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Indigenous Peoples of Australia

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Becoming Our Future: Global Indigenous Curatorial Practice
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

This book investigates international Indigenous methodologies in curatorial practice from the geographic spaces of Canada, Aotearoa (New Zealand) and Australia. From a perspective of Indigenous peoples important place within society, this collection explores how Indigenous art and culture operate within and from a structural framework that is unique and is positioned outside of the non-Indigenous cultural milieu.

Through a selection of contributions, Becoming Our Future articulates this perspective, defines Indigenous curatorial practice and celebrates Indigenous sovereignty within the three countries. It begins to explore the connections and historical moments that draw Indigenous curatorial practices together and the differences that set them apart. This knowledge is grounded in continuous international exchanges and draws on the breadth of work within the field. Contributors include Nigel Borell, Nici Cumpston, Freya Carmicheal, Karl Chitham, Franchesca Cubillo, Léuli Eshraghi, Reuben Friend, Heather Igloliorte, Jaimie Isaac, Carly Lane, Michelle LaVallee, Cathy Mattes, Bruce McLean, Lisa Myers, Julie Nagam, Jolene Rickard, Megan Tamati-Quennell, and Daina Warren.

Educator Information
Becoming our Future: Global Indigenous Curatorial Practice is a co-publication based on the three-year Tri-Nations International Indigenous Curators' Exchange, and was a joint initiative between the Australia Council for the Arts, Canada Council for the Arts and Creative New Zealand. It features artists and the curatorial perspectives of Indigenous curators from Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

Additional Information
228 pages | 6.25" x 9.25"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$35.00

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Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Australian;

This extraordinary story of courage and faith is based on the actual experiences of three girls who fled from the repressive life of Moore River Native Settlement, following along the rabbit-proof fence back to their homelands. Assimilationist policy dictated that these girls be taken from their kin and their homes in order to be made white. Settlement life was unbearable with its chains and padlocks, barred windows, hard cold beds, and horrible food. Solitary confinement was doled out as regular punishment. The girls were not even allowed to speak their language. Of all the journeys made since white people set foot on Australian soil, the journey made by these girls born of Aboriginal mothers and white fathers speaks something to everyone.

Educator Information
Grades 11-12 English First Peoples Resource.

Additional Information
160 pages | 5.00" x 7.75"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

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Indivisible: Indigenous Human Rights
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Indigenous rights are generally conceptualized and advocated separately from the human rights framework. The contributors to Indivisible: Indigenous Human Rights, however, deftly and powerfully argue that Indigenous rights are in fact human rights and that the fundamental human rights of Indigenous people cannot be protected without the inclusion of their Indigenous rights, which are suppressed and oppressed by the forces of racism and colonialism. Drawing on a wealth of experience and blending critical theoretical frameworks and a close knowledge of domestic and international law on human rights, the authors in this collection show that settler states such as Canada persist in violating and failing to acknowledge Indigenous human rights. Furthermore, settler states are obligated to respect and animate these rights, despite the evident tensions in political and economic interests between elite capitalists, settler citizens and Indigenous peoples.

Reviews
“The historic and contemporary challenges faced by Indigenous peoples, be it the tragedy of residential schools, high levels of violence against women, abusive policing, struggles around land and resources, or entrenched poverty are reflective of the disgraceful failure of Canada and other states to uphold human rights. Indivisible is a critical call to governments and Indigenous peoples to take up the indivisible framework of rights protection enshrined in the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.” — Alex Neve, Amnesty International

“Well written, fast moving, and well researched, this is book is a rich, smart resource for anyone wanting to break down and understand the human rights versus indigenous rights debate, and to move on to more productive conversations about real political and legal change for indigenous peoples.” — Val Napoleon, University of Victoria

“Have you ever looked back at a point in your life when, had good advice been taken, it would have meant a much better future? This book offers that advice, now. Canadians who want to live well because Indigenous peoples prosper need to read Indivisible.” — Robert Lovelace, Retired Chief of Ardoch Algonquin First Nation, professor of global studies, Queen’s University

Educator Information

Table of Contents
Indigenous Human Rights are Indivisible (Joyce Green)

THEORETICAL AND POLITICAL CONTEXT FOR INDIGENOUS HUMAN RIGHTS
Denying Indigenous Human Rights: Colonialism and Rights Discourse in Canada (Joyce Green)
Two The Race Bind: Denying Aboriginal Rights in Australia (Maggie Walter)
Colonialism Past and Present: Indigenous Human Rights and Canadian Policing (Elizabeth Comack)
Indigenous Human Rights and Decolonization (Andrea Smith)

ABORIGINAL HUMAN RIGHTS — SPECIFIC THEMES
McIvor v. Canada: Legislated Patriarchy Meets Aboriginal Women’s Equality Rights (Gwen Brodsky)
Confronting Violence: Indigenous Women. Self-Determination and International Human Rights (Rauna Kuokkanen)
Victoria’s Secret: How to Make a Population of Prey (Mary Eberts)

INTERNATIONAL AND DOMESTIC CONSTITUTIONAL LAW and INDIGENOUS HUMAN RIGHTS
Free, Prior and Informed Consent: Defending Indigenous Rights in the Global Rush for Resources (Craig Benjamin)
The Presumption of Conformity: International Indigenous Human Rights and the Canadian Constitution (Brenda Gunn)
Undermining Indigenous Peoples’ Security and Human Rights (Paul Joffe)

Additional Information
240 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$34.00

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Making Space for Indigenous Feminism
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

The first edition of Making Space for Indigenous Feminism proposed that Indigenous feminism was a valid and indeed essential theoretical and activist position, and introduced a roster of important Indigenous feminist contributors. This new edition builds on the success and research of the first and provides updated and new chapters that cover a wide range of some of the most important issues facing Indigenous peoples today: violence against women, recovery of Indigenous self-determination, racism, misogyny and decolonization. Specifically, new chapters deal with Indigenous resurgence, feminism amongst the Sami and in Aboriginal Australia, neoliberal restructuring in Oaxaca, Canada’s settler racism and sexism, and missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada. 

Written by Indigenous feminists and allies, this book provides a powerful and original intellectual and political contribution demonstrating that feminism has much to offer Indigenous women, and all Indigenous peoples, in their struggles against oppression.

Reviews
Making Space for Indigenous Feminism is an essential resource that places gender justice at the core of our analyses of colonization and decolonization. What we learn is urgent: without addressing the systemic and symbolic character of the gendered violence that Indigenous women, girls, two-spirit, trans, and queer folks disproportionately face, decolonization will remain a man-made, colonial sham.”— Glen Coulthard, First Nations and Indigenous Studies, UBC

“This path-breaking collection brings together leading and emerging voices in the field, presenting critical innovative research that reminds us of the need for a consistent application of feminist analytic tools to understand colonialism and patriarchy as mutually constitutive and reinforcing forces. This collection is essential as an emancipatory tool for decolonization and Indigenous resurgence.”— Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, University of Victoria

Additional Information
256 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$35.00

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