Shopping Basket Shopping Basket      Sign Up / Sign In     
ONLINE SALES: 250.758.4287  or  Toll Free 1.888.278.2202
Not using our site? Send orders and questions to: contact@strongnations.com
RETAIL STORE: 250.585.1549

First Nations

16 - 30 of 126 Results
Sort By
Go To   of 9
>
>
Environmentalists from our First Nations
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8;

Like the other books in the First Nations Series for Young Readers, this books offers ten short and engaging biographies of First Nations/Native activists who advocate not only for the environment but for Native rights. Their stories are full of highs and lows, triumphs and setbacks. Environmental trailblazers, these men and women are role models for children everywhere.

The men and women profiled here are united by their work to protect the environment and to support indigenous rights. Their stories take us from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska to the Black Mesa in Arizona.

Melina Laboucan-Massimo uses her passion to stop oil extraction in Alberta’s tar sands.
Winona LaDuke is a voice for reclaiming Native lands, advocating renewable energy resources, and protecting Native cultures.
Clayton Thomas-Muller is a dynamic advocate for indigenous self-determination and campaigner against tar sands extraction.
Ben Powless brings his youthful energy and skills to addressing climate change issues.
Tom Goldtooth protects sacred sites and organizes global direct-action campaigns for the environment.
Grace Thorpe is a grandmother who dedicated her retirement years to keeping Native reservations from becoming nuclear waste dumps.
Sarah James is a voice from northern Alaska defending the Porcupine caribou herd and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
Enei Begaye & Evon Peter are married activists who work as a team on environmental issues and sustainable strategies for Native people.
Klee Benally uses the media to empower Native communities in their fight for environmental justice.
Teague Allston works to ensure a tribal voice is heard in Washington DC.

Reviews
"These short biographies of environmentalists are sure to engage a whole classroom of readers. From the focus on a particular environmental crisis, to a description of each person's native heritage, to the writing style and level, the stories are accessible to readers young and old."— Canadian Teacher Magazine, March 2012

Series Information
This book is part of the First Nations Series for Young Readers. Each book is a collection of ten biographies of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit women and men who are leaders in their fields of work, in their art, and in their communities. For ages 9-13.

Additional Information
128 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$10.95

Quantity:
First Nations Ceremonies
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

Written from an Anishinaabe perspective, First Nations Ceremonies explores various Anishinaabe teachings that have been handed down from Elders, encouraging mino-pimaatisiwin, the good life. These practices are still used today, crossing time from the past to the future.


Addtional Information
24 pages
Authentic Canadian Content
$4.95

Quantity:
First Nations Technology
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2;

In this story, First Nations technology of the past is contrasted with First Nations technology of the present. Many illustrations show how inventive First Nations people were in their use of the environment. The addition of present-day technology shows how adaptive First Nations people continue to be. Housing, fishing, hunting, gathering, storing, clothing, carrying, transportation, cooking and ceremony are included.

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.50

Quantity:
From Time Immemorial: The First Peoples of the Northwest Coast
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8;

From Time Immemorial provides an honest and up-to-date survey of the history of the coastal First Nations from pre-contact to the present. The culture of the coastal people was highly complex. Although there were many similarities, there were also many differences among the groups who shared the wealth of their life-sustaining environment.

This book provides a broad overview of traditional ways common to a large number of diverse groups. It encourages readers to learn more about particular groups who, long ago, walked the shorelines and forest trails of the Pacific Northwest.

Educator Information
From Time Immemorial has been recommended by the First Nations Education Steering Committee of BC as an “authentic First Peoples text that meets provincial standards and reflects First Peoples knowledge and perspectives in a respective way.

It has also been recommended by Literacy BC: “It’s easy to see why this text, which is accessible for fundamental level students, was also awarded the British Columbia 2000 Book Award.” Jan Weiten notes, “[This] is such an ambitious project. Both Diane and Joe Silvey have honoured the spirit and history of First Nations people, and they should be proud of themselves. This is definitely an asset to any classroom.

From Time Immemorial meets or exceeds all of the Learning Standards for the new BC Grade 3 Social Studies curriculum and the First Nations content for grades 4-8: 

  • Learning about indigenous peoples nurtures multicultural awareness and respect for diversity
  • People from diverse cultures and societies share some common experiences and aspects of life.
  • Indigenous knowledge is passed down through oral history, traditions, and collective memory.
  • Indigenous societies throughout the world value the well-being of the self, the land, spirits, and ancestors.

Recommended Grades: 3-8.

A teacher's guide for this book is also available: https://www.strongnations.com/store/item_display.php?i=141

Additional Information
92 pages | colour illustrations, photos, and maps 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$24.95

Quantity:
Gaawin Gindaaswin Ndaawsii / I Am Not A Number
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

Dual language edition of powerful children's book about residential school experience reflects Indigenous language revitalization.

