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Aboriginal Measures for Economic Development
Format: Paperback
  • This volume explores Indigenous measures of economic development in First Nations Atlantic Canadian communities that are of relevance for First Nations peoples. Many of the challenges faced by these communities and their local, regional and national leaders in advancing economic development relate to experiences of diverse and complex issues — most of which clash with federal policies that increasingly call for centralization, standardization and uniformity. This volume illustrates the key challenges in establishing and maintaining socially responsible economic development that is beneficial for Aboriginal communities.

$24.95

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Arts of Engagement: Taking Aesthetic Action In and Beyond the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
Format: Paperback
  • Arts of Engagement focuses on the role that music, film, visual art, and Indigenous cultural practices play in and beyond Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools. Contributors here examine the impact of aesthetic and sensory experience in residential school history, at TRC national and community events, and in artwork and exhibitions not affiliated with the TRC. Using the framework of “aesthetic action,” the essays expand the frame of aesthetics to include visual, aural, and kinetic sensory experience, and question the ways in which key components of reconciliation such as apology and witnessing have social and political effects for residential school survivors, intergenerational survivors, and settler publics.

    This volume makes an important contribution to the discourse on reconciliation in Canada by examining how aesthetic and sensory interventions offer alternative forms of political action and healing. These forms of aesthetic action encompass both sensory appeals to empathize and invitations to join together in alliance and new relationships as well as refusals to follow the normative scripts of reconciliation. Such refusals are important in their assertion of new terms for conciliation, terms that resist the imperatives of reconciliation as a form of resolution.

    This collection charts new ground by detailing the aesthetic grammars of reconciliation and conciliation. The authors document the efficacies of the TRC for the various Indigenous and settler publics it has addressed, and consider the future aesthetic actions that must be taken in order to move beyond what many have identified as the TRC’s political limitations.

    Educator Information
    This book would be useful for Art, Art & Politics, Social Science, and Indigenous Studies courses.

    Additional Information
    382 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" | 24 colour illustrations, 2 printed music items

    Edited by Dylan Robinson and Keavy Martin

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$39.99

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Breaking Boundaries: LGBTQ2 Writers on Coming Out and Into Canada
Format: Paperback
  • An anthology of stories and poetry written by Canadian LGBTQ2 authors who are immigrants, refugees, or Canada-born.

    “What does it mean to be LGBTQ2 in Canada? The only possible answer to that question is one given in many voices. That is exactly what this book offers. There is struggle in these stories and poems, but there is also strength and resilience, compassion and determination. Woven together these voices leave me with a sense of hopefulness: a belief that the creativity and fierce commitment of our community will carry us forward as we work to create a Canada that lives up to the dream of freedom and safety it represents to so many people around the world.” — Robin Stevenson, author of Pride: Celebrating Diversity and Community

    Review
    The anthology pieces are diverse with authors who identify as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and 2-Spirited. It also includes stunning artwork by LGBTQ artists and allies. — Rainbow Refugee Society

    Authors & Artists
    Authors in this anthology include Teryl Berg, Kyle Chen, Wendy Judith Cutler, Corrie Hope Furst, Kevin Henry, Anne Hofland, Chantal Hughes, Masaki Kidokoro, Dale Lee Kwong, Austin Lee, JL Lori, Eka Nasution (narrator), Adam Nixon, Rainer Oktovianus (narrator), Gail Marlene Schwartz, Caelan Sinclair, LS Stone, Sosania Tomlinson, E.T. Turner, and Hayley Zacks.

    Artwork by Joni Danielson, Wokie Clark Fraser, Austin Lee, Trinity Lindenau, and Rainer Oktovianus.

    Additional Information
    146 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"
    Edited by Lori Shwydky

    This book contains memoirs, stories, poems, and artwork, which is why it appears in a variety of categories, such as both Fiction and Non-fiction, on our website.

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$13.95

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Claiming Anishinaabe: Decolonizing the Human Spirit
Author: Lynn Gehl
Traditional Territory: Anishinaabeg
Format: Paperback
  • Denied her Indigenous status, Lynn Gehl has been fighting her entire life to reclaim mino-pimadiziwin--the good life. Exploring Anishinaabeg philosophy and Anishinaabeg conceptions of truth, Gehl shows how she came to locate her spirit and decolonize her identity, thereby becoming, in her words, "fully human." Gehl also provides a harsh critique of Canada and takes on important anti-colonial battles, including sex discrimination in the Indian Act and the destruction of sacred places.

