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Indigenous Peoples of Canada

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Decolonizing Research: Indigenous Storywork as Methodology
Format: Paperback

A landmark exploration from indigenous scholars and activists into how indigenous storytelling practices can decolonize the research of indigenous societies.

From Oceania to North America, indigenous peoples have created storytelling traditions of incredible depth and diversity. The term “indigenous storywork” has come to encompass the sheer breadth of ways in which indigenous storytelling serves as a historical record, as a form of teaching and learning, and as an expression of indigenous culture and identity. But such traditions have too often been relegated to the realm of myth and legend, recorded as fragmented distortions, or erased altogether.

Decolonizing Research brings together indigenous researchers and activists from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand to assert the unique value of indigenous storywork as a focus of research, and to develop methodologies that rectify the colonial attitudes inherent in much past and current scholarship. By bringing together their own indigenous perspectives, and by treating indigenous storywork on its own terms, the contributors illuminate valuable new avenues for research, and show how such reworked scholarship can contribute to the movement for indigenous rights and self-determination.

Educator Information
Table of Contents

  • Part I: Aotearoa NZ
    • 1. PĆ«rākau: From the Inside Out - Jenny Lee-Morgan
    • 2. Within the Womb of our Ancestor: Restoring and Restorying our Ancestral Lnowledges through Wānanga - Naomi Simmonds
    • 3. Naming our Names and Telling our Stories - Joeliee Seed-Pihama
    • 4. PĆ«rākau as Method: Storying Gender in Māori Worlds - Hayley Marama Cavino
    • 5. Indigenous Storywork and Law: Exploring Māori Legal Traditions - Carwyn Jones
    • 6. Whānau Storytelling as a Decolonial Research Method - Leonie Pihama
  • Part II: Australia
    • 7. Yanyba Jarngkurr, Kingkalli: Song Tradition Renewal and Story-World Enactments of Sustainable Autonomy - Jason De Santolo, Gadrian Hoosan, Bruce King
    • 8. Indigenous Story-Telling: Decolonising Institutions and Assertive Self-Determination and implications for Legal Practice - Larissa Behrendt
    • 9. Designing a Sovereign Storytelling Model - Dr Romaine Moreton
    • 10. Fire Country: A Storied Journey into the Revitalising of Ancient Fire Knowledge Practices - Victor Steffensen
    • 11. Lilyology as a Transformative Framework for Decolonising Ethical Spaces within the Academy - Nerida Blair
    • 12. Storywork in Storytelling: Indigenous Knowledges as Literary Theory - Evelyn Araluen Corr
  • Part III: Canada
    • 13. Indigenous Storywork: Past, Present, and Future - Jo-ann Archibald Q’um Q’um Xiiem
    • 14. Indigenous Visual Storywork for Indigenous Film Aesthetics - Dorothy Christian
    • 15. Using the Indigenous Storywork Principles to Guide Ethical Practices in Research - Sara Florence Davidson
    • 16. Leq’7es te Stsptekwll: Our Memories Long Ago - Georgina Martin and Elder Jean William
    • 17. Indigenous Storywork, Mathematics Education, and Community-Based Research - Cynthia Nicol, Joanne Yovanovich, Jo-ann Archibald

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256 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$43.50

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Haida Eagle Treasures: Traditional Stories and Memories from a Teacher of the Tsath Lanas Clan
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Take a journey into the heart of Haida culture as it is lived and experienced by an extraordinary woman of the Tsath Lanas Eagle Clan. Pansy Collison, a Haida woman born and raised in Old Massett on Haida Gwaii, tells stories of her clan and community, as well as personal narratives about her history and family. Haida Eagle Treasures embodies a strong Haida woman’s voice, offering a rare glimpse inside Haida culture. Each story and memory is a treasure that captures part of the beauty of the Haida worldview and way of life.

Now retired, Pansy taught for 23 years at elementary, secondary, and college levels. From these experiences, she describes some of the challenges and contradictions of living between two worlds. Pansy’s teaching skills, artistic talents, and political affiliations keep her involved in politics and education on Haida Gwaii.

Thirteen original illustrations by Pansy’s brother, Paul White, a gifted artist, teacher, pole carver and designer, provide the guideposts within Haida Eagle Treasures.

Educator Information
Recommended in the Canadian Indigenous Books for Schools 2019-2020 resource list as being useful for grades 8-12 for English Language Arts and Social Studies.

Caution: use of the term "Native" throughout.

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244 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"  | 2nd Edition

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Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$24.95

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Niniskamijinaqik / Ancestral Images: The Mi'kmaq in Art and Photography
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq;

The Mi’kmaq of Atlantic Canada were here for thousands of years before the arrival of European peoples. Niniskamijinaqik / Ancestral Images: The Mi’kmaq in Art and Photography presents their unique culture and way of life through the remarkable and sometime complex lives of individuals, as depicted in artwork or photography.

The opening images in this collection were created by the Mi’kmaq themselves: portrayals of human beings carved into the rock formations of Nova Scotia. Then there are the earliest surviving European depictions of Mi’kmaq, decorations on the maps of Samuel de Champlain. Finally we see portraits of Mi’kmaw individuals, ancestors in whom we see their “humanity frozen in the stillness of a photograph,” as the writers of the book’s foreword describe.

Niniskamijinaqik / Ancestral Images includes 94 compelling pieces of art and photography, chosen from more than a thousand extant portraits in different media, that show the Mi’kmaw people. Each image is an entry point to deeply personal history, a small moment or single person transformed into vivid immediacy for the reader.

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128 pages | 10.00" x 8.00" | b&w photographs

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$29.95

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Kwakiutl Legends: As Told to Pamela Whitaker by Chief James Wallas
Format: Paperback

The stories in this book relate the traditional tales which Mr. James Wallas has learned from his elders, who lived in Quatsino Sound and on Hope Island. Mr. Wallas's forefathers are members of a people known generally as the Kwakiutl, although the term is misleading because it originally referred to a sub-group living at Fort Rupert. The Kwakiutl inhabit an area which at present includes Campbell River at the southern extreme, Quatsino Sound at the western extreme, various inlets of mainland B.C. at the eastern extreme, and Smiths Inlet at the northern extreme. Traditionally, the Kwakiutl lived in villages located in this general area (excluding Campbell River an Cape Mudge) which were organized into tribes. Today, most of them live on reserves near towns, maintaining some remote villages for food preparation and preserving during the spring, summer and fall.

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216 pages | 5.50" x 8.50" | 11 Colour Line Drawings

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$16.95

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Medicines to Help Us: Traditional MĂ©tis Plant Use (Resource Guide Only)
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; MĂ©tis;

Based on Métis artist Christi Belcourt’s painting “Medicines to Help Us,” this innovative and vibrant resource honours the centuries-old healing traditions of Métis women. With contributions from Métis Elders Rose Richardson and Olive Whitford, as well as key Michif phrases and terminology, Medicines to Help Us is the most accessible resource relating to Métis healing traditions produced to date.

Educator Information
This resource guide does not include the study prints referred to on the back cover and within the book.  For the study prints and resource guide, check out Medicines to Help Us: Traditional Métis Plant Use - Study Prints & Resource Guide on our website.

Michif Translators: Laura Burnoff and Rita Flamand

Elder Validation: Rose Richardson

Format: Book Only - English, with plant names in Michif, Nehiyawewin (Cree), and Anishinaabemowin (Ojibway)

 

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$25.00

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Medicines to Help Us: Traditional MĂ©tis Plant Use - Study Prints & Resource Guide
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; MĂ©tis;

Based on Métis artist Christi Belcourt’s painting “Medicines to Help Us,” this innovative and vibrant resource honours the centuries-old healing traditions of Métis women.

In the Michif language, the words for medicine include "Mhaskigi," "Maskihkiya," and "Askipasan."  Within each word is an innate awareness that the healing power of plants is a life force generated from the strength of Mother Earth.

Medicines to Help Us: Traditional Métis Plant Use is a stunning set of 30 full-colour gallery-quality study prints and an accompanying companion guide in which Christi Belcourt fuses her evocative artwork with research on plants and traditional knowledge to explore traditional Métis medicinal knowledge and the medicinal properties of the plants depicted in her painting.  This innovative and vibrant resource honours the centuries-old healing traditions of Métis woman.

Filled with full-colour photographs, maps, illustrations, and the names of plants listed in three Aboriginal languages - Michif, Nehiyawewin (Cree), and Anishinaabemowin (Ojibway) - each study print showcases a type of wild plant that can be found in one or all of the provinces of the Métis Homeland, from Ontario to British Columbia.  In addition, the reverse sides of the 8.5" x 11" study prints can be assembled to recreate a highly detailed 60" replica of Belcourt's painting.

Along with an essay by Elder Rose Richardson on her first-hand experience in using medicinal plants, this compelling one-of-a-kind resource melds Métis contemporary art and the floral motif within Métis beadwork with Métis traditional knowledge.

Educator Information
Translators: Laura Burnoff and Rita Flamand

Elder Validation: Rose Richardson

Format: Prints and Book.  Written in English with plant names in three languages: Michif, Nehiyawewin (Cree), and Anishinaabemowin (Ojibway)

 

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$90.00

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The Western Metis: Profile of a People
Editors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; MĂ©tis;

This book contains a collection of articles concerning the Western Metis, published in Prairie Forum between 1978 and 2007. These articles have been chosen for the breadth and scope of the investigations upon which they are based, and for the reflections they will arouse in anyone interested in Western Canadian history and politics.

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326 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$29.95

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WĂ­cihitowin: Aboriginal Social Work in Canada
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Inuit; MĂ©tis;

Wícihitowin is the first Canadian social work book written by First Nations, Inuit and Métis authors who are educators at schools of social work across Canada. The book begins by presenting foundational theoretical perspectives that develop an understanding of the history of colonization and theories of decolonization and Indigenist social work. It goes on to explore issues and aspects of social work practice with Indigenous people to assist educators, researchers, students and practitioners to create effective and respectful approaches to social work with diverse populations. Traditional Indigenous knowledge that challenges and transforms the basis of social work with Indigenous and other peoples comprises a third section of the book. Wícihitowin concludes with an eye to the future, which the authors hope will continue to promote the innovations and creativity presented in this groundbreaking work.

