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A Northern Alphabet
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3; 4;

Beautifully-illustrated alphabet book depicting the people, animals, and way of people living in the North.

Authentic Canadian Content
$9.99

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A Stranger at Home: A True Story
Editors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7; 8;

The powerful memoir of an Inuvialuit girl searching for her true self when she returns from residential school. 

Traveling to be reunited with her family in the Arctic, 10-year-old Margaret Pokiak can hardly contain her excitement. It's been two years since her parents delivered her to the school run by the dark-cloaked nuns and brothers. 

Coming ashore, Margaret spots her family, but her mother barely recognizes her, screaming, "Not my girl." Margaret realizes she is now marked as an outsider. 

And Margaret is an outsider: she has forgotten the language and stories of her people, and she can't even stomach the food her mother prepares. 

However, Margaret gradually relearns her language and her family's way of living. Along the way, she discovers how important it is to remain true to the ways of her people -- and to herself. 

Highlighted by archival photos and striking artwork, this first-person account of a young girl's struggle to find her place will inspire young readers to ask what it means to belong.

Sequel to Fatty Legs.

Reviews
"This memoir, detailing a woeful piece of Canadian history and demonstrating Margaret's strength of character, compassion, courage and her willingness to sacrifice herself for her family's sake, gives the reader a lot to ponder. Highly recommended." — Shelbey Krahn, Canadian Materials, February 2012

"A Stranger at Home will speak to anyone who has experienced displacement or assimilation into a new culture. This fabulous story enhances the Grades 6 to 8 social studies curriculum." — Professionally Speaking (Ontario College of Teache, April 2012

"While it may not have the same drama and tension of the first memoir, this tale provides a compelling and moving story of a girl searching for the strength to find her place in the world." — Jody Kopple, School Library Journal, December 2011

"Without being graphic or overwhelming, the Fentons recreate a tragic moment in Canadian history through the innocent reflections of a child...a must for any classroom library." — Canadian Teacher Magazine, May 2012

"This tale provides a compelling and moving story of a girl searching for the strength to find her place in the world. The writing is unpretentious and accessible and readers who enjoyed the first book will find this an interesting follow-up. Vivid paintings are a beautiful accompaniment to the storytelling. Photographs from Pokiak Fenton's own collection add important points of reference for readers looking to visualize the characters and the unique setting of the Arctic Circle. A welcome addition to biography collections." — Jody Kopple, School Library Journal, December 2011

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 9-13.

Guided Reading Level: Fountas and Pinnell U

Themes: biography; Inuit; Indigenous peoples; arctic; residential schools; identity; community; Canadian content; family; society; history; memoir.

Additional Information
128 pages | 6.25" x 9.00"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$12.95

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A Ticket Around the World
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5;

Take a tour of thirteen fascinating countries in this introduction to cultures around the world.

Join a young boy as he hops around the globe, visiting friends in 13 different countries spanning all 6 populated continents. Along the way, he introduces us to each friend’s environment and customs, and shares interesting facts about each country’s culture, language, food, geography, wildlife, landmarks and more. Each country has a dedicated spread with a small map that shows geography and landmarks, letting readers imagine they are traveling, too. The format makes it easy to spot similarities and differences between countries.

This informational picture book brings engaging nonfiction content to younger readers by showing them how other children just like them live around the world. Playful, realistic illustrations done with stylized realism lend warmth and whimsy to the book, making each locale feel welcoming. A Ticket Around the World will leave readers feeling like they’ve toured the globe without ever having left home.

Reviews
"The format easily invites comparisons and contrasts, and thought-provoking questions at the end will encourage additional critical thinking." — Booklist

"An excellent resource." – Canadian Children's Book News

"Facts are incorporated into the page seamlessly, like a conversation between friends." — Canadian Review of Materials

"The book's inviting design resembles a scrapbook, with small, fact-filled vignettes sprinkled across the pages... will undoubtedly inspire young armchair travelers." — The National Reading Campaign

Educator Information
Reading Level: Grades 2-5
Fountas & Pinnell: O
Lexile Measure: 1G840L

Curriculum Connections: Language Arts (Reading comprehension, understanding of informational texts); Social Studies (Heritage and Identity; Traditions and Celebrations; World Connections; Communications Around the World)

Key Features of this work:

  • Excellent introduction to the diversity of our world.
  • Each country is explored as if the reader is visiting a child who lives there.
  • Individual maps showcase each country, while a world map at the beginning of the book gives a global view of where each country is located.
  • Includes a brief quiz about the countries visited.