    Reviews
    Gehl is at the cutting edge with her concepts and ideas... She is on a journey and documents it well.
    Lorelei Anne Lambert, author of Research for Indigenous Survival

    Clear, insightful, and desperately needed...
    Lorraine F. Mayer, author of Cries from a Métis Heart

    The discussion of the heart and mind knowledge, as well as the discussion on the Anishinaabeg Clan System of Governance, [are] major contributions to the research.
    Marlyn Bennett, co-editor of Pushing the Margins

    "Throughout Claiming Anishinaabe, the conversation remains rooted in the destructive effects of oppressive power on the human spirit, and an insistence that both knowledge and spirituality are key in reclaiming one’s sense of self."
    Quill & Quire

    Educator Information
    This book would be useful for the following subject areas or courses: Indigenous Studies, Canadian History (Post-Confederation), Social Science, Autobiography/Biography Studies, Spirituality, and Law.

    Additional Information
    176 pages | 5.50" x 8.50" | Includes line drawings

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$24.95

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Daughters Are Forever
Author: Lee Maracle
Traditional Territory: Salish, Sto:lo
Format: Paperback
  • This powerful novel about a woman's self-discovery reinforces Lee Maracle's stature as one of the most important First Nations writers in North America. The novel incorporates an innovative structure - one based on Salish Nation storytelling - to depict the transformation of Marilyn, a First Nations woman who is alienated from her culture, her family, and herself. By discovering her own culture's ways and listening to the natural world, Marilyn begins to heal her deep-rooted hurt and gradually becomes reconciled with her estranged daughters. Here is a moving work about First Nations people in the modern world, and the importance of courage, truth, and reconciliation.

    Additional Information
    206 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$19.95

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Deaf Heaven
Traditional Territory: Secwepemc
Format: Paperback
  • Poetry that takes us inside present-day First Nations reality to reveal the wounds of history and the possible healing to come.

    As the title suggests, this new collection of poetry from Garry Gottfriedson of the Secwepemc (Shuswap) Nation deals with the ways in which the world is deaf to the problems First Nations people face in Canada today.

    Follow Garry Gottfriedson in this new collection of combative poems as he compels us and Heaven to listen to the challenges facing First Nation communities today. Employing many of the Secwepemc (Shuswap) images and stories, Gottfriedson takes us inside the rez and into the rooming houses in the city cores, but always drawing new strength from the land and the people who have moved upon it. He speaks of “the smell of grandmothers and grandfathers / breathing the stories into our blood” so as to “wrap our newborn in freshly made Star Quilts.”

    Gottfriedson examines such issues as the Truth and Reconciliation movements as well as the missing and murdered Aboriginal women. The poems focus not only on postcolonial issues but also on First Nations internal problems. Although the book speaks of age-old themes, it explores them through fresh modern eyes offering thought-provoking and engaging prespectives. Eloquent and witty, these poems are power-packed with imagery that uncovers the raw politics of race. There is nothing polite about them. While frequently offering a bleak view of present-day First Nation conditions, the poems also provide a sense of optimism: "the hope/that the coldest day in winter/will promise serenity in spring."

    Reviews
    “Gottfriedson’s poetry is built to endure and it will remain with you long after this book is closed.” – Alexander MacLeod, author of Light Lifting, finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize

    “Garry Gottfriedson rides double, calling out the violence and corruption he’s seen, while reminding us that grounded strength comes from staying connected to grandmothers, grandfathers, horses, and the land.” – Rita Wong, author of Forage, winner of the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize

    “Gottfriedson writes us the sound of his blood, the splatter of ink on wood, and the dripping sweat and tears of prayer — all of it telling us who we are and chanting, as if in chorus, ‘survival is brilliant.’ Will we be wise or strong enough to listen?” – Shane Rhodes, author of X: Poems & Anti-Poems

    Educator Information
    This book of poetry would be useful for Indigenous Studies courses or literature courses such as Indigenous Literatures, Canadian Literature, and Creative Writing.

