and defeated, he returns to his forgiving family who give him "big rattlesnake hugs."

Educator Information
Guided Reading: K
Lexile: AD550L
Interest Level: Grades K - 3
Reading Level: Grades 3 - 3

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.25" x 11.25" | Told by Te Ata, Adapted by Lynn Moroney

Authentic Indigenous Text
$15.95

Quantity:
Bearwalker
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

Baron has always been fascinated by bears—their gentle strength and untamed power. But the Bearwalker legend, passed down by his Mohawk ancestors, tells of a different kind of creature—a terrible mix of human and animal that looks like a bear but is really a bloodthirsty monster.

The tale never seemed to be more than a scary story . . . until a class camping trip deep in the Adirondacks, when Baron comes face-to-face with an evil being that is all too real.

Reviews
“This fast-paced survival story is a great read for mystery fans, and it also addresses the delicate balance between humans and nature.”— School Library Journal (starred review)

“Bruchac spins a striking story, filled with interesting information about bears, chilling moments around the campfire, and life–or–death chase scenes. Readers will return again and again to this adventure tale.”— Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books

Additional Information
240 pages | 5.12" x 7.62"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$8.50

Quantity:
Beaver Steals Fire: A Salish Coyote Story
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Salish;
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

A long time ago, fire belonged only to the animals in the land above, not to those on the earth below. Curlew, keeper of the sky world, guarded fire and kept it from the earth. Coyote, however, devised a clever plan to steal fire, aided by Grizzly Bear, Wren, Snake, Frog, Eagle, and Beaver. These brave and resourceful animal beings raided the land above and risked all to steal fire from Curlew.
 
Beaver Steals Fire is an ancient and powerful tale springing from the hearts and experiences of the Salish people of Montana. Steeped in the rich and culturally vital storytelling tradition of the tribe, this tale teaches both respect for fire and awareness of its significance, themes particularly relevant today.
 
This unforgettable version of the story is told by Salish elder Johnny Arlee and beautifully illustrated by tribal artist Sam Sandoval.
 
Reviews
"Beaver Steals Fire: A Salish Coyote Story is a picture book rendition of a story directly from the cultural tradition of the Salish people of Montana. Retold by Salish elder Johnny Arlee, and wonderfully illustrated in full color by tribal artist Sam Sandoval, Beaver Steals Fire recounts how the animals worked together to obtain fire and help prepare the world for inhabitation by human beings. Beaver Steals Fire is presented with the full support of The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal Division of Fire; a note to the reader at the beginning asks those who use Beaver Steals Fire in the classroom or others who read it aloud to orally tell or discuss the story only in winter, when snow is on the ground, as this is a strongly ingrained part of tribal seasonal tradition. A beautifully presented legend, highly recommended." — Children's Bookwatch, February 2006

Additional Information
64 pages | 7.50" x 10.00"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$22.50

Quantity:
Berry Magic
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Alaska Native; Yupik;
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

Long ago, the only berries on the tundra were hard, tasteless, little crowberries. As Anana watches the ladies complain bitterly while picking berries for the Fall Festival, she decides to use her magic to help. "Atsa-ii-yaa (Berry), Atsa-ii-yaa (Berry), Atsaukina!" (Be a berry!), Anana sings under the full moon turning four dolls into little girls that run and tumble over the tundra creating patches of fat, juicy berries: blueberries, cranberries, salmonberries, and raspberries. The next morning Anana and the ladies fill basket after basket with berries for the Fall Festival. Thanks to Anana, there are plenty of tasty berries for the agutak (Eskimo tee cream) at the festival and forevermore. As she did with THE EYE OF THE NEEDLE (praised by the New York Times Book Review, a San Francisco Chronicle Choice, and a Maryland Black-Eyed Susan Picture Book Award winner), Yup'ik Eskimo elder Betty Huffmon shared this folktale with author/illustrator Teri Sloat, who brings it to life with her delightful illustrations.