Additional Information
32 pages | 10.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$9.95

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Algonquin Sunset: An Algonquin Quest Novel
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10;

Anokì and his sister Pangì Mahingan have grown up, and now face a decision that will change their lives forever.

Twelve years after Mahingan was wounded battling for his life against the Haudenosaunee warrior known as Ö:nenhste Erhar (Corn Dog), we rejoin his family and learn what fate held for him.

Now, his children, Anokì and Pangì Mahingan, along with their twin cousins Makwa and Wàbek, are grown and have adult responsibilities. Still living with their Algonquin family, they have become a formidable fighting unit with the addition of three Mi´kmaq warriors, E´s, Jilte´g, and the fierce Elue´wiet Ga´qaquj.

However, there is danger in the land of the setting sun, and nothing is more dangerous than what the family is going to encounter from the fierce enemy of their new Anishinaabe allies: the Lakȟóta.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 12-15.

Series Information
This novel is part of the Algonquin Quest Series, a series of young adult novels from Algonquin author Rick Revelle.

Additional Information
304 pages | 5.00" x 8.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$12.99

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Alis the Aviator
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2;

Come along on an aviation journey with Alis! This spunky female guide will take you through an ABC of planes featuring gorgeous cut-paper art.

An A to Z of planes past and present, this book has stunning cut-paper art and a cute-as-a-button guide named Alis. Named for Dr. Alis Kennedy, likely one of the first Indigenous women to obtain a commercial pilot license in Canada, Alis will take you on an aviation tour from the Avro Arrow to the Zeppelin and everything in between. 

Meticulously researched and uniquely crafted, this is a one-of-a-kind book that will delight aviation fans big and little.

Educator Information
This resource contains limited Indigenous content and is a supplemental resource for learning the alphabet and exploring cut-paper art imagery. There is some information included that provides more details about Dr. Alis Kennedy, which is why this resource has been listed as containing Indigenous text.  It is up to readers to determine if this work will be useful for their purposes.

Recommended for ages 3 to 7.

Additional Information
40 pages | 9.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$21.99

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An Inuksuk Means Welcome
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

An inuksuk is a stone landmark that different peoples of the Arctic region build to leave a symbolic message. Inuksuit (the plural of inuksuk) can point the way, express joy, or simply say: welcome. A central image in Inuit culture, the inuksuk frames this picture book as an acrostic: readers will learn seven words from the Inuktitut language whose first letters together spell INUKSUK. Each word is presented in English and in Inuktitut characters, with phonetic pronunciation guides provided.

The words and their definitions give a sense of the traditions and customs of Inuit life in the Arctic: nanuq is the powerful polar bear of the north; kamik is a warm seal- and caribou-skin boot; and siku is sea ice. Stunning paintings with deep color and rich texture evoke a powerful sense of place and show great respect for the Arctic's indigenous people.

Extra informational text features include an introductory note about the significance of inuksuit in Inuit culture and a nonfiction page that profiles seven different types of inuksuit. 

Reviews
"The presence of a close-knit Inuit family...brings a loving warmth to the Arctic landscape Wallace so affectionately portrays."— Publisher's Weekly

"An Inuksuk Means Welcome" is a multi-sensory tour through life in the Arctic for thousands of years, beautifully presented for children of all ages."— The Midwest Book Review's Children's Bookwatch

"A solid complement to social studies lessons about traditional Inuit customs and the languages of Canada."— National Reading Campaign

"This book is a fun and aesthetically striking way to teach children about a new language and culture, and could be a useful tool for early primary school social studies classes."— Green Teacher

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 3-8, this resource is useful for the following subjects: Art, English Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies.