    Additional Information
    100 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$15.95

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Ensouling Our Schools: A Universally Designed Framework for Mental Health, Well-Being, and Reconciliation
Format: Paperback
  • In an educational milieu in which standards and accountability hold sway, schools can become places of stress, marginalization, and isolation instead of learning communities that nurture a sense of meaning and purpose. In Ensouling Our Schools, author Jennifer Katz weaves together methods of creating schools that engender mental, spiritual, and emotional health while developing intellectual thought and critical analysis.

    Kevin Lamoureux contributes his expertise regarding Indigenous approaches to mental and spiritual health that benefit all students and address the TRC Calls to Action.

    Grade: For all teachers

    Additional Information
    200 pages | 8.00" x 10.50"

    by Jennifer Katz | with Kevin Lamoureux | foreword by Ry Moran

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$40.00

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Indians Wear Red
Format: Paperback
  • With the advent of Aboriginal street gangs such as Indian Posse, Manitoba Warriors, and Native Syndicate, Winnipeg garnered a reputation as the “gang capital of Canada.” Yet beyond the stereotypes of outsiders, little is known about these street gangs and the factors and conditions that have produced them. “Indians Wear Red” locates Aboriginal street gangs in the context of the racialized poverty that has become entrenched in the colonized space of Winnipeg’s North End. Drawing upon extensive interviews with Aboriginal street gang members as well as with Aboriginal women and elders, the authors develop an understanding from “inside” the inner city and through the voices of Aboriginal people — especially street gang members themselves.

    While economic restructuring and neo-liberal state responses can account for the global proliferation of street gangs, the authors argue that colonialism is a crucial factor in the Canadian context, particularly in western Canadian urban centres. Young Aboriginal people have resisted their social and economic exclusion by acting collectively as “Indians.” But just as colonialism is destructive, so too are street gang activities, including the illegal trade in drugs. Solutions lie not in “quick fixes” or “getting tough on crime” but in decolonization: re-connecting Aboriginal people with their cultures and building communities in which they can safely live and work.

$19.95

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Indigenous Business in Canada: Principles and Practices
Format: Paperback
  • Students who study business in university are not likely to hear about or discuss examples of Indigenous business successes from across the country. Rarely would one see references to Aboriginal communities, let alone examples of them growing multi-million dollar businesses and partnering to lead innovative economic development projects that positively impact the national economy. Resources are scarce and inadequate, an oversight that is to our detriment.

    Somewhere between a textbook and a book of collected essays, this collection of articles is an effort to build on and share the research of Aboriginal practitioners and scholars working in their respective fields. Where possible we share not only concepts, but also the voices of Aboriginal leaders, officials, Elders and other members of Aboriginal communities.

    Indigenous Business in Canada addresses contemporary concerns and issues in the doing of Indigenous business in Canada, reveals some of the challenges and diverse approaches to business in Aboriginal contexts from coast to coast to coast, and demonstrates the direct impact that history and policy, past and present, have on business and business education.

    Reviews
    Indigenous Business in Canada: Principles and Practices should serve as a conscious raiser for business education students and professionals working in housing, business, banking and other economic-development industries and support their ability to adapt to the growing importance of Aboriginal communities and business to the global economy.” -- Nelson & Waugh, Canadian Journal of Education, 2016

    Educator Information
    This textbook would be useful for courses in Business & Economics, Economic Development, Government & Business, and Indigenous Studies.

    Additional Information
    360 pages | 7.50" x 9.25"

    Edited by Keith G. Brown, Mary Beth Doucette, and Janice Esther Tulk.

Authentic Canadian Content
$27.95

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Indigenous Integration: 101+ Lesson Ideas for Secondary and College Teachers
Format: Paperback
  • The Truth and Reconciliation Commission challenges all Canadian educators to Integrate Indigenous content and ways of knowing into the curriculum. This research-based book for secondary teachers responds to these challenges by including aligned pedagogical practices and content. The easy to read discussion, extensive links to resources and practical, ready-to-use applications will not only help secondary teachers meet this curricular challenge but enjoy deeper connections with their students.