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Foreword (Richard Vedan)

SECTION 1: History and Theory
Thoughts Make Dreaming: Historical and Theoretical Aspects for Indigenous Social Work by Gord Bruyere (Amawaajibitang)
Bridging the Past and the Future: An Introduction to Indigenous Social Work Issues by Raven Sinclair (Ótiskewápíwskew)
Anti-Colonial Indigenous Social Work: Reflections on an Aboriginal Approach by Michael Anthony Hart (Kaskitémahikan)
Indigenous-Centred Social Work: Theorizing a Social Work Way-of-Being by Gail Baikie

SECTION 2: Practice
Dreaming Makes Action: The Practice of Indigenous Social Work by Gord Bruyere (Amawaajibitang)
A Holistic Approach to Supporting Children with Special Needs by Rona Sterling-Collins (Quistaletko)
Identity or Racism? Aboriginal Transracial Adoption by Raven Sinclair (Ótiskewápíwskew)
Beyond Audacity and Aplomb: Understanding the Métis in Social Work Practice by Cathy Richardson (Kinewesquao) and Dana Lynn Seaborn
Evolution and Revolution: Healing Approaches with Aboriginal Adults by Cyndy Baskin (On-koo-khag-kno kwe)
For Indigenous People, by Indigenous People, with Indigenous People: Towards an Indigenous Research Paradigm by Michael Anthony Hart (Kaskitémahikan)

SECTION 3: Traditional Knowledge
The Spirit of Dreaming: Traditional Knowledge for Indigenous Social Work by Gord Bruyere (Amawaajibitang)
Navigating the Landscape of Practice: Dbaagmowin of a Helper by Kathy Absolon (Minogiizhigokwe)
Kaxlaya Gvila: Upholding Traditional Heiltsuk Laws, Values and Practices as Aboriginal People and Allies. by Michelle Reid (Juba)
Gyawaglaab (Helping one Another): Approaches to Best Practices through Teachings of Oolichan Fishing by Jacquie Green (Hemaas, Moosmagilth, Ungwa, knewq Kundoque of the Helkinew clan, knewq Haisla, Kemano and Kitselas)

Conclusion by Michael Hart (Kaskitémahikan), with Raven Sinclair (Ótiskewápíwskew)
Closing Words
Notes
References

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256 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$39.00

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The Whaling People of the West Coast of Vancouver Island and Cape Flattery
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

The Whaling People live along the west coast of Vancouver Island and Cape Flattery in Washington. They comprise more than 20 First Nations, including the Nuu-chah-nulth (formerly called Nootka), Ditidaht, Pacheedaht and Makah. These socially related people enjoyed a highly organized, tradition-based culture for centuries before Europeans arrived. As whaling societies, they had a unique relationship with the sea.

In The Whaling People, Eugene Arima and Alan Hoover give an intimate account of the traditional ways in which these coastal people looked at and understood the world they lived in. They present the activities, technologies, and rituals that the Whaling People used to make a living in their complex coastal environments, and their beliefs about the natural and supernatural forces that affected their lives. The book features 12 narratives collected from First Nations elders, each illustrated with original drawings by the celebrated Hesquiaht artist Tim Paul.

This informative and entertaining book celebrates the still-thriving cultures of the Whaling People, who survived the devastating effects of colonial power and influences. It includes a history of treaty-making in BC, leading up to the just-ratified Maa-nulth Treaty signed by five First Nations of the Whaling People.

Additional Information
272 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authenticity Note: Because of the artwork and narratives contributed to this work from First Nations elders and Hesquiaht artist Tim Paul, it has received the Authentic Text and Artwork labels. It's up to readers to determine if this work qualifies as authentic for their purposes.

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$19.95

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Halfbreed: Restored Edition
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; MĂ©tis;

A new, fully restored edition of the essential Canadian classic.

An unflinchingly honest memoir of her experience as a Métis woman in Canada, Maria Campbell's Halfbreed depicts the realities that she endured and, above all, overcame. Maria was born in Northern Saskatchewan, her father the grandson of a Scottish businessman and Métis woman--a niece of Gabriel Dumont whose family fought alongside Riel and Dumont in the 1885 Rebellion; her mother the daughter of a Cree woman and French-American man. This extraordinary account, originally published in 1973, bravely explores the poverty, oppression, alcoholism, addiction, and tragedy Maria endured throughout her childhood and into her early adult life, underscored by living in the margins of a country pervaded by hatred, discrimination, and mistrust. Laced with spare moments of love and joy, this is a memoir of family ties and finding an identity in a heritage that is neither wholly Indigenous or Anglo; of strength and resilience; of indominatable spirit.

This edition of Halfbreed includes a new introduction written by Indigenous (Métis) scholar Dr. Kim Anderson detailing the extraordinary work that Maria has been doing since its original publication 46 years ago, and an afterword by the author looking at what has changed, and also what has not, for Indigenous people in Canada today. Restored are the recently discovered missing pages from the original text of this groundbreaking and significant work.

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224 pages | 5.21" x 7.99"

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$19.95

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A Rush to Judgment: The Unfair Trial of Louis Riel
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; MĂ©tis;

Did Louis Riel have a fair trial?

The trial and conviction of Louis Riel for treason in the summer of 1885 and his execution on November 16, 1885, have been the subject of historical comment and criticism for over one hundred years. A Rush to Judgment challenges the view held by some historians that Riel received a fair trial.

Roger E. Salhany argues that the judge allowed the prosecutors to control the proceedings, was biased in his charge to the jury, and failed to properly explain to the jury how they were to consider the evidence of legal insanity. He also argues that the government was anxious to ensure the execution of Riel, notwithstanding the recommendation of the jury for clemency, because of concerns that if Riel was sent to a mental hospital or prison, he would eventually be released and cause further trouble.

Additional Information
352 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" | 13 b&w illustrations, index, bibliography, notes.

Authentic Canadian Content
$24.99

Coming Soon
Leading from Between: Indigenous Participation and Leadership in the Public Services
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Australian; Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Since the 1970s governments in Canada and Australia have introduced policies designed to recruit Indigenous people into public services. Today, there are thousands of Indigenous public servants in these countries, and hundreds in senior roles. Their presence raises numerous questions: How do Indigenous people experience public-sector employment? What perspectives do they bring to it? And how does Indigenous leadership enhance public policy making?

A comparative study of Indigenous public servants in British Columbia and Queensland, Leading from Between addresses critical concerns about leadership, difference, and public service. Centring the voices, personal experiences, and understandings of Indigenous public servants, this book uses their stories and testimony to explore how Indigenous participation and leadership change the way policies are made. Articulating a new understanding of leadership and what it could mean in contemporary public service, Catherine Althaus and Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh challenge the public service sector to work towards a more personalized and responsive bureaucracy.

At a time when Canada and Australia seek to advance reconciliation and self-determination agendas, Leading from Between shows how public servants who straddle the worlds of Western bureaucracy and Indigenous communities are key to helping governments meet the opportunities and challenges of growing diversity.

Reviews
Leading from Between offers numerous insights of great importance to those engaged in Indigenous studies, public administration, and policy studies in Australia and Canada. It will stimulate a new line of inquiry into the promise and the challenges of reconciliation. The authors lay down an evidence-based challenge to public services to fundamentally rethink how to advance and support Indigenous participation and leadership.” - Michael J. Prince, University of Victoria

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296 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" | 7 tables, 1 diagram

$34.95

Coming Soon
Voices from the Skeena: An Illustrated Oral History
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

The Skeena, second longest river in the province, remains an icon of British Columbia’s northwest. Called Xsien (“water of the clouds”) by the Tsimshian and Gitksan, it has always played a vital role in the lives of Indigenous people of the region. Since the 1800s, it has also become home to gold seekers, traders, salmon fishers and other settlers who were drawn by the area’s beauty and abundant natural resources.

Voices from the Skeena takes readers on a journey inspired directly by the people who lived there. Combining forty illustrations with text selected from the pioneer interviews CBC radio producer Imbert Orchard recorded in the 1960s, the book follows the arrival of the Europeans and the introduction of the fur trade to the Omineca gold rush and the building of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad.

Open the pages to meet Robert Cunningham, an Anglican missionary who would later become the founder of the thriving Port Essington. Here too is a man called Cataline, a packer for whom no settlement was too remote to reach, and the indominable Sarah Glassey, the first woman to pre-empt land in British Columbia. At the heart of these stories is the river, weaving together a narrative of a people and their culture. Pairing the stories with Roy Henry Vicker’s vibrant art creates a unique and captivating portrait of British Columbia that will appeal to art lovers and history readers alike.

Additional Information
112 pages | 11.00" x 8.00" | 40 colour illustrations

This work has received the Authentic Indigenous Text label because of the interviews/contributions with Indigenous people like Vicky Sims and Chief Jeffrey H. Johnson. It is up to readers to determine if this work is authentic for their purposes.

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$29.95

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Blanket Toss Under Midnight Sun: Portraits of Everyday Life in Eight Indigenous Communities
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Inuit; MĂ©tis;

A revelatory portrait of eight Indigenous communities from across North America, shown through never-before-published archival photographs--a gorgeous extension of Paul Seesequasis's popular social media project.

In 2015, writer and journalist Paul Seesequasis found himself grappling with the devastating findings of Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission report on the residential school system. He sought understanding and inspiration in the stories of his mother, herself a residential school survivor. Gradually, Paul realized that another, mostly untold history existed alongside the official one: that of how Indigenous peoples and communities had held together during even the most difficult times. He embarked on a social media project to collect archival photos capturing everyday life in First Nations, MĂ©tis and Inuit communities from the 1920s through the 1970s. As he scoured archives and libraries, Paul uncovered a trove of candid images and began to post these on social media, where they sparked an extraordinary reaction. Friends and relatives of the individuals in the photographs commented online, and through this dialogue, rich histories came to light for the first time.

Blanket Toss Under Midnight Sun collects some of the most arresting images and stories from Paul's project. While many of the photographs live in public archives, most have never been shown to the people in the communities they represent. As such, Blanket Toss is not only an invaluable historical record, it is a meaningful act of reclamation, showing the ongoing resilience of Indigenous communities, past, present--and future.
 
Reviews
“A revelatory work of astonishing grace, Blanket Toss Under Midnight Sun encapsulates an invisible generation brought to glorious life. So many times, the subject could have been my auntie, cousin or grandmother. When people ask why I live on the rez, I’ll point them to this book, this stunning reclamation of narrative, which so movingly shows the love of place, community and self.” —Eden Robinson

“Paul Seesequasis's Blanket Toss Under Midnight Sun is a wonderful collection of found photographs and recovered histories that link us to a past as old as the land and as precious as breath.” —Thomas King, author of The Inconvenient Indian

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192 pages | 7.08" x 9.03" | Colour photos throughout


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$32.95

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First Nations Self-Government: 17 Roadblocks, and One Chief's Thoughts on Solutions
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

Indigenous Peoples in Canada are continuing to assert their right to self-determination in this era of reconciliation. While dozens of Indigenous communities have signed varying forms of self-government agreements with the federal government, Indigenous Nations still face many obstacles along the path to true self-determination.