The seven words from the Inuktitut language that readers will learn are presented in English and in Inuktitut characters, with phonetic pronunciation guides provided.  The explanations of words are provided in English.

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.00" x 12.00"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
$18.95

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Avati: Discovering Arctic Ecology
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6;

The Arctic is not a barren, frigid landscape filled with only ice and snow. It is a complex ecosystem that contains many thriving habitats, each supported by dozens of ecological relationships between plants and animals.

From the many animals that live and hunt at the floe edge, to the hundreds of insects that abound on the summer tundra, this book gives a detailed bird's-eye view of the fascinating ways that animals, plants, and insects co-exist in the Arctic ecosystem.

Written by Mia Pelletier, a biologist and wilderness field researcher, and complete with a glossary to clearly explain biological terms to young readers, this book provides a sound informational basis to understanding the Arctic ecosystem in all its facets.

Reviews

"An ecologist who lives and works in Earth’s far, far north describes the changing seasons in the part of the world the Inuit call Nunavut—“our land.” Weaving together information about the land and water, plants and animals, Pelletier provides a clear depiction of an Arctic environment. Unlike some introductions to this part of the world, this account presents a full web of life. Her food chain begins with the tiny algae underneath the sea ice. From diatoms and amphipods to the fish, birds, insects and mammals that inhabit the land and the sea edges of this environment (avati in Inuit), she connects them to one another, to the plants of the brief summer and to the changing stages of ice. She doesn’t hesitate to introduce new vocabulary (defined in a concluding glossary), Inuit words (defined in context) and onomatopoetic sounds. What appear to be pencil-and-watercolor illustrations extend far across the gutters. Appropriately matched with the text, set in a column on the right-hand side of each spread, they reward careful inspection. Teachers and librarians may want to pair this useful title with A Walk on the Tundra, by Rebecca Hainnu and Anna Ziegler." - Kirkus Review

Additional Information
45 pages | 10.25" x 8.25"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
$14.95

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Because I am a Girl: I Can Change the World
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7;

Because when a girl is given her basic human rights she can lift herself - and everyone around her - out of poverty.

Rosemary McCarney, President and CEO of Plan International Canada, has followed up her popular picture book Every Day is Malala Day with a book for middle-grade readers, also inspired by her international development work. Working with Plan, Rosemary helped craft its Because I am a Girl global initiative to end gender inequality, promote girls' rights, and lift millions of girls out of poverty, and helped lead the charge for the United Nations to declare October 11th the "International Day of the Girl" - a day each year to recognize and advocate for girls' rights globally.

This book illustrates the Because I am a Girl call to change by telling the stories of individual girls throughout the world. They tell us: "Because I am a girl, I eat if there is food left over when everyone is done" and "I am the poorest of the poor." The later stories are about hope, with chapters like "Because I am a girl, I will share what I know" and " I am the heart of my community" and "I can change the world." Illustrated with Plan's amazing photographs and including "Did You Know" fact sections.

 

Read about:
Lucy, an orphan in Zimbabwe, who struggles to find enough food for herself and her sister; Kathryn, from South Sudan, who teaches the younger children in the refugee camp where she lives; Farwa, who was destined to become a child bride in Pakistan; Fahmeeda, a Youth Ambassador from Canada, who works to protect the rights of women and children around the world; and four more.

Reviews
"Because I am a Girl allows middle-grade students to meet many other girls who have faced incredible obstacles to work for change and education and a promising future." — Midwest Book Review, November 2014

"This beautifully photographed book should adorn the shelves of every classroom and library and should be shared with children in the junior and middle grades throughout the world to increase awareness of the Because I am a Girl movement.— Canadian Children's Book News, February 2015

Additional Information
96 pages | 7.50" x 9.00"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
$16.95

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Bus to the Badlands
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4;

Josh, Mark, Angela and their friends have been waiting for years to go on the class trip to Drumheller, Alberta. Now they are finally the oldest kids at Pleasant Valley grade school and can get excited about the overnight outing. But first, they have a lot of learn about what they'll see in the dinosaur capital of the world. And they have to raise money for all the pizza they are going to eat on the trip! Once they finally get going, a frightening encounter with a slithery serpent leads to an amazing discovery. One that might be even better than all-you-can-eat deep dish!