Reviews
“Sloat collaborates with Huffmon, a Yup'ik storyteller, to infuse a traditional ‘origins’ tale with the joy of creating. Hearing the old women of her village grumble that they have only tasteless crowberries for the fall feast’s akutaq—described as ‘Eskimo ice cream,’ though the recipe at the end includes mixing in shredded fish and lard—young Anana carefully fashions three dolls, then signs and dances them to life. Away the bound, to cover the hills with cranberries, blueberries, and salmonberries. Sloat dresses her smiling figures in mixes of furs and brightly patterned garb, and sends them tumbling exuberantly through grassy tundra scenes as wildlife large and small gathers to look on. . . . Young readers will be captivated by the action, and by Anana’s infectious delight.”— Kirkus Reviews

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.32" x 9.90"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$16.95

Quantity:
Black Elk's Vision: A Lakota Story
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6;

Told from the Native American point of view, Black Elk’s Vision provides a unique perspective on American history. From recounting the visions Black Elk had as a young boy, to his involvement in the battles of Little Big Horn and Wounded Knee, as well as his journeys to New York City and Europe with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, this biographical account of Black Elk—an Oglala-Lakota medicine man (1863–1950)—follows him from childhood through adulthood.

S. D. Nelson tells the story of Black Elk through the medicine man’s voice, bringing to life what it was like to be Native American in the mid-to-late nineteenth century and early twentieth century. The Native people found their land overrun by the Wha-shi-choos, or White Man, the buffalo slaughtered for sport and to purposely eliminate their main food source, and their people gathered onto reservations. Through it all, Black Elk clung to his childhood visions that planted the seeds to help his people—and all people—understand their place in the circle of life. The book includes archival images, a timeline, a bibliography, an index, and Nelson’s signature art.

Reviews
“A fine choice for story hours, this will also find wide curricular use.” —Booklist
 
“A modern-day story in the Sioux tradition of storytelling.” —Winston-Salem Journal
 
“Splendid acrylic artwork captures the action, humor, and spirit of the tale. A solid addition to collections of Native American tales and an enjoyable read-aloud.” —School Library Journal
 
“Nelson pulls it off with his confident style as a storyteller . . . polished illustrations . . . informative, well written.” —Kirkus Reviews

Educator Information
F&P level: U
F&P genre: B

Additional Information
48 pages | 10.50" x 10.37"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$26.95

Quantity:
Black Sheep, White Crow and Other Windmill Tales: Stories from Navajo Country
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7; 8;

When Kameron moves to his grandma's sheep camp on the Navajo Reservation, he leaves behind his cell phone reception and his friends. The young boy's world becomes even stranger when Kameron takes the sheep out to the local windmill and meets an old storyteller. As the seasons turn, the old man weaves eight tales that teach the deeper story of the Diné country and the Diné people.

Reviews
“A wonderful set of stories that encompass the past, present, and future of the Navajos. It encourages [readers] to be determined, disciplined, and motivated as they move through life and make stories of their own.”—Edison Eskeets, Diné runner, artist, educator, and first Diné trader at Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site

Awards

  • Winner of the 2018 Skipping Stones Honor Award for Multicultural and International Books

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 9-13

Contents
Preface
Shįįgo—Summer

  • Black Sheep, White Crow
  • The Animals Who Wanted to Be What They Were Not

’Aak’eedgo—Autumn

  • The Rattling Bones
  • The Ring with Three Stones

Haigo—Winter

  • The Heart of a Rider
  • The Ugly Dog

DÄ…Ä…go—Spring

  • The Boy Who Became Coyote
  • The Flint Bear

Author’s Notes
Notes on Navajo Pronunciation

Additional Information
120 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$29.95

Quantity:
Buffalo Bird Girl: A Hidatsa Story
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3; 4; 5;

"I was born in an earth lodge by the mouth of the Knife River, in what is now North Dakota, three years after the smallpox winter." - Buffalo Bird Woman

Born in the 1830s, Buffalo Bird Girl was a member of the Hidatsa people, a Native American community that lived in permanent villages along the Missouri River on the Great Plains. Like other girls her age, Buffalo Bird Girl learned the ways of her people through watching, listening and then doing. She helped plant crops in the spring, tended the fields through the summer - scaring off birds and other animals, as well as hungry boys! - and in autumn joined in the harvest. She also learned to prepare animal skins, dry meat and perform other household duties. Along with her chores, however, there was time for playing games with friends or training her dog. Her family also visited the nearby trading post, where all sorts of magnificent things from the white man's settlements in the East could be seen.