As a former Chief of Siksika Nation in southern Alberta, Leroy Wolf Collar dealt with many of the same problems other Indigenous Nations face across the country. From serious housing shortages to the lack of opportunities for youth, Chief Wolf Collar experienced the challenges and frustrations that come from operating in a colonial system still constrained by the Indian Act.

How do Indigenous Peoples move on from this defective system? Chief Wolf Collar identifies 17 issues that currently hinder Indigenous Nations—including broken treaty promises, problems with common forms of band administration, and the intrusion of provincial governments—along with potential solutions to overcome them.

This guide is for current and aspiring Indigenous leaders who want to increase their understanding of good governance, management, and leadership, as well as those who want to explore issues around Indigenous self-determination in Canada.

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128 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$23.95

Coming Soon
Let the People Speak: Oppression in a Time of Reconciliation
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Inuit; MĂ©tis;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Over the past fifty years, Canada's Indigenous Affairs department (now two departments with more than 30 federal co-delivery partners) has mushroomed into a "super-province" delivering birth-to-death programs and services to First Nations, Inuit and Métis people. This vast entity has jurisdictional reach over 90-percent of Canada's landscape, and an annual budget of some $20-billion. Yet Indigenous people have no means to hold this "super-province" accountable to them. Not a single person in this entity has been elected by Indigenous people to represent their interests. Not one. When it comes to federal Indigenous policy, ordinary Indigenous people in Canada are voiceless and powerless.

In Let the People Speak: Oppression in a Time of Reconciliation, author and journalist Sheilla Jones raises an important question: are the well-documented social inequities in Indigenous communities--high levels of poverty, suicide, incarceration, children in care, family violence--the symptoms of this long-standing, institutionalized powerlessness? If so, the solution lies in empowerment. And the means of empowerment is already embedded in the historic treaties. Jones argues that there can be meaningful reconciliation only when ordinary Indigenous Canadians are finally empowered to make their voices heard, and ordinary non-Indigenous Canadians can join with them to advance a shared future.

Educator Information
Includes a foreword from Sheila North. Sheila is from the Bunibonibee Cree Nation and is the former Grand Chief of the Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak (MKO), and former Chief Communications Officer for the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs. She is a former Gemini-nominated CBC journalist, former CTV journalist and documentarist.

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256 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$22.95

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Oneida-English/English-Oneida Dictionary
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

Oneida is an endangered Iroquoian language spoken fluently by fewer than 250 people. This is the first comprehensive dictionary of the Oneida language as used in Ontario, where most of the surviving speakers reside.

The dictionary contains both Oneida-English and English-Oneida sections. The Oneida-English portion includes some 6000 entries, presenting lexical bases, particles and grammatical morphemes. Each entry for a base shows several forms; illustrates inflection, meaning and use; and gives details regarding pronunciation and cultural significance. The English-Oneida entries direct the reader to the relevant base in the Oneida-English section, where technical information is provided. Completing the volume is a set of appendices that organizes Oneida words into thematic categories.

The Iroquoian languages have an unusually complex word structure, in which lexical bases are surrounded by layers of prefixes and suffixes. This dictionary presents and explains that structure in the clearest possible terms. A work of enormous precision and care, it incorporates many innovative ideas and shows a deep understanding of the nature of the Oneida language.

Reviews
"The format of the entries and the amount of information provided is impressive indeed. The system of cross-references connects entries to one another in a web of lexical relationships that brilliantly displays the nature of the Oneida lexicon – these entries are treasure-troves!" Hanni Woodbury, author of A Reference Grammar of the Onondaga Language

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1410 pages | 6.70" x 10.00"

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$150.00

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Peace and Good Order: The Case for Indigenous Justice in Canada
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

An urgent, informed, intimate condemnation of the Canadian state and its failure to deliver justice to Indigenous people by national bestselling author and former Crown prosecutor Harold R. Johnson.

"The night of the decision in the Gerald Stanley trial for the murder of Colten Boushie, I received a text message from a retired provincial court judge. He was feeling ashamed for his time in a system that was so badly tilted. I too feel this way about my time as both defence counsel and as a Crown prosecutor; that I didn't have the courage to stand up in the courtroom and shout 'Enough is enough.' This book is my act of taking responsibility for what I did, for my actions and inactions." -- Harold R. Johnson

In early 2018, the failures of Canada's justice system were sharply and painfully revealed in the verdicts issued in the deaths of Colten Boushie and Tina Fontaine. The outrage and confusion that followed those verdicts inspired former Crown prosecutor and bestselling author Harold R. Johnson to make the case against Canada for its failure to fulfill its duty under Treaty to effectively deliver justice to Indigenous people, worsening the situation and ensuring long-term damage to Indigenous communities.

In this direct, concise, and essential volume, Harold R. Johnson examines the justice system's failures to deliver "peace and good order" to Indigenous people. He explores the part that he understands himself to have played in that mismanagement, drawing on insights he has gained from the experience; insights into the roots and immediate effects of how the justice system has failed Indigenous people, in all the communities in which they live; and insights into the struggle for peace and good order for Indigenous people now.

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160 pages | 5.00" x 7.50"

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$25.00

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What Has No Place, Remains: The Challenges for Indigenous Religious Freedom in Canada Today
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

The desire to erase the religions of Indigenous Peoples is an ideological fixture of the colonial project that marked the first century of Canada’s nationhood. While the ban on certain Indigenous religious practices was lifted after the Second World War, it was not until 1982 that Canada recognized Aboriginal rights, constitutionally protecting the diverse cultures of Indigenous Peoples. As former prime minister Stephen Harper stated in Canada’s apology for Indian residential schools, the desire to destroy Indigenous cultures, including religions, has no place in Canada today. And yet Indigenous religions continue to remain under threat.

Framed through a postcolonial lens, What Has No Place, Remains analyses state actions, responses, and decisions on matters of Indigenous religious freedom. The book is particularly concerned with legal cases, such as Ktunaxa Nation v. British Columbia (2017), but also draws on political negotiations, such as those at Voisey’s Bay, and standoffs, such as the one at Gustafsen Lake, to generate a more comprehensive picture of the challenges for Indigenous religious freedom beyond Canada’s courts. With particular attention to cosmologically significant space, this book provides the first comprehensive assessment of the conceptual, cultural, political, social, and legal reasons why religious freedom for Indigenous Peoples is currently an impossibility in Canada.

Reviews
"There is no book that takes on the ambitious task that What Has No Place, Remains does, especially in the context of Canada and the Indigenous practices and beliefs linking Indigenous People to the land." - Michael McNally, Department of Religion, Carleton College

"Working at the intersection of religious, political, legal, and Indigenous studies, this book’s multi-disciplinary framework yields numerous insights, both analytically and prescriptively." - Greg Johnson, Department of Religious Studies, University of Colorado Boulder

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
Preface
A Comment on Terminology

Introduction: Colonialism and the Challenges for Religious Freedom

1. The Depth of Religious Freedom
2. Secularization, Dispossession and Forced Deprivatization
3. Religions Plus? Competing Frameworks of Indigenous Religious Freedom
4. Dealing with Diversity Poorly and the Gustafsen Lake Standoff
5. The Duty to Consult and Accommodate
6. The Potential and Limits of International Mechanisms of Redress

Conclusion: Challenges for Reconciliation

Notes
Bibliography

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Reconciliation in Practice: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
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Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

In 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission released a report designed to facilitate reconciliation between the Canadian state and Indigenous Peoples. Its call to honour treaty relationships reminds us that we are all treaty people — including immigrants and refugees living in Canada. The contributors to this volume, many of whom are themselves immigrants and refugees, take up the challenge of imagining what it means for immigrants and refugees to live as treaty people. Through essays, personal reflections and poetry, the authors explore what reconciliation is and what it means to live in relationship with Indigenous Peoples.

Speaking from their personal experience — whether from the education and health care systems, through research and a community garden, or from experiences of discrimination and marginalization — contributors share their stories of what reconciliation means in practice. They write about building respectful relationships with Indigenous Peoples, respecting Indigenous Treaties, decolonizing our ways of knowing and acting, learning the role of colonized education processes, protecting our land and environment, creating food security and creating an intercultural space for social interactions.

Perhaps most importantly, Reconciliation in Practice reminds us that reconciliation is an ongoing process, not an event, and that decolonizing our relationships and building new ones based on understanding and respect is empowering for all of us — Indigenous, settler, immigrant and refugee alike.

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Preface
Contributors
Introduction
Reconciliation: Challenges and Possibilities (Ranjan Datta)
Sámi Reconciliation in Practice: A Long and Ongoing Process (Irja Seurujärvi-Kari and Pirjo Kristiina Virtanen)
Reconciliation Through Decolonization (Colleen J. Charles)
Reconciliation: A White Settler Learning from the Land (Janet McVittie)
Integrating Indigenous Knowledge in Practice and Research: A New Way Forward for the Immigrant Health Professionals (Farzana Ali)
Reconciliation Through Transnational Lenses: An Immigrant Woman’s Learning Journey (Jebunnessa Chapola)
Letter to John A. Macdonald (Chris Scribe)
Reconciliation as Ceremonial Responsibility: An Immigrant’s Story (Ranjan Datta)
Reconciliation via Building Respectful Relationships and Community Engagement in Indigenous Research (Valerie Onyinyechi Umaefulam)
Reconciliation and New Canadians (Ali Abukar)
Holes and Gray (Khodi Dill)
References
Index

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Let Me See Your Fancy Steps: Story of a MĂ©tis Dance Caller
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; MĂ©tis;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; University/College;

“The Gabriel Dumont Institute Press is pleased to be able to preserve and share Jeanne Pelletier’s work and life story through Let Me See Your Fancy Steps—Story of a Métis Dance Caller. The Story of Jeanne Pelletier as told to Sylvie Sara Roy and Wilfred Burton. Jeanne’s achievement as the first female Métis dance caller is, of course, about Métis dance, but it is also about the determination of a young Métis girl who achieves her dream to become a dance caller during a time when this was only done by men.”

This resource includes dance calls for 16 dances and is accompanied by the instructional DVD All My Relations which features dance company V’ni Dansi which is led by renowned dancer and artistic director, Yvonne Chartrand.