Educator & Series Information
Recommended Grades: 2-4

This book is part of the Orca Echoes series of early chapter books intended to engage young readers while promoting personal development and social responsibility.  

Additional Information
88 pages | 7.62" x 5.25"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
$6.95

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Coyote Tales
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4;

Two tales, set in a time “when animals and human beings still talked to each other,” display Thomas King’s cheeky humor and master storytelling skills. Freshly illustrated and reissued as an early chapter book, these stories are perfect for newly independent readers.

In Coyote Sings to the Moon, Coyote is at first the cause of misfortune. In those days, when the moon was much brighter and closer to the earth, Old Woman and the animals would sing to her each night. Coyote attempts to join them, but his voice is so terrible they beg him to stop. He is crushed and lashes out — who needs Moon anyway? Furious, Moon dives into a pond, plunging the world into darkness. But clever Old Woman comes up with a plan to send Moon back up into the sky and, thanks to Coyote, there she stays.

In Coyote’s New Suit, mischievous Raven wreaks havoc when she suggests that Coyote’s toasty brown suit is not the finest in the forest, thus prompting him to steal suits belonging to all the other animals. Meanwhile, Raven tells the other animals to borrow clothes from the humans’ camp. When Coyote finds that his closet is too full, Raven slyly suggests he hold a yard sale, then sends the human beings (in their underwear) and the animals (in their ill-fitting human clothes) along for the fun. A hilarious illustration of the consequences of wanting more than we need.

Educator Information
Recommended for Grades K-4 English Language Arts.

Curriculum Connections: Social Studies, Language Arts, History, Indigenous Studies.

Recommended Ages: 6 - 9.

Additional Information
56 pages | 5.25" x 7.75"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$16.95

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Dah Dẕāhge Esigits: We Write Our Language
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Tahltan (Nahanni);
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

This beautifully illustrated book teaches the language of the Tahltan nation. The Tahltan alphabet is featured with the 47 sounds of the Tahltan language. Learners can match vowels, consonants and sounds to English equivalents and symbols. It is a resource for those who can already speak Tahltan, but wish to learn to read and write as well.

From the Preface:
The (Tahltan) Alphabet was developed by linguist Colin Carter in consultation with Tahltan speakers, Elders and language instructors...The (Tahltan) Alphabet...is phonetic, which means that every Tahltan sound is written with consistent symbols. This is different from the English alphabet where sounds can be written with various letters and combinations of them. The Tahltan alphabet is a summation of the 47 sounds of the Tahltan language. Carter and the Tahltan consultants decided to use English letters and represent specialized Tahltan sounds with more than one letter (eg dz, tl, ch) and other markings such as underlining, apostrophe and macron.

Educator Information
Recommended for Grades K-7 English Language Arts and courses in Indigenous language learning.

This book was coordinated by Edosdi Dr. Judy Thompson, developed by language leaders Angela Dennis, Regina Louis and Odelia Dennis, and illustrated by Una-Ann Moyer, Perer Morin and Tsema Igharas. The Telegraph Creek / Dease Lake dialect was contributed by Dah Dzahge Nodeside chair, Hostelma Pauline Hawkins in collaboration with fluent speakers Margery Inkster and Janet Vance from Telegraph Creek, BC. This book is produced with the intention to inspire future generations of Tahltan speakers and aid in Tahltan cultural sustainability.

Dr. Judy Thompson is an Assistant Professor in First Nations Studies at the University of Northern BC. Odelia Dennis teaches Tahltan as a second language to adults through the University of Victoria's Diploma in Indigenous Language Revitalization Program.

Additional Information
108 pages | 9.00" x 8.50" | colour and b&w drawings

 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$19.95

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Dragonfly Song
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

The girl has had many selves in her short life. The first she remembers is Aissa, the daughter of Mama and Dada, sister to Zufi who watched the goats. Then the Bull King's raiders came, and Mama said, "Don't make a sound till I come back." And when the villagers found her she was silent as stone, because Mama never came back again.

