Indigenous Peoples of the United States

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Baby Rattlesnake
Artists:
Mira Reisberg
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Native American; Pawnee;

A Native American (Pawnee) tale of family love and forgiveness.

Baby Rattlesnake wants a rattle like his older siblings have. His crying keeps the rattlesnake elders up all night so his parents give him a new rattle. Sure enough, he misuses his new rattle. When he tries to scare the chief's daughter, she steps on his rattle and crushes it. Sad and defeated, he returns to his forgiving family who give him "big rattlesnake hugs."

Educator Information
Guided Reading: K
Lexile: AD550L
Interest Level: Grades K - 3
Reading Level: Grades 3 - 3

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.25" x 11.25" | Told by Te Ata, Adapted by Lynn Moroney

Authentic Indigenous Text
$15.95

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Beaver Steals Fire: A Salish Coyote Story
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Salish;
A long time ago, fire belonged only to the animals in the land above, not to those on the earth below. Curlew, keeper of the sky world, guarded fire and kept it from the earth. Coyote, however, devised a clever plan to steal fire, aided by Grizzly Bear, Wren, Snake, Frog, Eagle, and Beaver. These brave and resourceful animal beings raided the land above and risked all to steal fire from Curlew.
 
Beaver Steals Fire is an ancient and powerful tale springing from the hearts and experiences of the Salish people of Montana. Steeped in the rich and culturally vital storytelling tradition of the tribe, this tale teaches both respect for fire and awareness of its significance, themes particularly relevant today.
 
This unforgettable version of the story is told by Salish elder Johnny Arlee and beautifully illustrated by tribal artist Sam Sandoval.
 
Reviews
"Beaver Steals Fire: A Salish Coyote Story is a picture book rendition of a story directly from the cultural tradition of the Salish people of Montana. Retold by Salish elder Johnny Arlee, and wonderfully illustrated in full color by tribal artist Sam Sandoval, Beaver Steals Fire recounts how the animals worked together to obtain fire and help prepare the world for inhabitation by human beings. Beaver Steals Fire is presented with the full support of The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal Division of Fire; a note to the reader at the beginning asks those who use Beaver Steals Fire in the classroom or others who read it aloud to orally tell or discuss the story only in winter, when snow is on the ground, as this is a strongly ingrained part of tribal seasonal tradition. A beautifully presented legend, highly recommended." — Children's Bookwatch, February 2006

Additional Information
64 pages | 7.50" x 10.00"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$22.50

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Berry Magic
Artists:
Teri Sloat
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Yupik;

Long ago, the only berries on the tundra were hard, tasteless, little crowberries. As Anana watches the ladies complain bitterly while picking berries for the Fall Festival, she decides to use her magic to help. "Atsa-ii-yaa (Berry), Atsa-ii-yaa (Berry), Atsaukina!" (Be a berry!), Anana sings under the full moon turning four dolls into little girls that run and tumble over the tundra creating patches of fat, juicy berries: blueberries, cranberries, salmonberries, and raspberries. The next morning Anana and the ladies fill basket after basket with berries for the Fall Festival. Thanks to Anana, there are plenty of tasty berries for the agutak (Eskimo tee cream) at the festival and forevermore. As she did with THE EYE OF THE NEEDLE (praised by the New York Times Book Review, a San Francisco Chronicle Choice, and a Maryland Black-Eyed Susan Picture Book Award winner), Yup'ik Eskimo elder Betty Huffmon shared this folktale with author/illustrator Teri Sloat, who brings it to life with her delightful illustrations.

Reviews
“Sloat collaborates with Huffmon, a Yup'ik storyteller, to infuse a traditional ‘origins’ tale with the joy of creating. Hearing the old women of her village grumble that they have only tasteless crowberries for the fall feast’s akutaq—described as ‘Eskimo ice cream,’ though the recipe at the end includes mixing in shredded fish and lard—young Anana carefully fashions three dolls, then signs and dances them to life. Away the bound, to cover the hills with cranberries, blueberries, and salmonberries. Sloat dresses her smiling figures in mixes of furs and brightly patterned garb, and sends them tumbling exuberantly through grassy tundra scenes as wildlife large and small gathers to look on. . . . Young readers will be captivated by the action, and by Anana’s infectious delight.”— Kirkus Reviews

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.32" x 9.90"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$16.95

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Coyote Places the Stars
Authors:
Harriet Peck Taylor
Artists:
Harriet Peck Taylor
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Native American; Wasco;

Based on a Wasco Native American legend, this dramatically illustrated pourquoi tale explains the designs of the constellations. It is the curious coyote who decides to discover the secrets of the heavens by creating a ladder of arrows he shoots into the sky. Once in the heavens, he moves the stars around forming the shapes of his animal friends, and he calls them all together to enjoy his handiwork.