Reviews
"The recounting of Jeanne’s work is supplemented throughout the book by testimonials of her former dance students and community members, all of whom praise the dance caller for the substantial impact that she’s had both on their personal lives, as well as the academic and social climates of the Métis community in Saskatchewan. As a Métis myself, I feel lost at times, as if my culture is fuzzy or foreign to me. Reading the life experiences, knowledge, and not to mention the wealth of Métis Jig steps found in this book gave me an overwhelming sense of peace to see research of this caliber and this level of care being invested in my culture. I would highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in Métis culture and the significance that the jig has to the culture. Anyone who has seen the Métis Jig performed live knows that it is a beautiful and awe-inspiring dance, but after reading Jeanne’s explanations of the cultural significance of the dances, I will now appreciate the dance that much more as a story and celebration of my culture. It is also worth mentioning that entire dance sequences are written out to follow with Jeanne’s notes, and the book includes an instructional DVD." - Ben Charles for SaskBook Reviews

Educator Information
Recommended by Gabriel Dumont Institute for Secondary/Post Secondary/Adult.

Includes a DVD.

Recommended in the Canadian Indigenous Books for Schools 2019-2020 resource list as being useful for grades 5-12 with regard to these subjects: English Language Arts, Physical Education, Social Studies, Teacher Resource.

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Lac Pelletier: My MĂ©tis Home
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; MĂ©tis;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Gabriel Dumont Institute Press is honoured to publish Cecile Blanke’s Lac Pelletier: My Métis Home. A prominent Métis Elder living in Swift Current, Saskatchewan, but with deep roots in nearby Lac Pelletier, Cecile has been a tireless presence on the Métis and larger cultural scene in southwest Saskatchewan for many years. The history of the southwest Saskatchewan Métis is not widely known, and this book contributes significantly to our knowledge of this community. With her vivid memories of Lac Pelletier’s local families and traditions, we are left with an enduring portrait of a caring Métis community which maintained close family ties and lived in harmony with Lac Pelletier’s flora and fauna. Cecile also chronicles the racism that the local Métis often faced and discussed how colonization made her and others question their Métis identity. With time and perspective, she overcame this self-hatred and became proud of her Métis heritage, becoming its biggest promoter in her region of Saskatchewan.

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Recommended by Gabriel Dumont Institute for these grade levels: Secondary/Post-Secondary/Adult

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Canadian Law and Indigenous Self‐Determination: A Naturalist Analysis
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

For centuries, Canadian sovereignty has existed uneasily alongside forms of Indigenous legal and political authority. Canadian Law and Indigenous Self-Determination demonstrates how, over the last few decades, Canadian law has attempted to remove Indigenous sovereignty from the Canadian legal and social landscape. Adopting a naturalist analysis, Gordon Christie responds to questions about how to theorize this legal phenomenon, and how the study of law should accommodate the presence of diverse perspectives. Exploring the socially-constructed nature of Canadian law, Christie reveals how legal meaning, understood to be the outcome of a specific society, is being reworked to devalue the capacities of Indigenous societies.

Addressing liberal positivism and critical postcolonial theory, Canadian Law and Indigenous Self-Determination considers the way in which Canadian jurists, working within a world circumscribed by liberal thought, have deployed the law in such a way as to attempt to remove Indigenous meaning-generating capacity.

Reviews
"Thought-provoking and robust, Canadian Law and Indigenous Self-Determination is likely to be a flag-ship in theorizing on indigenous-state relations. Gordon Christie situates himself squarely within the debates he describes and critiques, something that few legal theorists attempt. This book is remarkable in its originality and in my view a triumph." - Kirsty Gover, Melbourne School of Law, The University of Melbourne

"Clearly and carefully argued, Canadian Law and Indigenous Self-Determination is an original, analytically incisive, and important contribution to our understanding of the development of Aboriginal rights by the courts since 1982." - James Tully, Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Law and Philosophy, University of Victoria

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Introduction: A Journey in Making Sense

1. Setting the Stage
2. Canadian Law and Its Puzzles
3. Differing Understandings and the Way Forward
4. Remarks on Theorizing and Method
5. Problems with Theorizing About the Law
6. Liberal Positivism and Aboriginal Rights: Defining and Establishing ‘Existing’ Rights
7. Liberal Positivism and Aboriginal Rights: Making Sense of the Place of Aboriginal Rights in Canada
8. Postcolonial Theory and Aboriginal Law

Conclusion

Bibliography
Texts
Articles

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Settler City Limits: Indigenous Resurgence and Colonial Violence in the Urban Prairie West
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

While cities like Winnipeg, Minneapolis, Saskatoon, Rapid City, Edmonton, Missoula, Regina, and Tulsa are places where Indigenous marginalization has been most acute, they have also long been sites of Indigenous placemaking and resistance to settler colonialism.

Although such cities have been denigrated as “ordinary” or banal in the broader urban literature, they are exceptional sites to study Indigenous resurgence. T​he urban centres of the continental plains have featured Indigenous housing and food co-operatives, social service agencies, and schools. The American Indian Movement initially developed in Minneapolis in 1968, and Idle No More emerged in Saskatoon in 2013.

The editors and authors of Settler City Limits, both Indigenous and settler, address urban struggles involving Anishinaabek, Cree, Creek, Dakota, Flathead, Lakota, and Métis peoples. Collectively, these studies showcase how Indigenous people in the city resist ongoing processes of colonial dispossession and create spaces for themselves and their families.

Working at intersections of Indigenous studies, settler colonial studies, urban studies, geography, and sociology, this book examines how the historical and political conditions of settler colonialism have shaped urban development in the Canadian Prairies and American Plains. Settler City Limits frames cities as Indigenous spaces and places, both in terms of the historical geographies of the regions in which they are embedded, and with respect to ongoing struggles for land, life, and self-determination.

Contributors: Chris Andersen, Nicholas Brown, Elizabeth Comack, Heather Dorries, Nick Estes, Adam Gaudry, Robert Henry, David Hugill, Sharmeen Khan, Corey Laberge, Brenda Macdougall, Tyler McCreary, Lindsey Claire Smith, Michelle Stewart, Zoe Todd, Julie Tomiak

Reviews
Settler City Limits breaks ground, shattering the powerful authoritative structures of racism that have dichotomized rural and urban space, and Indigenous peoples’ relation to these as a central force sustaining and fortifying settler colonialism.” – Heather A. Howard-Bobiwash, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Michigan State University, and Affiliated Faculty Centre for Indigenous Studies, University of Toronto

Educator Information
Table of Contents

Introduction

Part 1 Land and Politics

Part 2 Contestation, Resistance, Solidarities

Part 3 Policing and Social Control

Part 4 Life and Death

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368 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authenticity Note: Contains contributions from both Indigenous peoples and settlers.

 

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An Act of Genocide: Colonialism and the Sterilization of Aboriginal Women
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Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

An in-depth investigation of the forced sterilization of Aboriginal women carried out by the Canadian government.

During the 1900s eugenics gained favour as a means of controlling the birth rate among “undesirable” populations in Canada. Though many people were targeted, the coercive sterilization of one group has gone largely unnoticed. An Act of Genocide unpacks long-buried archival evidence to begin documenting the forced sterilization of Aboriginal women in Canada. Grounding this evidence within the context of colonialism, the oppression of women and the denial of Indigenous sovereignty, Karen Stote argues that this coercive sterilization must be considered in relation to the larger goals of Indian policy — to gain access to Indigenous lands and resources while reducing the numbers of those to whom the federal government has obligations. Stote also contends that, in accordance with the original meaning of the term, this sterilization should be understood as an act of genocide, and she explores the ways Canada has managed to avoid this charge. This lucid, engaging book explicitly challenges Canadians to take up their responsibilities as treaty partners, to reconsider their history and to hold their government to account for its treatment of Indigenous peoples.

Reviews
"In An Act of Genocide, Karen Stote examines a controversial topic of which few Canadians are aware: the coercive sterilizations of Aboriginal women." - Morgran Grant

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Eugenics, Feminism and the Woman Question
Indian Policy and Aboriginal Women
Sterilization, Birth Control and Abusive Abortions
Settling the Past
Canada, Genocide and Aboriginal Peoples
Conclusion
References
Index

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Highway of Tears: A True Story of Racism, Indifference and the Pursuit of Justice for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

A penetrating and deeply moving account of the missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls of Highway 16, and a searing indictment of the society that failed them.

For decades, Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been found murdered along an isolated stretch of highway in northwestern British Columbia. The highway is known as the Highway of Tears, and it has come to symbolize a national crisis.

Journalist Jessica McDiarmid meticulously investigates the devastating effect these tragedies have had on the families of the victims and their communities, and how systemic racism and indifference has created a climate where Indigenous women and girls are over-policed, yet under-protected. Through interviews with those closest to the victims--mothers and fathers, siblings and friends--McDiarmid provides an intimate, first-hand account of their loss and unflagging fight for justice. Examining the historically fraught social and cultural tensions between settlers and Indigenous peoples in the region, McDiarmid links these cases to others across Canada--now estimated to number up to 4,000--contextualizing them within a broader examination of the undervaluing of Indigenous lives in the country.

Highway of Tears is a piercing exploration of our ongoing failure to provide justice for missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, and testament to their families and communities' unwavering determination to find it.

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From Where I Stand: Rebuilding Indigenous Nations for a Stronger Canada
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

An Indigenous leader who has dedicated her life to Indigenous Rights, Jody Wilson-Raybould has represented both First Nations and the Crown at the highest levels. And she is not afraid to give Canadians what they need most – straight talk on what has to be done to deconstruct the colonial legacy and achieve true reconciliation in Canada.

In this powerful book, drawn from Wilson-Raybould’s speeches and other writings, she urges us all – governments, Indigenous Nations, everyone – to build upon the momentum already gained in the reconciliation process or risk hard-won progress being lost. The choice is stark: support Indigenous-led initiatives for Nation rebuilding or revert to governments just managing “the problem.” Frank and impassioned, she also argues that true reconciliation will never occur so long as governments deny Indigenous Peoples their rights and the Indian Act continues to exist. Until then, we’ll be stuck in the status quo – mired in conflicts and expensive court cases that do nothing to improve people’s lives or heal the country.

The good news is that Indigenous Nations already have the solutions. Now it is time to act and build a shared future based on the foundations of trust, cooperation, good governance, and recognition. Removing the barriers that are keeping these solutions from being put into effect will not only empower Indigenous Peoples – it will enrich all Canadians and make Canada stronger.

From Where I Stand is indispensable reading for anyone who wants to dig deeper into the reconciliation process and know what they can do to make a difference, from engaged citizens and students to leaders and policy-makers, educators and academics, and lawyers and consultants.