So the villagers cursed her as back luck and made her No-Name, lowest of the servants to the Lady, the island's priestess. But there were whispers, as she grew, of another self: of the Lady's rejected first daughter, born imperfect with two extra thumbs. The silent girl looks at the scars on her wrists and wonders, but she has more pressing concerns. The villagers blame her bad luck for the tribute the Bull King now demands of them: two youths given each spring to dance with his bulls and die for his god's glory. And the servants hate and fear the unnatural way the animals all come to her. For Aissa, though, this bond with creatures of fur and scale is the first clue in finding the true self that no one else can give to her, or take away.

Wendy Orr, the author of Nim's Island, introduces a resourceful and resilient heroine for slightly older readers. Inspired by an archeological trip to the island of Crete, where frescoes show figures leaping over the backs of bulls, Orr weaves an intriguing mythological portrayal of the Bronze Age Minoan civilization. Lyrically written and refreshingly unpredictable, Dragonfly Song suggests a fascinating origin for the legend of the Minotaur and his dark tribute.

Reviews
"Orr tells her tale in both narrative poetry and prose for an effect that is both fanciful and urgent, drawing a rich fantasy landscape filled with people and creatures worthy of knowing. An introductory note describes Orr's inspiration in the legend of the Minotaur, but her story is no retelling but a meditation on rejection and acceptance, on determination and self-determination. The shifts between poetry and prose build tension just as surely as the bull dances do. As mesmerizing as a mermaid's kiss, the story dances with emotion, fire, and promise."—Kirkus Reviews Starred Review

"The Bronze Age setting makes for a unique backdrop, and Aissa is a sympathetic character. Her struggles are heartrending, and made more so by the lyrical storytelling style. The descriptions of the dances are especially vivid. VERDICT: Hand-sell this unusual tale to fans of Shannon Hale's historical fantasies."—School Library Journal

"A retelling of the legend of the Minotaur, Orr tells Aissa's tale in a lyrical mix of narrative poetry and prose, using lush, vivid language to create an unparalleled fantasy world full of life and lively characters. While young readers with a special interest in history will immediately be drawn into this meticulously researched, literary story, its fast-paced, adventurous, epic feel will undoubtedly appeal to all readers."—Booklist

"The narrative style shifts between straightforward, lyrical prose and imagistic free-verse poetry, a technique that infuses the story with a dreamlike atmosphere. Both forms advance the action, but the poetry enhances the sense of intimacy by focusing attention on Aissa's impressionistic views of the world and her sense of isolation among the people who fear, bully, and reject her. Her ultimate triumph is credibly compromised, making this an unusually thoughtful offering in the middle-school mythology genre."—Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"[A] work of beauty. From the stunning cover to the mythological imagery and lyrical prose, readers are drawn in and carried along on an intense ride....Orr's language is gripping and enchanting, and Dragonfly Song would make a perfect read-aloud chapter book for middle grade teachers. While the academic cross-curricular subject areas are obvious, including history, mythology, religion, spirituality, even bullying, I enjoyed this story simply as a pleasure read. Readers will find that Dragonfly Song and its fearless heroine will stick with them long after the final chapter. Highly Recommended."—CM Magazine

"Dragonfly Song is an impressive work of middle-grade historical fiction. Aissa is a brave, tenacious girl, who rebels against the constraints of her life without appearing anachronistic. There isn't a lot of young people's fiction set in the Bronze Age, and the details here are lovingly researched, creating a transportive world. Especially noteworthy is the representation of religion in a pre-Christian setting, as the book explores both its beauty and brutality."—Quill & Quire

"[Dragonfly Song] was very original and creative....I also like that the book was partially written in poetry and partially written in prose. Books are usually one or the other, so I like how the author wove them together. I love how this story was very detailed, as I could picture almost everything. Overall, Dragonfly Song was an amazing book."—Farrah, Age 11, Kids' BookBuzz

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 10-14

Additional Information
408 pages | 5.50" x 7.80"

Authentic Canadian Content
$19.95

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Embers: One Ojibway's Meditations
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