The dual language edition, in Nishnaabemwin (Ojibwe) Nbisiing dialect and English, of the award-winning I Am Not a Number. When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from, despite the efforts of the nuns who are in charge at the school and who tell her that she is not to use her own name but instead use the number they have assigned to her. When she goes home for summer holidays, Irene's parents decide never to send her and her brothers away again. But where will they hide? And what will happen when her parents disobey the law? Based on the life of co-author Jenny Kay Dupuis’ grandmother, I Am Not a Number is a hugely necessary book that brings a terrible part of Canada’s history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to.

Reviews
"Residential and boarding school stories are hard to read, but they're vitally important... books like I Am Not a Number should be taught in schools in Canada, and the U.S., too."— Debbie Reese, American Indians in Children's Literature

"It’s important to teach children about true Canadian history, but it’s not easy to talk about it in a way that children will understand. I Am Not a Number is perfect to get the conversation about residential schools started with your children. It opens the door for them to ask questions about the subject and the story is relatable in a way they can follow."— Residential School Magazine

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 7-11
Guided Reading: V

Dual-language: Nishnaabemwin (Ojibwe) Nbisiing dialect and English.

Subjects: Character Education (Empathy, Prejudice & Tolerance); History & Social Studies (Canadian History, First Nations & Indigenous Peoples); Government & Citizenship; Reflecting Diversity

Additional Information
44 pages | 8.50" x 11.00" | Translated by Muriel Sawyer and Geraldine McLeod with contributions by Tory Fisher

 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$14.95

Quantity:
Ghost Dance
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Paiute (Piute);
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

When the bountiful world of their ancestors was no more, the Paiute prophets had visions of a dance that would restore it. The ghost dance movement began in the U.S. in the 1800s, in hope as native peoples came together to dance for their shared dream. The dream failed and they tried again. Again the dream failed tragically. But the vision and the dream still call out to all people, envisioning a future when all Indian peoples would be united, disease would vanish, and the earth would be regenerated and restored. 

Reviews
"McLerran's elegant, spare text begins by describing the result of white settlers' relentless westward movement in the U.S... [Paiute visionaries] dreamed that if Native peoples danced, the white people would disappear and the ghosts of the wildlife that had been decimated would return... [Attempts at coming together in a sacred, non-violent ceremony ended in violence to the Native Americans, as their actions were interpreted as warlike.] McLerran encourages readers to hold on to the vision of the Dance, and to unite across the boundaries of culture and politics that we have created, to heal the world... [Morin's] evocative paintings... glow with the golden colors of the sun-drenched prairie, and exhibit a dramatic use of light... This stunning book will hold great appeal for environmentally conscious readers." - School Library Journal

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$14.95

Quantity:
Giving Thanks: A Native American Good Morning Message
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

For as long as anyone can remember, Mohawk parents have taught their children to start each day by giving thanks to Mother Earth. Also known as the Thanksgiving Address, this good morning message is based on the belief that the natural world is a precious and rare gift. The whole universe — from the highest stars to the tiniest blade of grass — is addressed as one great family.

Now readers of all ages can share in this tribute to the environment, adapted especially for children by Chief Jake Swamp, whose efforts to share this vision of thanksgiving take him all over the world. Chief Swamp's inspirational message, along with Erwin Printup, Jr.'s unforgettable landscapes, make Giving Thanks a timeless celebration of the spirit of nature.

Additional Information
24 pages | 7.46" x 11.01"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$14.95

Quantity:
Grandma's Special Feeling
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4;

Whenever Grandma gets that “special feeling,” the children know they're about to pile into the van, “get out into nature,” and get a lesson about how First Nations peoples used to live in the old days; and Grandma knows that the children need to be able to experience what she wants to talk to them about. As she passes on this knowledge to the children, she also passes on cultural history about how respect was and continues to be shown to the plants—how they are acknowledged for their contributions and assured they will not be over-harvested.

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.50

Quantity:
Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 4;

Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump in Alberta is one of the oldest, largest, and best-preserved buffalo jump sites in North America and was declared a World Heritage Site in 1981. Author Gordon Reid has compiled a history of this significant site, describing the importance of the buffalo to Native peoples, how the jump was used, and the traditions and skills surrounding the hunt. He also looks at the excavation of the site, explaining how archaeologists uncovered artifacts, and what they learned about the history of the site and the people who used it. Also included is an overview of the resources offered by the Head Smashed-In Buffalo Jump interpretive centre.

This book, originally published in 1993, has been a very popular resource for tourists, educators, students, and people interested in Alberta's heritage. Completely updated and redesigned for this new edition, it will be the only book available that explains, in depth, the vital role of Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump in Native history.

Additional Information
48 pages | 8.00" x 8.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
How the Cougar Came to be Called the Ghost Cat
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq;
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3;

The story of Ajig the cougar, who is trapped between two worlds, A symbol of the assimilation of First Nations through enforced Western education systems.

The human need to belong is very powerful, so much so that we often sacrifice parts of who we are in order to be accepted. This is the tale of a young cougar, Ajig, who makes this sacrifice – and pays dearly. A curious and adventurous cougar, Ajig decides to build a new home in a strange forest. When he finds that all of the animals in the forest are afraid of him, Ajig agrees to stop behaving like a cougar so that he can make friends. But when Ajig tries to return to his birthplace, he learns that he is no longer welcome. Lost between two worlds, the young cougar becomes a “ghost cat.”