Reviews
"From Where I Stand is a must-read book for all Canadians. Puglaas shares a clear understanding of where we have come from, the issues we must address, and the pathways to a transformed future. Having witnessed her remarkable courage and capacity as Canada’s attorney general and her determination to do what is right without succumbing to unrelenting political pressure, Puglaas stands tall among Canadians as a person for whom truth, thoughtfulness, and principle are not mere words – but values to sustain a different kind of policy and politics." - Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond (Aki-Kwe), Professor of Law, Allard Law School UBC, and Director of the Residential School History and Dialogue Centre

"Jody Wilson-Raybould's quest for justice has long driven her work. I first saw this when she was a law student and this commitment to justice has only been deepened by subsequent public service. Her unwavering commitment to reconciliation, balance, and good governance springs off every page of this book." - John Borrows, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law, University of Victoria Law School

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Foreword
Introduction

Moving through the Postcolonial Door
We Truly Have Come a Long Way ...
Idle No More and Recapturing the Spirit and Intent of the Two Row Wampum
On the Parallels, and Differences, between Canada and South Africa
Our Shared Histories and the Path of Reconciliation

Rights and Recognition
Self-Determination and the Inherent Right of Self-Government
Translating Hard-Fought-For Rights into Practical and Meaningful Benefits
UNDRIP Is the Start Not the Finishing Line
Defining the Path of Reconciliation through Section 35
Indigenous Rights Are Human Rights
Implementing UNDRIP

Governance in the Post-Indian Act World
Toppling the Indian Act Tree
First Nations Jurisdiction over Citizenship
Holding and Managing Our Lands
On Accountability and Transparency
Developing a New Fiscal Relationship
The Governance Toolkit and Building on Our Success

Building Business Relationships and the Duty to Consult
Economic Development Depends on Self-Government
First Nations Are Not a Box to Tick Off
Who Owns and Is Responsible for the Water?
On Certainty and Why It’s Elusive

Restoring Balance, Correcting Injustices, and Remaining Vigilant
A Litmus Test for Reconciliation Is the Status of Women
Preventing First Contacts with the Criminal Justice System
On Sticking Our Necks Out
On Obstruction, Denial, and Canada’s Failure to Uphold the Rule of Law
Each of Us, In Our Own Way, Is a Hiligaxste’

Acknowledgments
A Note on Terminology and the Speeches
Index

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Indigenous Peoples and Dementia: New Understandings of Memory Loss and Memory Care
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Dementia is on the rise around the world, and health organizations in Canada, the United States, and New Zealand are responding to the urgent need – voiced by communities and practitioners – for guidance on how best to address memory loss in Indigenous communities. This innovative volume responds to the call by bringing together, for the first time, research studies and Indigenous teaching stories on this topic. Using decolonizing methods, it addresses key areas of concern with chapters that:

  • examine the prevalence and causes of dementia, as well as the public discourse surrounding the issue
  • provide examples for incorporating Indigenous perspectives on care and prevention into research and practice
  • demonstrate culturally safe applications of research to Elder care.

Presenting strategies for health practice and effective collaborative research informed by Indigenous knowledge and worldviews, this book is a valuable resource for researchers, practitioners, students, and educators who seek a better understanding of memory loss and memory care.

This book will be of interest to students, educators, researchers, and practitioners working in or interested in the fields of dementia studies and Indigenous health.

Reviews
"This book represents the first significant contribution to what we know about how Indigenous peoples understand dementia and memory loss." -  from the foreword by Rod McCormick (Kanienkehaka), professor and British Columbia Innovation Council research chair in Aboriginal Health, Faculty of Education and Social Work, Thompson Rivers University

"A leap forward in understanding how health care can be provided in culturally safe ways." - Lloy Wylie, assistant professor, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University

Educator Information

Table of Contents
Foreword / Rod McCormick
Introduction / Wendy Hulko, Jean E. Balestrery, and Danielle Wilson
We Call It Healing / Secwepemc Elder, Wendy Hulko, Danielle Wilson, Star Mahara, Gwen Campbell-McArthur, Jean William, Cecilia DeRose, and Estella Patrick Moller

Part 1: Prevalence, Causes, and Public Discourse
1 Current and Projected Dementia Prevalence in First Nations Populations in Canada / Jennifer Walker and Kristen Jacklin
2 Indigenous Vascular Dementia: An Indigenous Syndemic Dementia Model / J. Neil Henderson, Linda D. Carson, and Kama King
3 A Story about Joe in the News Media: Decolonizing Dementia Discourse / Suzanne MacLeod
Coyote: Keeper of Memories / Danielle Wilson, Gwen Campbell-McArthur, Wendy Hulko, Star Mahara, Jean William, Cecilia DeRose, and Estella Patrick Moller

Part 2: Indigenous Perspectives on Care and Prevention
4 Perceptions of Dementia Prevention among Anishinaabe Living on Manitoulin Island / Jessica E. Pace, Kristen Jacklin, Wayne Warry, and Karen Pitawanakwat
5 The Understanding from Within Project: Perspectives from Indigenous Caregivers / Carrie Bourassa, Melissa Blind, Kristen Jacklin, Eric Oleson, and Kate Ross-Hopley
6 Oldest Age Does Not Come Alone: “What’s the Name of the Day?” / Mere Kēpa
A Fecund Frontier: We Listen ... in between Talk ... We Listen / Jean E. Balestrery and Sophie “Eqeelana Tungwenuk” Nothstine

Part 3: Applying Theory and Knowledge to Practice
7 Depression, Diabetes, and Dementia: Historical, Biocultural, and Generational Factors among American Indian and Alaska Native Elders / Linda D. Carson, J. Neil Henderson, and Kama King
8 Adapting CIRCA-BC in the Post-Residential-School Era / Barbara Purves and Wendy Hulko
9 Focus(ing) on Love and Respect: Translating Elders’ Teachings on Aging and Memory Loss into Learning Tools for Children and Youth / Wendy Hulko, Danielle Wilson, and Jessica Kent

Conclusion / Wendy Hulko, Jean E. Balestrery, and Danielle Wilson
Index

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MĂ©tis Politics and Governance in Canada
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; MĂ©tis;
Grade Levels: University/College;

At a time when the Métis are becoming increasingly visible on Canada’s political scene, Métis Politics and Governance in Canada offers a novel and practical guide to understand who the Métis are, how they govern themselves, and the challenges they face on the path to self-government.

The Métis have always been a political people. With the culmination of the North-West Resistance in 1885 and the hanging of their spiritual and political leader, Louis Riel, the Métis continued to take political action to give life to Riel’s vision of a self-governing Métis Nation in Canada.

Drawing on interviews with elders, leaders, and community members, Kelly Saunders and Janique Dubois reveal how the Métis have adapted their governance structures in accordance with their way of life as a distinct, rights-bearing Indigenous people. They look to the Métis language – Michif – to identify Métis principles of governance that emerged during the fur trade and that continue to shape Métis governance structures. Both then and now, the Métis continue to negotiate their place alongside federal and provincial partners in Confederation.

As Canada engages in nation-to-nation relationships to advance reconciliation, this book provides timely insight into the Métis Nation’s ongoing struggle to remain a free and self-governing Indigenous people.

This book will appeal to anyone interested in the Métis Nation and Indigenous self-government, including scholars in Political Science, Indigenous Studies, and Public Policy as well as government officials and the general public.

Reviews
"Métis Politics and Governance in Canada explores an aspect of Métis existence in Canada that has been neglected for far too long: the workings of contemporary Métis political organizations at the provincial and national levels. It is a must-read for anyone interested in Métis political organizing, leadership, representation, and the values inherent in Métis political activity." - Joe Sawchuk, co-author of From New Peoples to New Nations: Aspects of MĂ©tis History and Identity from the Eighteenth to the Twenty-First Centuries

"Unlike other academic works that simply look at the Métis Nation’s self-government as frozen in time and tied to 1869/70 or 1885, this book compellingly tells the “rest of the story” up to the present day. Uniquely, it also looks to the Métis Nation’s own language – Michif – to identify and understand key principles of Métis governance that continue to today. This book is essential reading for those who want to better understand the current state of Métis Nation self-government in Canada." - Jason Madden, co-managing partner of Pape Salter Teillet LLP

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Injichaag: My Soul in Story: Anishinaabe Poetics in Art and Words
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: University/College;

This book shares the life story of Anishinaabe artist Rene Meshake in stories, poetry, and Anishinaabemowin “word bundles” that serve as a dictionary of Ojibwe poetics. Meshake was born in the railway town of Nakina in northwestern Ontario in 1948, and spent his early years living off-reserve with his grandmother in a matriarchal land-based community he calls Pagwashing. He was raised through his grandmother’s “bush university,” periodically attending Indian day school, but at the age of ten Rene was scooped into the Indian residential school system, where he suffered sexual abuse as well as the loss of language and connection to family and community. This residential school experience was lifechanging, as it suffocated his artistic expression and resulted in decades of struggle and healing. Now in his twenty-eighth year of sobriety, Rene is a successful multidisciplinary artist, musician and writer. Meshake’s artistic vision and poetic lens provide a unique telling of a story of colonization and recovery.

The material is organized thematically around a series of Meshake’s paintings. It is framed by Kim Anderson, Rene’s Odaanisan (adopted daughter), a scholar of oral history who has worked with Meshake for two decades. Full of teachings that give a glimpse of traditional Anishinaabek lifeways and worldviews, Injichaag: My Soul in Story is “more than a memoir.”

Reviews
“This is the story of an Anishinaabe journey across time and space. This is more than an autobiography of trauma, it is a celebration of resilience.”– Margaret Noodin, Associate Professor, English and American Indian Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Invocation
Family Tree
Community Tree
Introduction
Section 1 Odinimanganikadjigan
Section 2 Nibinaabe
Section 3 Wikwedong
Section 4 Bimisi
Section 5 Miskwadesshimo
Section 6 Papawangani
Section 7 Migisiwiganj
Epilogue

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240 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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Distorted Descent: White Claims to Indigenous Identity
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Exposing the impacts of aspirational identity.

Distorted Descent examines a social phenomenon that has taken off in the twenty-first century: otherwise white, French descendant settlers in Canada shifting into a self-defined “Indigenous” identity. This study is not about individuals who have been dispossessed by colonial policies, or the multi-generational efforts to reconnect that occur in response. Rather, it is about white, French-descendant people discovering an Indigenous ancestor born 300 to 375 years ago through genealogy and using that ancestor as the sole basis for an eventual shift into an “Indigenous” identity today.