"Life sometimes is hard. There are challenges. There are difficulties. There is pain. As a younger man I sought to avoid them and only ever caused myself more of the same. These days I choose to face life head on--and I have become a comet. I arc across the sky of my life and the harder times are the friction that lets the worn and tired bits drop away. It's a good way to travel; eventually, I will wear away all resistance until all there is left of me is light. I can live towards that end." - Richard Wagamese, Embers

In this carefully curated selection of everyday reflections, Richard Wagamese finds lessons in both the mundane and sublime as he muses on the universe, drawing inspiration from working in the bush--sawing and cutting and stacking wood for winter as well as the smudge ceremony to bring him closer to the Creator. Embers is perhaps Richard Wagamese's most personal volume to date. Honest, evocative and articulate, he explores the various manifestations of grief, joy, recovery, beauty, gratitude, physicality and spirituality--concepts many find hard to express. But for Wagamese, spirituality is multifaceted. Within these pages, readers will find hard-won and concrete wisdom on how to feel the joy in the everyday things. Wagamese does not seek to be a teacher or guru, but these observations made along his own journey to become, as he says, "a spiritual bad-ass," make inspiring reading.

Additional Information
140 pages | 6.00" x 8.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$18.95

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Flow, Spin, Grow: Looking for Patterns in Nature
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

Branching, spiraling, spinning—you can find patterns almost anywhere in nature, if you look for them. This book is a starting point that introduces kids to some major patterns in the natural world. Just as the branches of a tree spread upwards into the sky, roots branch deep into the ground. Branches also spread through our bodies, inside our lungs and veins. Storms and snail shells spiral; electrons and galaxies spin.

With brief text and full-spread illustrations, this book is designed to inspire kids to observe, discover, and explore hidden structures and shapes in the natural world around them. Why are things the way they are? This question, key to scientific inquiry, runs throughout the text.

Artwork in multilayered screen prints shows how the natural world is inherently beautiful, from the curve of your ear to the spiraling arms of our galaxy. Kids will come away with a deeper understanding that we are all connected to nature and part of its patterns.

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 4-8.

Curriculum Connections:

  • Language Arts: Reading Comprehension
  • Math: Patterns

Key Features:

  • Excellent STEM pick with links to math, space, weather patterns, the human body, and more.
  • Encourages kids to observe and inquire about the world around them.
  • Author's note provides further deatil about patterns in nature and the human body.

Reading Levels
Grade: K-5
Fountas & Pinnell: N

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$19.95

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Gaawin Gindaaswin Ndaawsii / I Am Not A Number
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

Dual language edition of powerful children's book about residential school experience reflects Indigenous language revitalization.

The dual language edition, in Nishnaabemwin (Ojibwe) Nbisiing dialect and English, of the award-winning I Am Not a Number. When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from, despite the efforts of the nuns who are in charge at the school and who tell her that she is not to use her own name but instead use the number they have assigned to her. When she goes home for summer holidays, Irene's parents decide never to send her and her brothers away again. But where will they hide? And what will happen when her parents disobey the law? Based on the life of co-author Jenny Kay Dupuis’ grandmother, I Am Not a Number is a hugely necessary book that brings a terrible part of Canada’s history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to.

Reviews
"Residential and boarding school stories are hard to read, but they're vitally important... books like I Am Not a Number should be taught in schools in Canada, and the U.S., too."— Debbie Reese, American Indians in Children's Literature

"It’s important to teach children about true Canadian history, but it’s not easy to talk about it in a way that children will understand. I Am Not a Number is perfect to get the conversation about residential schools started with your children. It opens the door for them to ask questions about the subject and the story is relatable in a way they can follow."— Residential School Magazine

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 7-11
Guided Reading: V

Dual-language: Nishnaabemwin (Ojibwe) Nbisiing dialect and English.

Subjects: Character Education (Empathy, Prejudice & Tolerance); History & Social Studies (Canadian History, First Nations & Indigenous Peoples); Government & Citizenship; Reflecting Diversity

Additional Information
44 pages | 8.50" x 11.00" | Translated by Muriel Sawyer and Geraldine McLeod with contributions by Tory Fisher

 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$14.95

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