This beautifully illustrated book, written in both Mi’kmaw and English, reflects the experiences of First Nations peoples’ assimilation into the Euro-Canadian school system, but speaks to everyone who is marginalized or at risk.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$12.95

Quantity:
How We Saw the World: Nine Native Stories of the Way Things Began
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4;

All peoples have their own stories of how the Earth was created, what separated the land from the seas, and how the many animals, fish, and other creatures came to have their particular characteristics. The native tribes of North America are no different: they too have stories about the “way things began.” A fascinating collection of tales that explain the origins of tornadoes, forest fires, butterflies, horses, Niagara Falls, why dogs are our best friends, and even a very funny story of why owls and rabbits look the way they do.

Reviews
“Taylor tells the tale with straightforward ease: her paintings, exquisitely evocative of their primeval setting.” –Kirkus Reviews

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.54" x 11.27"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$9.99

Quantity:
I Am Not a Number
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from, despite the efforts of the nuns who are in charge at the school and who tell her that she is not to use her own name but instead use the number they have assigned to her. When she goes home for summer holidays, Irene's parents decide never to send her and her brothers away again. But where will they hide? And what will happen when her parents disobey the law? Based on the life of co-author Jenny Kay Dupuis’ grandmother, I Am Not a Number is a hugely necessary book that brings a terrible part of Canada’s history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to.

Awards

  • 2018 Red Cedar Award for Information Book Winner
  • 2018 Hackmatack Award Winner

Reviews
"Residential and boarding school stories are hard to read, but they're vitally important... books like I Am Not a Number should be taught in schools in Canada, and the U.S., too."— Debbie Reese, American Indians in Children's Literature

"It’s important to teach children about true Canadian history, but it’s not easy to talk about it in a way that children will understand. I Am Not a Number is perfect to get the conversation about residential schools started with your children. It opens the door for them to ask questions about the subject and the story is relatable in a way they can follow."— Residential School Magazine

"[A] powerful teaching tool that brings a terrible part of Canada’s history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to. It is written in simple language and told in a way that will stimulate conversations about residential schools and the traumatic effects they have had on generations of First Nation families and communities. ... beautifully illustrated by Gillian Newland. She captures the somber mood of the school, the anguish of the children, the severity of the nuns and the desperation of the family. Students can easily empathize with Irene and her brothers as well as their parents as they try to imagine how they would feel or act in a similar situation." — Alberta Native News, December 2016

"Endless cross-curricular connections can be made using this story. But the most powerful aspect of this book is that it will open a dialogue, one that Justice Murray Sinclair spoke of as head of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, a dialogue that needs to take place for reconciliation to happen." — ETFO Voice

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 7-11
Guided Reading: V

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$18.95

Quantity:
I Lost My Talk
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4;

I lost my talk
The talk you took away
When I was a little girl
At Shubenacadie school.

One of Rita Joe's most influential poems, "I Lost My Talk" tells the revered Mi'kmaw Elder's childhood story of losing her language while a resident of the residential school in Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia. An often quoted piece in this era of truth and reconciliation, Joe's powerful words explore and celebrate the survival of Mi'kmaw culture and language despite its attempted eradication.

A companion book to the simultaneously published I'm Finding My Talk by Rebecca Thomas, I Lost My Talk is a necessary reminder of a dark chapter in Canada's history, a powerful reading experience, and an effective teaching tool for young readers of all cultures and backgrounds. Includes a biography of Rita Joe and striking colour illustrations by Mi'kmaw artist Pauline Young.

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 4 to 9.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$22.95

Quantity:
I'm Finding My Talk
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4;

I'm finding my talk
And it may take some time,
But I'm learning to speak
In a language that's mine.

A response to Rita Joe's iconic poem "I Lost My Talk," and published simultaneously with the new children's book edition illustrated by Pauline Young, comes a companion picture book by award-winning spoken-word artist and Mi'kmaw activist Rebecca Thomas. A second-generation residential school survivor, Thomas writes this response poem openly and honestly, reflecting on the process of working through the destructive effects of colonialism.

From sewing regalia to dancing at powow to learning traditional language, I'm Finding My Talk is about rediscovering her community, and finding culture. Features stunning, vibrant illustrations by Mi'kmaw artist Pauline Young.

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 4 to 9.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$22.95

Quantity:
Indigenous Dwellings of Canada: A Colouring Book
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5;

Get ready to have fun and learn at the same time! Explore the many different homes and cultures of Turtle Island’s nations, past and present, throughout Indigenous Dwellings of Canada.

Each beautiful, black-line illustration includes carefully researched commentaries by Katherine and Leo Pettipas. Not only do they tell fun stories, but offer informative glimpses into Canadian history.

This educational colouring book is full of images and tales that will delight students and artists of all ages.

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$4.95

Quantity:
Sort By
Go To   of 9
>
>