After setting out the most common genealogical practices that facilitate race shifting, Leroux examines two of the most prominent self-identified “Indigenous” organizations currently operating in Quebec. Both organizations have their origins in committed opposition to Indigenous land and territorial negotiations, and both encourage the use of suspect genealogical practices. Distorted Descent brings to light to how these claims to an “Indigenous” identity are then used politically to oppose actual, living Indigenous peoples, exposing along the way the shifting politics of whiteness, white settler colonialism, and white supremacy.

Reviews
Distorted Descent is a brave, original piece of scholarship, offered in the context of a politically sensitive and socially controversial subject of Indigenous identity. His research exposes the extent to which white settler colonialism undermines Indigenous rights through the theft of Indigenous identity. It’s a real wake-up call.” – Dr. Pamela Palmater, Chair in Indigenous Governance, Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University

“This is a timely and important study highlighting Canada’s historical literacy about who Indigenous people really are which, coupled with an exponential growth in interest in genealogical research and DNA tests that trace your ancestry, has supported the claims of white-Canadians to Indigenous ancestry." – Brenda MacDougall, Chair in Métis Research, University of Ottawa

Educator Information
Contents
Introduction: Self-Indigenization in the Twenty-First Century 
Ch. 1 Lineal Descent in an Age of Reconciliation
Ch. 2 Aspirational Descent: Creating an Indigenous Woman Ancestor 
Ch. 3 Lateral Descent: Reconstructing Indigeneity in the Past 
Ch. 4 After Powley: Anti-Indigenous Activism and Becoming Métis in Two Regions of Quebec 
Ch. 5 The Largest Self-Identified Métis Organization in Canada: The Métis Nation of the Rising Sun
Conclusion

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Invisible Generations: Irene Kelleher's Story of Living between Indigenous and White
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Irene Kelleher lived all her life in the shadow of her inheritance. Her local community in British Columbia's Fraser Valley all too often treated her as if she was invisible. The combination of white and Indigenous descent that Irene embodied was beyond the bounds of acceptability by a dominant white society. To be mixed was to not belong.

Attracted to the future British Columbia by a gold rush beginning in 1858, Irene's white grandfathers had families with Indigenous women. Theirs was not an uncommon story. Some of the earliest newcomers to do so were in the employ of the fur-trading Hudson's Bay Company at Fort Langley. And yet, more than one hundred and fifty years later, the descendants of these early pioneers are still waiting for their stories to be heard.

Through meticulous research, family records and a personal connection to Irene, Governor General award-winning historian Jean Barman explores this aspect of British Columbia's history and the deeply rooted prejudice faced by families who helped to build Canada. Invisible Generations evokes the Catholic residential school that Irene's parents and so many other ''mixed blood'' children attended. Among Irene's family and friends we meet Josephine, who was separated as a child from her beloved upwardly mobile politician father. When her presence in his socially charged household became untenable, Josephine was dispatched to the same Fraser Valley boarding school. ''The transition from genteel Victoria to St. Mary's Mission was horrendous,'' she wrote. Yet individuals and families survived as best they could, building good lives for themselves and those around them. Irene was determined to be a schoolteacher and taught across the farthest reaches of the province, including Doukhobor children at a time when the community was vehemently opposed to their offspring attending school.

Stories like that of Irene and of her family and friends have been largely forgotten, but in Invisible Generations Barman brings this important conversation into focus, shedding light on a common history across British Columbia and Canada. It is, in Irene's words, ''time to tell the story.''

Reviews
“B.C.’s preeminent historian, Jean Barman, honours the lives of those once disparaged as “half-breeds” and second class citizens. Irene Kelleher and her family persevered with dignity in the face of racism; their stories link us to the fur trade, gold rush and settlement of the province. Indeed, these Invisible Generations helped forge a modern British Columbia. They should be celebrated, not forgotten.”—Mark Forsythe, former CBC British Columbia broadcaster and co-author with Greg Dickson of From the West Coast to the Western Front: British Columbians and the Great War

“Irene Kelleher’s mixed-race ancestry, her adventures, her tribulations and her triumphs combine in this classic Jean Barman study, showing how the lives of ordinary people tell extraordinary truths about British Columbia’s culture and history.”—Michael Kluckner, author of Vanishing British Columbia and Toshiko

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Arrows in a Quiver: From Contact to the Courts in Indigenous-Canadian Relations
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Written in an accessible style and ideal for classroom use, Arrows in a Quiver provides an overview of Indigenous-settler relations, including how land is central to Indigenous identity and how the Canadian state marginalizes Indigenous people. Illustrating the various “arrows in a quiver” that Indigenous people use to fight back, such as grassroots organizing, political engagement, and the courts, Frideres situates “settler colonialism” historically and explains why decolonization requires a fundamental transformation of long-standing government policy for reconciliation to occur. The historical, political, and social context provided by this text offers greater understanding and theorizes what the effective devolution of government power might look like.

Reviews
“A useful introduction to Indigenous issues, especially for post-secondary students in Canada.” —Jonathan Dewar, co-editor of Cultivating Canada: Reconciliation through the Lens of Cultural Diversity

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Recommended for students in grade 12 or college/university.

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320 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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Performing Turtle Island: Indigenous Theatre on the World Stage
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Following the Final Report on Truth and Reconciliation, Performing Turtle Island investigates theatre as a tool for community engagement, education, and resistance.

Comprised of multidisciplinary and diverse perspectives, Performing Turtle Island considers theatre as a tool for community engagement, education, and resistance, and examines how communities in turn influence the construction of Indigenous identities through theatre.

Contributors:
Megan Davies (York University)
Spy Dénommé-Welch (Brock University)
Floyd Favel (Poundmaker First Nation)
Carol Greyeyes (University of Saskatchewan)
Michael Greyeyes (Muskeg Lake First Nation)
Kahente Horn-Miller (Carleton University)
Dione Joseph (Onehunga, New Zealand)
Catherine Magowan (Hamilton, ON)
Daniel David Moses (Queen's University)
Yvette Nolan (University of Saskatchewan)
Armand Ruffo (Sagamok Ojibway and Chapleau Cree Fox Lake First Nations, Queen's University)
Annie Smith (Grand Prairie Regional College)

Reviews
“Brilliantly introduces pedagogies that jump scale; a bundling project for future ancestors revealing knowledges for flight into kinstillatory relationships. ” —Karyn Recollet, co-author of In This Together: Blackness, Indigeneity, and Hip Hop

“An important resource for those who want to introduce or incorporate Indigenous artistic perspectives in their course or work. ” —Heather Davis-Fisch, author of Loss and Cultural Remains in Performance

“A very significant and welcome contribution to the growing body of work on Indigenous theatre and performance in the land now called Canada. ” —Ric Knowles, author of Performing the Intercultural City

Educator Information
Understanding Indigenous cultures as critical sources of knowledge and meaning, each essay addresses issues that remind us that the way to reconciliation between Canadians and Indigenous peoples is neither straightforward nor easily achieved. Comprised of multidisciplinary and diverse perspectives, Performing Turtle Island considers performance as both a means to self-empowerment and self-determination, and a way of placing Indigenous performance in dialogue with other nations, both on the lands of Turtle Island and on the world stage.

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256 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" | 5 photos, 1 table

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Zaagi'idiwin: Silent, Unquestionable Act of Love
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Oji-Cree;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Zaagi'idiwin: Silent, Unquestionable Act of Love, creates an intersection where viewers meet to understand and explore the essence of relationships, the meaning of connection/disconnection, and the pain of loss. Through the making and documentation of jingle dresses, Marshall explores the deeply personal stories that have shaped her perception of the complexities of her family history in the context of Canadian history. The social inequities, resistance, and sorrow communicated in this body of work serve as a springboard to examine the act of compassion and forgiveness, which ultimately helps to move forward to a new and more affirmative place of being.

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Eatenonha: Native Roots of Modern Democracy
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: University/College;

An exploration of the historical and future significance of Canada's Native soul.

Eatenonha is the Wendat word for love and respect for the Earth and Mother Nature. For many Native peoples and newcomers to North America, Canada is a motherland, an Eatenonha - a land in which all can and should feel included, valued, and celebrated.

In Eatenonha Georges Sioui presents the history of a group of Wendat known as the Seawi Clan and reveals the deepest, most honoured secrets possessed by his people, by all people who are Indigenous, and by those who understand and respect Indigenous ways of thinking and living. Providing a glimpse into the lives, ideology, and work of his family and ancestors, Sioui weaves a tale of the Wendat's sparsely documented historical trajectory and his family's experiences on a reserve. Through an original retelling of the Indigenous commercial and social networks that existed in the northeast before European contact, the author explains that the Wendat Confederacy was at the geopolitical centre of a commonwealth based on peace, trade, and reciprocity. This network, he argues, was a true democracy, where all beings of all natures were equally valued and respected and where women kept their place at the centre of their families and communities.

Identifying Canada's first civilizations as the originators of modern democracy, Eatenonha represents a continuing quest to heal and educate all peoples through an Indigenous way of comprehending life and the world.

Reviews
"Eatenonha is a unique interweaving of self, family, First Nation, and Indigenous peoples of the Americas and elsewhere." - John Steckley, Humber College

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Recording Their Story: James Teit and the Tahltan
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Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Tahltan (Nahanni);
Grade Levels: University/College;

Recording Their Story recounts the life and work of groundbreaking ethnologist James Teit and presents the key collections of Tahltan materials he gathered in the early 1900's.

Teit's connection to the Canadian Museum of Civilization and his ethnographic work among the Tahltan of northern British Columbia began in 1911. In two field seasons (1912 and 1915), with the participation of many Tahltan, Teit assembled a large and important collection of artifacts, photographs, song recordings and stories. Part biography and part catalogue of this collection, Recording Their Story reveals how the various threads of Teit's life and work came together in his final major ethnographic study.

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WĂ«nchikĂ neit Visions
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Wënchikàneit Visions is a collection of essays that explores the connection to place and history through the lens of absence, forgetfulness, and abandonment. The pieces and collection as whole turn to often overlooked physical spaces of the region around Waawiiyaatanong, and consider their central role in both its past and its future. The pieces are organized as visions occurring in regards to the moons from September (Hunters Moon) until February (Deep Snow Moon) and utilize traditional teachings and myths to contemplate these forgotten or abandoned places.