    What is your next step in Indigenizing your practice as a teacher? Is it reaching out to local Indigenous communities and starting a dialogue that privileges place-based education; the stories and history of the area? Is it noticing the problems in community such as disparities, injustices and facilitating inquiry-based learning to respond to them? Is it acknowledging the role of intergenerational trauma and engaging appropriate processes such as Circles to encourage deep and respectful listening and give voice to each student? Is it revising your history lesson so as not to over-generalize the diversity of First Nations and Metis in Canada? It certainly means having the courage to do something and step into the messiness of the challenge knowing we do not have the answers and may be unsure of the way forward.

    Additional Information
    116 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$27.68

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Indigenous Men and Masculinities: Legacies, Indentities, Regeneration
Format: Paperback
  • What do we know of masculinities in non-patriarchal societies? Indigenous peoples of the Americas and beyond come from traditions of gender equity, complementarity, and the sacred feminine, concepts that were unimaginable and shocking to Euro-western peoples at contact. "Indigenous Men and Masculinities", edited by Kim Anderson and Robert Alexander Innes, brings together prominent thinkers to explore the meaning of masculinities and being a man within such traditions, further examining the colonial disruption and imposition of patriarchy on Indigenous men.

    Building on Indigenous knowledge systems, Indigenous feminism, and queer theory, the sixteen essays by scholars and activists from Canada, the U.S., and New Zealand open pathways for the nascent field of Indigenous masculinities. The authors explore subjects of representation through art and literature, as well as Indigenous masculinities in sport, prisons, and gangs.

    "Indigenous Men and Masculinities" highlights voices of Indigenous male writers, traditional knowledge keepers, ex-gang members, war veterans, fathers, youth, two-spirited people, and Indigenous men working to end violence against women. It offers a refreshing vision toward equitable societies that celebrate healthy and diverse masculinities.

$27.95

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Indigenous Poetics in Canada
Format: Paperback
  • Indigenous Poetics in Canada broadens the way in which Indigenous poetry is examined, studied, and discussed in Canada. Breaking from the parameters of traditional English literature studies, this volume embraces a wider sense of poetics, including Indigenous oralities, languages, and understandings of place.

    Featuring work by academics and poets, the book examines four elements of Indigenous poetics. First, it explores the poetics of memory: collective memory, the persistence of Indigenous poetic consciousness, and the relationships that enable the Indigenous storytelling process. The book then explores the poetics of performance: Indigenous poetics exist both in written form and in relation to an audience. Third, in an examination of the poetics of place and space, the book considers contemporary Indigenous poetry and classical Indigenous narratives. Finally, in a section on the poetics of medicine, contributors articulate the healing and restorative power of Indigenous poetry and narratives.

    Awards
    2014 ACQL Gabrielle Roy Prize for Literary Criticism winner.

    Reviews
    Indigenous Poetics in Canada is that rare book of scholarship that speaks to the heart and spirit as well as the mind. The selections in this collection offer powerful individual and collective insight into the ways that diverse traditions of Indigenous poetics animate our imaginative possibilities and extend our cultural understandings across time, space, and difference. To study Indigenous poetics is to be forcefully reminded of both our historical traditions and their continuing significance, and the poets, writers, scholars, and story-makers featured in this volume are among the most eloquent and insightful voices on the topic today. This is a transformative intervention in Indigenous literary studies as well as the broader canon of Canadian literature, reminding us that questions of aesthetics are always in dynamic relationship with the lived experience of our politicized imaginations in the world.'
    Daniel Heath Justice (Cherokee Nation), April 2014

    Conversations about Indigenous literatures will be forever enriched by this stunning new collection. Here, the leading voices in Indigenous literary studies draw upon deep currents of inspiration—both ancient and contemporary—as they reflect upon and powerfully perform the act of re-making the world through language. Joyful, humbling, and wonderfully diverse, Indigenous Poetics in Canada welcomes readers and writers into a re-indigenized rhetorical landscape-and I cannot wait to see what takes place there.'
    Keavy Martin, April 2014

    In a fine introduction, McLeod does an admirable job of framing the essays and interviews to come while giving readers less familiar with indigenous poetics insight into some of the tropes and rhetorical strategies practitioners use, including kiskino (‘things...pointed to, but never completely articulated’), kakêskihkêmowina
    (‘counselling narratives’), and aniskwâcimopicikêwin (‘the process of connecting stories together’). That this collection exists is at once a challenge to the white publishing world that has long refused to recognize indigenous poetic practices as ‘poetry’ and a testament to the health and vibrancy of the living word of indigenous consciousness.... Summing up: Highly recommended.
    B. Carson, Choice, December 2014, December 2014

    Educator Information
    This book would be useful for the following subject areas or courses: Indigenous Studies, Poetry, Canadian Literature, and Literary Criticism.