Interweaving the actual words and stories of Buffalo Bird Woman with his artwork and archival photographs, award-winning author and artist S.D. Nelson has woven a poignant yet vibrant story, beautifully capturing the spirit of Buffalo Bird Girl and her lost way of life. The book includes a historical timeline.

Reviews
"The extraordinary illustration of this handsome volume begins with the endpaper maps and features acrylic paintings of the Hidatsa world reminiscent of traditional Plains Indian art. Pencil drawings and relevant, carefully labeled photographs round out the exquisite design. All the artwork both supports and adds to the text. An extensive author’s note and timeline supplement this beautiful tribute." —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"Nelson's quiet, respectful tone capably balances the factual details of daily life in the Hidatsa tribe with the obvious joy and nostalgia Buffalo Bird Girl feels toward her childhood." —The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"As a writer, storyteller, and traditional artist of the Sioux people, his perspective is genuine and effectively portrayed. This book would be enjoyable for anyone interested in history, but would also be an effective resource in the classroom to support the curriculum.”—Library Media Connection

"Nelson's acrylic paintings and b&w pencil drawings are intriguingly interlaced with the photographs, contrasting Native American figures in blunt profile with harvest colors and background textures that mimic dried spears of grass, leather skins, and basket weaves." — Publishers Weekly"

Educator Information
This fascinating picture book biography tells the childhood story of Buffalo Bird Woman. Through her true story, readers will learn what it was like to be part of this Native American community that lived along the Missouri River in the Dakotas, a society that depended more on agriculture for food and survival than on hunting. Children will relate to Buffalo Bird Girl’s routine of chores and playing with friends, and they will also be captivated by her lifestyle and the dangers that came with it.

Recommended Ages: 6-10

Additional Information
56 pages | 10.50" x 10.25"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$27.95

Quantity:
Buffalo Dreams
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Sioux; Lakota;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

The Bearpaw children learn of a white buffalo calf that is born on a ranch far from their home. The family leaves on a spontaneous pilgrimage in their camper to take gifts to the newborn. The children had grown up with the story of the White Buffalo Calf Woman, the powerful spirit who saved a starving tribe in ancient times, and had been reborn in the form of a white buffalo. But the white calf is protected by its large mother. What will happen to the children in the moonlight inside the corral?

A contemporary story that resonates with young readers of all backgrounds is based on an oral story passed down in the Bearpaw family. The White Buffalo Calf Woman, the powerful spirit who had saved a starving tribe in ancient times, had been reborn in the form of a white buffalo calf. Now that story seems to be coming true for the Bearpaw children.

The book includes the retelling of the original legend of the White Buffalo Calf Woman as well as step-by-step instructions with illustrations showing how to make your own dreamcatcher.

Additional Information
40 pages | 11.00" x 8.46"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$16.95

Quantity:
Bull Trout's Gift
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Kootenai; Salish;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

"We were wealthy from the water," Mitch Smallsalmon says, and like all the tribal elders, he speaks to our understanding of the natural world and the consequences of change. In this book the wisdom of the elders is passed on to the young as the story of the Jocko River, the home of the bull trout, unfolds for a group of schoolchildren on a field trip.

The Jocko River flows through the Flathead Indian Reservation in northwestern Montana. For thousands of years the Salish and Pend d’Oreille Indians lived along its banks, finding food and medicine in its plants and fish, and in the game hunted on its floodplain. Readers of this story will learn, along with the students of Ms. Howlett's class, about the history and culture of the river and its meaning in Native life, tradition, and religion. They will also discover the scientific background and social importance behind the Tribes' efforts to restore the bull trout to its home waters.

Beautifully illustrated and narrated in the tradition of the Salish and Kootenai Tribes, this account of conservation as the legacy of one generation to the next is about being good to the land that has been good to us. Bull Trout's Gift is steeped in the culture, history, and science that our children must know if they hope to transform past wisdom into future good.

Educator Information
Ages 8 - 12.

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$32.95

Quantity:
Sort By
Go To   of 10
>