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70 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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In Those Days: Collected Writings on Arctic History Book 4, Shamans, Spirits, and Faith in the Inuit North
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Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: University/College;

In this new collection, Kenn Harper shares tales of Inuit and Christian beliefs and how these came to coexist—and sometimes clash—in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. During this period, Anglican and Catholic missionaries came to the North to proselytize among the Inuit, with often unexpected and sometimes tragic results. This collection includes stories of shamans and priests, hymns and ajaja songs, and sealskin churches, drawing on first-hand accounts to show how Christianity changed life in the North in big and small ways. This volume also includes dozens of rare, historical photographs.

Series Information
This in the fourth book in the In Those Days series, a historical series that collects writings on Arctic history.

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250 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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The North-West Is Our Mother: The Story of Louis Riel's People, the MĂ©tis Nation
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; MĂ©tis;
Grade Levels: University/College;

There is a missing chapter in the narrative of Canada’s Indigenous peoples—the story of the Métis Nation, a new Indigenous people descended from both First Nations and Europeans.

Their story begins in the last decade of the eighteenth century in the Canadian North-West. Within twenty years the Métis proclaimed themselves a nation and won their first battle. Within forty years they were famous throughout North America for their military skills, their nomadic life and their buffalo hunts.

The Métis Nation didn’t just drift slowly into the Canadian consciousness in the early 1800s; it burst onto the scene fully formed. The Métis were flamboyant, defiant, loud and definitely not noble savages. They were nomads with a very different way of being in the world—always on the move, very much in the moment, passionate and fierce. They were romantics and visionaries with big dreams. They battled continuously—for recognition, for their lands and for their rights and freedoms. In 1870 and 1885, led by the iconic Louis Riel, they fought back when Canada took their lands. These acts of resistance became defining moments in Canadian history, with implications that reverberate to this day: Western alienation, Indigenous rights and the French/English divide.

After being defeated at the Battle of Batoche in 1885, the Métis lived in hiding for twenty years. But early in the twentieth century, they determined to hide no more and began a long, successful fight back into the Canadian consciousness. The Métis people are now recognized in Canada as a distinct Indigenous nation. Written by the great-grandniece of Louis Riel, this popular and engaging history of “forgotten people” tells the story up to the present era of national reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

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In Our Own Aboriginal Voice 2: A Collection of Indigenous Writers & Artists in Canada
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Through our own Indigenous stories we discover our roots.

A collection of short fiction, memoirs, non-fiction, and poetry written by Indigenous writers from across Canada, plus original Indigenous artwork. This anthology contains the work of established authors such as the late Connie Fife, and up-and-coming Indigenous authors to watch out for (according to CBC Books) Joanne Arnott, Michelle Sylliboy, and Dennis Saddleman, as well as emerging writers from across Canada, who shine a light on the lives of Indigenous Peoples living in Canada.

"The time for our own stories has arrived, our own written words, our own voices. It is through our stories that we discover our roots." - Terri Mack, Strong Nations

Educator Information
The Indigenous selection committee comprised of librarians, educators, and administrators also included author Richard van Camp.

Foreword by former Chief Edmund Metatawabin, author of Up Ghost River: A Chief's Journey Through the Turbulent Waters of Native History.

Edited by Indigenous editor, Michael Calvert.

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6.00" x 9.00"

 

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Coming Soon
nĂźtisĂąnak
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

Lindsay Nixon's nîtisânak honours blood and chosen kin with equal care. A groundbreaking memoir spanning nations, prairie punk scenes, and queer love stories, it is woven around grief over the loss of their mother. It also explores despair and healing through community and family, and being torn apart by the same. Using cyclical narrative techniques and drawing on their Cree, Saulteaux, and Métis ancestral teachings, this work offers a compelling perspective on the connections that must be broken and the ones that heal.

Awards

  • 2019 Indigenous Voices Award short-listed
  • 2019 The Dayne Ogilvie Prize for LGBTQ Emerging Writers

Reviews
"A tremendous gift... unlike any other reading experience I've had" - Leanne Betasamosake Simpson 

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200 pages | 5.25" x 8.00"

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In Re-Print
Surviving Canada: Indigenous Peoples Celebrate 150 Years of Betrayal
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Surviving Canada: Indigenous Peoples Celebrate 150 Years of Betrayal is a collection of elegant, thoughtful, and powerful reflections about Indigenous Peoples' complicated, and often frustrating, relationship with Canada, and how--even 150 years after Confederation--the fight for recognition of their treaty and Aboriginal rights continues.

Through essays, art, and literature, Surviving Canada examines the struggle for Indigenous Peoples' to celebrate their cultures and exercise their right to control their own economic development, lands, water, and lives.

The Indian Act, Idle No More, and the legacy of residential schools are just a few of the topics covered by a wide range of elders, scholars, artists, and activists. Contributors include Mary Eberts, Buffy Sainte-Marie, and Leroy Little Bear.

Reviews
"Published to coincide with celebrations of the 150th anniversary of Canadian confederation, this insightful compendium of largely Indigenous voices challenges all Canadians to improve relations with and conditions for the continents First Nations Peoples. Poems, essays, interviews, song lyrics, and illustrations bring razor-sharp clarity to historic and contemporary issues, including the shameful history of residential schools, current reconciliation efforts, conflicts over resource development, and how best to confront legacies of racism and colonialism. The editors' aim to provide an accessible educational tool is well-served by coverage of diverse topics, including over-representation of Indigenous people in prison, land dispossession, and how social amnesia prevents progress. Equally impressive is the recovery of repressed histories, such as First Nation women's suffrage struggles, how the city of Winnipeg was built with stolen water, and the critical battle to preserve language rights. Contributors including the late actor Chief Dan George, singer-songwriter Buffy Saint-Marie, and a number of writers and activists, such as Erica Violet Lee and Helen Knott share feelings of anger and disappointment at past and ongoing injustices, as well as an incredible hope that insistent resilience that has marked Indigenous existence in Canada will help spark a new awakening for all Canadians." - Publishers Weekly

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464 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg: The Is Our Territory
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 9; 10; 11; 12; University/College;

In this deeply engaging oral history, Doug Williams, Anishinaabe elder, teacher and mentor to Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, recounts the history of the Michi Saagiig Nisnaabeg, tracing through personal and historical events, and presenting what manifests as a crucial historical document that confronts entrenched institutional narratives of the history of the region. Edited collaboratively with Simpson, the book uniquely retells pivotal historical events that have been conventionally unchallenged in dominant historical narratives, while presenting a fascinating personal perspective in the singular voice of Williams, whose rare body of knowledge spans back to the 1700s. With this wealth of knowledge, wit and storytelling prowess, Williams recounts key moments of his personal history, connecting them to the larger history of the Anishinaabeg and other Indigenous communities.

Reviews
"This book gives us an alternative perspective on historical record that is both personal and collective. Doug Williams reminds us of the generations of Indigenous knowledge keepers and of a history that stretches back prior to European contact-including the disruption of contact. This book is his gift to the Michi Saagiig and to all Anishinaabek. It is also a gift to Canadians who want to help decolonize this country. - Armand Garnet Ruffo

"Storytelling is not just a gift. It's not just an art. It's also a responsibility: the weaving together of history, philosophy, culture and humour frequently highlighting a culture's perspective on the world. Doug Williams has been doing this as long as I can remember. He lives the culture, not just talks about it. The people and places he talks about in Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg are more a part of our history then all the things going on in Ottawa." - Drew Hayden Taylor

Educator Information
Recommended in the Canadian Indigenous Books for Schools 2019-2020 resource list as being useful for grades 9 to 12 for Creative Writing, English Language Arts, Media Studies, and Social Studies.

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168 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

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Braiding Legal Orders: Implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

An examination of international, Indigenous, and Canadian constitutional law relating to the implementation of UNDRIP in Canada by leading Indigenous legal scholars and policy leaders.

Implementation in Canada of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) is a pivotal opportunity to explore the relationship between international law, Indigenous peoples' own laws, and Canada's constitutional narratives.

Two significant statements by the current Liberal government - the May 2016 address by Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett to the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues at the United Nations and the September 2017 address to the United Nations by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau - have endorsed UNDRIP and committed Canada to implementing it as “a way forward” on the path to genuine nation-to-nation relationships with Indigenous peoples. In response, these essays engage with the legal, historical, political, and practical aspects of UNDRIP implementation. Written by Indigenous legal scholars and policy leaders, and guided by the metaphor of braiding international, domestic, and Indigenous laws into a strong, unified whole composed of distinct parts, the book makes visible the possibilities for reconciliation from different angles and under different lenses.

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Preface | ix
Larry Chartrand, Oonagh E. Fitzgerald and Risa Schwartz

Introduction | 1
John Borrows

Part I: International Law Perspectives

1 The Art of Braiding Indigenous Peoples’ Inherent Human Rights into the Law of Nation-States | 13
James (Sa’ke’j) Youngblood Henderson

2 Using Legislation to Implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples | 21
Sheryl Lightfoot

3 Revitalizing Canada’s Indigenous Constitution: Two Challenges | 29
John Borrows

4 “We have never been domestic”: State Legitimacy and the Indigenous Question. 39
Joshua Nichols

5 Indigenous Legal Orders, Canadian Law and UNDRIP | 47
Gordon Christie

6 Bringing a Gendered Lens to Implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples | 55
Brenda L. Gunn

Part II: Indigenous Law Perspectives

7 Braiding the Incommensurable: Indigenous Legal Traditions and the Duty to Consult | 65
Sarah Morales

8 Mapping the Meaning of Reconciliation in Canada: Implications for Métis-Canada Memoranda of Understanding on Reconciliation Negotiations | 83
Larry Chartrand

9 Our Languages Are Sacred: Indigenous Language Rights in Canada | 93
Lorena Sekwan Fontaine

10 Navigating Our Ongoing Sacred Legal Relationship with Nibi (Water) | 101
Aimée Craft

11 Rebuilding Relationships and Nations: A Mi’kmaw Perspective of the Path to Reconciliation | 111
Cheryl Knockwood

12 Canary in a Coal Mine: Indigenous Women and Extractive Industries in Canada | 119
Sarah Morales

Part III: Domestic Law Perspectives

13 Beyond Van der Peet: Bringing Together International, Indigenous and Constitutional Law | 135
Brenda L. Gunn

14 UNDRIP and the Move to the Nation-to-Nation Relationship | 145
Joshua Nichols

15 Options for Implementing UNDRIP without Creating Another Empty Box | 153
Jeffery G. Hewitt

16 Asserted vs. Established Rights and the Promise of UNDRIP |159
Robert Hamilton

17 Articles 27 and 46(2): UNDRIP Signposts Pointing beyond the Justifiable-infringement Morass of Section 35 | 167
Ryan Beaton

18 Strategizing UNDRIP Implementation: Some Fundamentals | 177
Kerry Wilkins

19 UNDRIP Implementation, Intercultural Learning and Substantive Engagement with Indigenous Legal Orders | 189
Hannah Askew

Part IV: Concluding Thoughts

20 Implementation of UNDRIP within Canadian and Indigenous Law: Assessing Challenges | 199
Gordon Christie

21 Conflicts or Complementarity with Domestic Systems? UNDRIP, Aboriginal Law and the Future of International Norms in Canada | 207
Joshua Nichols and Robert Hamilton

22 UNDRIP as a Catalyst for Aboriginal and Treaty Rights Implementation and Reconciliation | 215
Cheryl Knockwood

23 The Necessity of Exploring Inherent Dignity in Indigenous Knowledge Systems | 223
James (Sa’ke’j) Youngblood Henderson

Contributors | 229
Artist Credits | 235

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252 pages | 7.00" x 10.00"

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Swampy Cree Justice: Researching the Ways of the People (3rd ed.)
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

Within this third edition, Dr. Hansen builds upon his exploration of the concept of Indigenous/ First Nations justice by incorporating discussions with three Omushkegowuk (Swampy Cree) Justice Committee members to the stories and explanations originally provided by the six Omushkegowuk elders indigenous to northern Manitoba. In so doing, Dr. Hansen provides an example of how the philosophy of Omushkegowuk justice, (a concept of justice undergirded, and impregnated with, a belief in education and healing), is being implemented in praxis.