    Additional Information
    416 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

    Edited by Neal McLeod.

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$36.99

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Keeping the Land
Format: Paperback
  • When the Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug’s traditional territory was threatened by mining exploration in 2006, they followed their traditional duty to protect the land and asked the mining exploration company, Platinex, to leave. Platinex left — and then sued the remote First Nation for $10 billion. The ensuing legal dispute lasted two years and eventually resulted in the jailing of community leaders. Ariss argues that though this jailing was extraordinarily punitive and is indicative of continuing colonialism within the legal system, some aspects of the case demonstrate the potential of Canadian law to understand, include and reflect Aboriginal perspectives. Connecting scholarship in Aboriginal rights and Canadian law, traditional Aboriginal law, social change and community activism, Keeping the Land explores the twists and turns of this legal dispute in order to gain a deeper understanding of the law’s contributions to and detractions from the process of reconciliation.

$22.95

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Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun: Unceded Territories
Format: Hardcover
  • The major retrospective of one of Canada's most important and original contemporary artists.

    Unceded Territories is a major and timely review of the work of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, spanning thirty years of his painterly and polemical practice. It places the artist’s concerns in dialogue with this moment in our shared histories. An artist of Cowichan and Okanagan descent, Yuxweluptun lives and works on unceded Coast Salish territories in Vancouver, British Columbia. He calls himself a history painter, a monumentalist, a modernist. Impassioned in his commitment to advance First Nations rights to the land and effect change, Yuxweluptun fuses art with political action – he “paints freedom and equality”.

    This retrospective includes brilliant commentary from Michael Turner, Lucy Lippard, Marcia Crosby, Glenn Alteen, a short-story by Jimmie Durham. In an extensive dialogue, curators Karen Duffek and Tania Willard discuss the meaning of Yuxweluptun’s practice and place it in the context of the First Nations struggle for autonomy, justice, and environmental preservation. In a searing and powerful artist’s statement, Yuxweluptun himself explains the essence of his painting and the forces that drive his artistic and political life.

    Published to accompany the exhibition at the University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology this volume includes 65 of Yuxweluptun’s paintings from the last three decades and will be a lasting document of his art and activism.

    Additional Information
    180 pages | 10.53" x 12.35" | 80 illustrations

Authentic Canadian Content
$45.00

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Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures
Traditional Territory: Various
Format: Paperback
  • This is a collection of classic and newly commissioned essays about the study of Indigenous literatures in North America. The contributing scholars include some of the most venerable Indigenous theorists, among them Gerald Vizenor (Anishinaabe), Jeannette Armstrong (Okanagan), Craig Womack (Creek), Kimberley Blaeser (Anishinaabe), Emma LaRocque (Métis), Daniel Heath Justice (Cherokee), Janice Acoose (Saulteaux), and Jo-Ann Episkenew (Métis). Also included are settler scholars foundational to the field, including Helen Hoy, Margery Fee, and Renate Eigenbrod. Among the newer voices are both settler and Indigenous theorists such as Sam McKegney, Keavy Martin, and Niigaanwewidam Sinclair.

    The volume is organized into five subject areas: Position, the necessity of considering where you come from and who you are; Imagining Beyond Images and Myths, a history and critique of circulating images of Indigenousness; Debating Indigenous Literary Approaches; Contemporary Concerns, a consideration of relevant issues; and finally Classroom Considerations, pedagogical concerns particular to the field. Each section is introduced by an essay that orients the reader and provides ideological context. While anthologies of literary criticism have focused on specific issues related to this burgeoning field, this volume is the first to offer comprehensive perspectives on the subject.

    Educator Information
    This anthology would be useful for the following subject areas or courses: Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Literature, Social Science, Education, and Literary Criticism.

    Product Information
    485 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

    Edited by Deanna Reder and Linda M. Morra.

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$48.99

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