The simple, quickly moving text is luminously illustrated with colorful border designs around some of the text as well as full-and double-page spreads of the constellations, Southwestern landscape, and animals, created by painting dyes on cotton fabric and detailing with the wax-resist batik method. This technique affords an effective white outline of important objects. The onomatopoetic language makes this a natural tale for classroom reading, but the artwork can be best appreciated by independent readers.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.75" x 9.00"

$9.99

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Cradle Me
Authors:
Debby Slier
Artists:
Marilyn Angel Wynn
Format: Board Book
Text Content Territories: Native American;

The rich Native American tradition of carrying babies safely, comfortably and close to their mothers in cradle boards endures to this day. Cradle Me celebrates Native American families and shows how they carry their babies and, with a fill-in-the-line feature, enbables readers to translate the words to write their own language.

Reviews
"In a book tailor-made for babies (who love looking at other babies), Slier introduces eleven infants from different Native American tribes, safely and (for the most part) happily secured in their cradleboards. Each picture is accompanied by a single word describing the baby’s actions or emotions. The culturally specific and the humanly universal are both depicted here." —Horn Book

 
Additional Information
32 pages | 11.00" x 8.50" | Boardbook
$10.95

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Dawn Flight: A Lakota Story
Artists:
Jessika Von Innerebner
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Lakota;

Long ago, when a great flood cleansed the land of unhappiness, the Grandfather sent Wanjblí the eagle to save one virtuous member of the human race and teach her how to live a good life. The eagle is a powerful symbol of courage, wisdom, and strength. In Kevin’s book he shares an inspiring vision of unity and hope for a new generation teaching children to recognize the eagle in themselves and others and always to soar above the darkness into the light.

Additional Information
40 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$16.99

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Gift Horse: A Lakota Story
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Lakota; Native American;

An action-packed coming-of-age story, Gift Horse is a wonderfully evocative introduction to 19th century Native American life on the Great Plains. When his father gives him a gift horse, marking the beginning of his journey to manhood, Flying Cloud and the horse, Storm, spend their days hunting and roughhousing with the other boys and their horses. But when an enemy raiding party steals his beloved Storm, Flying Cloud faces the ultimate rite of passage. He must join the rescue party and earn the right to wear the shirt of a warrior.

Bold, colorful artwork inspired by the style of the early Plains Indians, illustrates the day-to-day life of the Lakota and tells the story of a boy accepting the challenges of manhood. An author's note gives a brief history of the Lakota and explains the traditions discussed in the story.

Additional Information 
40 pages | 9.25" x 10.62"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$22.95

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Giving Thanks: A Native American Good Morning Message
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Akwesasne Mohawk; Mohawk; Native American;

For as long as anyone can remember, Mohawk parents have taught their children to start each day by giving thanks to Mother Earth. Also known as the Thanksgiving Address, this good morning message is based on the belief that the natural world is a precious and rare gift. The whole universe — from the highest stars to the tiniest blade of grass — is addressed as one great family.

Now readers of all ages can share in this tribute to the environment, adapted especially for children by Chief Jake Swamp, whose efforts to share this vision of thanksgiving take him all over the world. Chief Swamp's inspirational message, along with Erwin Printup, Jr.'s unforgettable landscapes, make Giving Thanks a timeless celebration of the spirit of nature.

Additional Information
24 pages | 7.46" x 11.01"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$15.95

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Grandmother Spider Brings the Sun: A Cherokee Story
Artists:
James Bernadin
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Cherokee;

After Possum and Buzzard fail in their attempts to steal a piece of the sun, Grandmother Spider succeeds in bringing light to the animals on her side of the world.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.30" x 10.70"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$9.95

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Grandmother's Dreamcatcher
Authors:
Becky Ray McCain
Artists:
Stacey Schuett
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Chippewa;

While Kimmy's parents look for a house close to Daddy's job, Kimmy stays with her Chippewa grandmother. The bad dreams she has had still bother her. But with her grandmother's help, she learns about dreamcatchers.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

$10.99

Quantity:
How Chipmunk Got His Stripes
Artists:
Jose Aruego
Ariane Dewey
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American;

In this retelling of a Native American pourquoi tale, Brown Squirrel challenges prideful Bear to keep the sun from rising.