While Dr. Hansen provides a narrative and comparative understanding of Indigenous justice based upon the Omushkegowuk experience, its message will most certainly resonate with other Indigenous groups as they deal with Western, state-funded, justice systems based upon retribution and punishment as such adversarial systems tends to be divisive for the community, ostracizing for the offender, and ignoring of victim needs.

Dr. Hansen provides the necessary background, from his own research and from government sources, information necessary to support his claims. Analysis utilizes the Four Directions and presents what Dr. Hansen refers to as an example of Indigenous Restorative Justice.

Reviews
"Dr. John Hansen gives us a comprehensive look into Omushkegowuk philosophy. Through his words, Wasekechak is returning to our stories to reanimate relationships and processes of restorative justice." -- Shawn Wilson, PhD, Member, Opaskwayak Cree Nation, Senior Lecturer, Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples, Southern Cross University

"Swampy Cree Justice: Researching the Ways of the People (3rd ed) is a must-read for First Nations peoples, policy makers, government, justice, police, and corrections officials. The book is based on Indigenous-based research conducted with Elders from the Opaskwayak Cree Nation (The Pas, Manitoba). According to the 1996 Royal Commission on Aboriginal People’s report, it was recommended that First Nations people had the right to develop their own Justice Systems based on their worldviews, cultural values, languages, and traditional customs. Dr. John G. Hanson has done an excellent analysis of what this looks like from Omushkegowak restorative justice model using a storytelling methodology. His critique of the current retributive and punishment Justice model is linked to the high incarceration rates of Indigenous peoples in Canada. Clearly there is a need to define the meaning, institutions, and standards of Justice in each First Nation across the country in order to address the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action in the Justice sector. It is time to occupy the field for the sake of balance and harmony." -- Herman Michell, PhD, Member, Barren Lands First Nation, External Consultant, Prince Albert Grand Council

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Dedication
Acknowledgement
Contents
Preface
1. Institutional Racism, Cultural Racism and Racist Practice
2. The Role of Stories in Indigenous Research
3. Justice
4. Cultural Implications when Conducting Indigenous Research
5. Historical Overview of Restorative Justice
6. A History of Indigenous Justice
7. Research Methodology
8. The Elders
9. An Indigenous Worldview
10. Presenting the Elders Knowledge
11. Data Analysis
12. The Organization of the Holistic Data Analysis – The Four Directions
13. Opaskwayak Restorative Justice Ideas and Practices
14. Conclusion
References
About the Author
Figures
Tables

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254 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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The Clean Place: Honouring Indigenous Spiritual Roots of Turtle Island
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Within Turtle Island Indigenous people know that its spiritual centre is the ultimate mover within everything we do and are surrounded by. The Clean Place: Honouring Indigenous Spiritual Roots of Turtle Island illuminates the strong connection Indigenous people have with the land and the importance of a paradigm shift worldwide toward sustainable ways of thinking and being. The voices and perspectives of the writers weave traditional teachings, spirituality, and messages of hope, change, and transformation.

Reviews
"Hankard’s compilation takes us on a journey throughout Turtle Island and beyond, across sacred oceans to the ancestral homelands of our relatives. This journey illuminates a connecting theme of Indigenous existence on, from and with the land as a sacred being. Upon a shared reading of a chapter with my son, it was clear he embodied the teachings within – he was doing his part in maintaining the Clean Place." - Cindy Peltier, PhD, Chair Indigenous Education Nipissing University

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Dedication
Acknowledgement
Gchi-Biimskogaabiwiding

Introduction
Michael Hankard

1. I Still Have the Place
Lorraine Rekmans

2. Unsettling the Clean Place: Beginnings of a Philosophical Reflection
Réal Fillion

3. Giving Thanks for the Light
Ross Hoffman

4. In Place and Time: Indigenous Women’s Re-Weaving and Resistances
Laura Hall

5. The Healing Journey: Spirituality, Cultural Connection and the Significance of Aboriginal Peoples Relationship to the Land
John E. Charlton & John G. Hansen

6. Honouring Papatuanuku: Honouring Mother Earth
Taima Moeke-Pickering

7. Stewards of the Sacred
Cynthia Landrum

8. A Buffalo’s Breath on a Cold Winter Morning
Michael Hankard

9. Wahi Pana: A Hawaiian Sense of Place and Relationship to the Land
Umi Perkins

10. The Land is One with Us, and We are One with the Land: A Personal Journal
Emily Faries

11. Caring for Past/Present/Future Through Anishinabe Photography on the Land
Celeste Pedri-Spade

12. Washed ‘Clean’ in Zimbabwe: The Dzivaguru Creation Story
Collis G. Machoko

13. Reflections on Urban Connections to Land and Ceremony: Uncovering the Virtues of Creativity, Cultural Resiliency, Flexibility and Tenacity
Barbara Waterfall

14. Biinidsa: Going Home to Clean Up
Kevin FitzMaurice

Epilogue: Clean Water in the ‘Clean Place’?
Maurice Switzer

About the Authors

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Portraits of the Far North
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

For over two decades, Manitoban artist Gerald Kuehl has travelled to the far-flung corners of Canada to draw out these answers from the last generation of Indigenous Peoples born on the land, and, pencil in hand, to record their likenesses and experiences. These Elders shared their gripping stories with him so that he might share them with the world.

Picking up where Kuehl’s acclaimed Portraits of the North left off, these pages follow the artist as he crosses the 60th parallel into Nunavut and the Far North, to meet the few Inuit Elders who still remember the days when their people lived entirely off the bounty of the land. The astonishing graphite pencil drawings and accompanying stories within—the result of Kuehl’s travels in Nunavut over thirteen years, hundreds of interviews with Elders, and thousands of hours at the drawing board—provide an unprecedented, poignant account of the changing realities Inuit experienced over the course of the last century, and their bright hopes for the future. These are tales of hardship and survival, of family and tradition, and of optimism and resilience. These are the faces and the voices of the Far North.

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240 pages | 10.25" x 10.50"

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Assembling Unity: Indigenous Politics, Gender, and the Union of BC Indian Chiefs
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Established narratives portray Indigenous unity as emerging solely in response to the political agenda of the settler state. But unity has long shaped the modern Indigenous political movement. With Indigenous perspectives in the foreground, Assembling Unity explores the relationship between global political ideologies and pan-Indigenous politics in British Columbia through a detailed history of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs. Sarah Nickel demonstrates that the articulation of unity was heavily negotiated between UBCIC members, grassroots constituents, and Indigenous women’s organizations. This incisive work unsettles dominant political narratives that cast Indigenous men as reactive and Indigenous women as apolitical.

This book will appeal to scholars and students of history, BC studies, and Indigenous studies, particularly those with an interest in gender and politics. It will also find an audience among Indigenous communities, activists, and political leaders.

Reviews
"Assembling Unity is a much needed resource that should be read by those wanting to learn about the historical issues BC Indigenous communities have faced – the same issues we continue to raise with current Canadian governments with little improvement." - Francyne Joe, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada and member of the Shackan First Nation

Educator Information
Related Topics: BC Studies, Indigenous Studies, Canadian History, Gender & Sexuality Studies, History, Regional Studies, Women's Studies.

Table of Contents

Beginnings

Part 1: Pan-Indigenous Unity
1 Unity: “United we stand, divided we perish”
2 Authority: “Ordinary Indians” and “the private club”
3 Money: “A blessing and a golden noose”

Part 2: A Philosophical Revolution and Competing Nationalisms
4 Refusal: “Empty words and empty promises”
5 Protest: Direct Action through “Militant May”
6 Sovereignty: “If you really believe that you have the right, take it!”

Reflections
Appendix
Notes
Bibliography
Index

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236 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" | 1 b&w photo, 2 maps, 3 tables 

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The Way Home
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

David Neel was an infant when his father, a Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw artist, died, triggering a series of events that would separate him from his homeland and its rich cultural traditions for twenty-five years. When he saw a Potlatch mask carved by his great-great-grandfather in a museum in Fort Worth, Texas, the encounter caused the aspiring photographer to wonder if he could return to follow in his father’s footsteps.

Drawing on memory, legend, and his own art and photographs, Neel tells the story of his struggle to reconnect with his culture after decades of separation and a childhood marred by trauma and abuse. David returned to the Pacific Coast, where he apprenticed with master carvers from his father’s village on Vancouver Island, and his career as an author and artist took him to the United States and to Mexico, to Europe and back again to British Columbia. Along the way, he met and photographed some of the most talented artists and Indigenous people of his generation. His travels helped him grow as a man and become an accomplished and prolific artist, but they also reconfirmed the healing power of returning home.

The Way Home is a testament to the strength of the human spirit to overcome great obstacles and to the power and endurance of Indigenous culture and art.

Educator Information
This memoir is a must-read for anyone interested in Canadian art and artists, particularly Indigenous art, as well as those learning about or active in cultural revitalization in Indigenous communities.

Subjects / Themes: Indigenous Art, Canadian Art, Memoir.

Additional Information
192 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$32.95

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