Bear brags that he can do anything-even stop the sun from rising. Brown Squirrel doesn't believe him, so the two wait all night to see if the sun will rise. Sure enough, the sky reddens and the sun appears. Brown Squirrel is so happy to be right that he teases Bear. What happens when a little brown squirrel teases a big black bear? Brown Squirrel gets stripes and is called chipmunk from that day forward . . . Joseph and James Bruchac join forces to create this buoyant picture book, based on a Native American folktale.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 5-8.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

Authentic Indigenous Text
$8.50

Quantity:
How Raven Stole the Sun (Tales of the People)
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Tlingit;

A long time ago, Raven was pure white, like fresh snow in winter. This was so long ago that the only light came from campfires, because a greedy chief kept the stars, moon, and sun locked up in elaborately carved boxes. Determined to free them, the shape-shifting Raven resourcefully transformed himself into the chief's baby grandson and cleverly tricked him into opening the boxes and releasing the starlight and moonlight. Though tired of being stuck in human form, Raven maintained his disguise until he got the chief to open the box with the sun and flood the world with daylight, at which point he gleefully transformed himself back into a raven. When the furious chief locked him in the house, Raven was forced to escape through the small smokehole at the top--and that's why ravens are now black as smoke instead of white as snow.

This engaging Tlingit story is brought to life in painted illustrations that convey a sense of the traditional life of the Northwest Coast peoples.

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.50" x 9.60"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$20.95

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Jingle Dancer
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Muscogee (Creek) Nation; Native American;

The affirming story of how a contemporary Native American girl turns to her family and community to help her dance find a voice.

Jenna, a contemporary Muscogee (Creek) girl, loves the tradition of jingle dancing that has been shared by generations of women in her family, and she hopes to dance at the next powwow. But she has a problem—how will her dress sing if it has no jingles?

The cone-shaped jingles sewn to Grandma Wolfe's dress sing tink, tink, tink, tink.

Jenna's heart beats to the brum, brum, brum, brum of the powwow drum as she daydreams about the clinking song of her grandma's jingle dancing.

The warm, evocative watercolors of Cornelius Van Wright and Ying-Hwa Hu complement author Cynthia Leitich Smith's lyrical text in this picture book. Perfect for classroom and library sharing.

Educator Information
Suggested Ages: 4-8.

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.25" x 11.00"

 

Authentic Indigenous Text
$21.99

Quantity:
Kumak's House
Authors:
Michael Bania
Artists:
Michael Bania
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Alaska Native; Inupiat;

At the edge of a great frozen river, Kumak and his family lived in their house by the willows. Though their house was warm and cozy, Kumak was not happy. His wife was not happy. His sons and daughters were not happy. His wife's mother was not happy. "Too small, this house," said Kumak. "I will go to see Aana Lulu. She will know what to do."

Set in an Inupiat village in the northwest Arctic, Kumak's House is a folktale that conveys a humorous lesson on life with Kumak as the foil. As Kumak treks again and again to elder Aana Lulu for advice, the book's charming illustrations incite laughter and introduce children to traditional Inupiat activities and animals of the Arctic.

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.98" x 8.34"

$15.95

Quantity:
Loving Me
Authors:
Debby Slier
Format: Board Book
Text Content Territories: Native American;

Whether it is a gentle kiss from mom, a hug from dad, a playful romp with an older brother, or reading with grandpa, babies and toddlers will discover the importance of family relationships in these charming photographs of Native American families. Loving Me features multi-generational family members loving and caring for a child, as they caress and tenderly show their babies and young children how much they are loved.

Educator Information
Curriculum Connections: Native American cultures, language arts, cultural awareness, family relationships, responsibility, first words, self-awareness, guardianship, multi-generational families, growing up, read aloud.

Features photographs of Native American families.

Additional Information
32 pages | 11.00" x 8.50"

$8.95

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