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Crowfoot (The Canadians Series)
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8;

When Crowfoot was born in 1830, the Blackfoot Confederacy was a powerful nation living free in the prairies. But as Crowfoot was growing up, earning a reputation for courage and wisdom, the Blackfoot way of life was disintegrating.

- Traders brought disease and liquor;
- The buffalo herds dwindled;
- Government incentives encouraged settlers to flock to the west.

Humiliated and bewildered, the Blackfoot had to accept government food rations in order to avoid starvation. Crowfoot, born to be a warrior but destined to become a peacemaker, was the Blackfoot spokesman in this time of crisis. Sensing that settlement was inevitable, and committed above all to peace, he encouraged cooperation with the government and the NWMP.

He persuaded other chiefs to sign treaty Number Seven, and refrained from supporting the Northwest Rebellion. The task of restraining a people who placed a high value on bold warfare was difficult, and Crowfoot's peaceful policies were sometimes unpopular with his own people. Nevertheless, he succeeded in preserving peace between two very different cultures. His success was due to his eloquence and diplomacy, and above all to his personal integrity.

As historian Carlotta Hacker observes in this thoughtful biography, "Crowfoot stood for courage, loyalty, patience, honesty, generosity - virtues that are as old as humankind."

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 10-13

Series Information
This book is part of The Canadians Series.

Additional Information
64 pages | 6.50" x 8.50" | Revised, 2nd Edition

Authentic Canadian Content
$8.95

In Re-Print
Encounter (Yolen)
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Caribbean; Taino;
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3; 4;

When Christopher Columbus landed on the island of San Salvador in 1492, what he discovered were the Taino Indians. Told from a young Taino boys point of view, this is a story of how the boy tried to warn his people against welcoming the strangers, who seemed more interested in golden ornaments than friendship. Years later the boy, now an old man, looks back at the destruction of his people and their culture by the colonizers.

Educator Information
Age Range: 6 – 9 years
Grade Level: 1 – 4

Notes on the historical basis for the text are appended.

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.00" x 11.00"

$11.50

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Far North (J.Reynolds)
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous European; Sami;
Grade Levels: 2; 3;

It's springtime in the Arctic, and Sara and Kari are excited about the yearly reindeer roundup. Their people, the Sami, are moving the reindeer herds to mountain pastures for grazing. Family and friends also come together to celebrate the end of the long dark winter.

Sara and Kari help their father gather the family's herd together. Like other Sami people in northern Europe, Sara and Kari's family relies on reindeer for food, clothing, and shelter. Once the reindeer are rounded up, Sara and Kari join their neighbors and participate in springtime festivities such as games and reindeer races. 

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

$11.95

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Fierce: Women Who Shaped Canada
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7;

Discover the untold stories of the fierce women who shaped Canada's legacy!

Celebrate the accomplishments and heroics of the overlooked heroes of Canadian history, with inspiring tales of ten women who were integral to our national legacy, and whose stories have not been told . . . until now!

Often relegated to the sidelines of history, the women highlighted in this book were performed feats that most people would never even dream of. You may not know their names now, but after reading their stories, you won't soon forget them.

It's time to hear the stories of Marguerite de la Roque, Ttha'naltther, Catherine Schubert, Charlotte Small, Alice Freeman (AKA Faith Fenton), Lucile Hunter, Ada Annie Jordan (AKA Cougar Annie), Victoria Cheung, Mona Parsons, and Joan Bamford Fletcher!

Author Lisa Dalrymple's riveting writing, combined with rigorous research, makes Fierce: Women Who Shaped Canada as eye-opening as it is thrilling to read!

Educator Information
Contains limited Indigenous content.

Recommended Ages: 9 to 12.

Additional Information
128 pages | 5.52" x 8.68"

Authentic Canadian Content
$16.99

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From Time Immemorial: The First Peoples of the Northwest Coast
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8;

From Time Immemorial provides an honest and up-to-date survey of the history of the coastal First Nations from pre-contact to the present. The culture of the coastal people was highly complex. Although there were many similarities, there were also many differences among the groups who shared the wealth of their life-sustaining environment.

This book provides a broad overview of traditional ways common to a large number of diverse groups. It encourages readers to learn more about particular groups who, long ago, walked the shorelines and forest trails of the Pacific Northwest.

Educator Information
From Time Immemorial has been recommended by the First Nations Education Steering Committee of BC as an “authentic First Peoples text that meets provincial standards and reflects First Peoples knowledge and perspectives in a respective way.

It has also been recommended by Literacy BC: “It’s easy to see why this text, which is accessible for fundamental level students, was also awarded the British Columbia 2000 Book Award.” Jan Weiten notes, “[This] is such an ambitious project. Both Diane and Joe Silvey have honoured the spirit and history of First Nations people, and they should be proud of themselves. This is definitely an asset to any classroom.

From Time Immemorial meets or exceeds all of the Learning Standards for the new BC Grade 3 Social Studies curriculum and the First Nations content for grades 4-8: 

  • Learning about indigenous peoples nurtures multicultural awareness and respect for diversity
  • People from diverse cultures and societies share some common experiences and aspects of life.
  • Indigenous knowledge is passed down through oral history, traditions, and collective memory.
  • Indigenous societies throughout the world value the well-being of the self, the land, spirits, and ancestors.

Recommended Grades: 3-8.

A teacher's guide for this book is also available: https://www.strongnations.com/store/item_display.php?i=141

Additional Information
92 pages | colour illustrations, photos, and maps 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$24.95

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Gaawin Gindaaswin Ndaawsii / I Am Not A Number
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

Dual language edition of powerful children's book about residential school experience reflects Indigenous language revitalization.

The dual language edition, in Nishnaabemwin (Ojibwe) Nbisiing dialect and English, of the award-winning I Am Not a Number. When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from, despite the efforts of the nuns who are in charge at the school and who tell her that she is not to use her own name but instead use the number they have assigned to her. When she goes home for summer holidays, Irene's parents decide never to send her and her brothers away again. But where will they hide? And what will happen when her parents disobey the law? Based on the life of co-author Jenny Kay Dupuis’ grandmother, I Am Not a Number is a hugely necessary book that brings a terrible part of Canada’s history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to.

Reviews
"Residential and boarding school stories are hard to read, but they're vitally important... books like I Am Not a Number should be taught in schools in Canada, and the U.S., too."— Debbie Reese, American Indians in Children's Literature

"It’s important to teach children about true Canadian history, but it’s not easy to talk about it in a way that children will understand. I Am Not a Number is perfect to get the conversation about residential schools started with your children. It opens the door for them to ask questions about the subject and the story is relatable in a way they can follow."— Residential School Magazine

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 7-11
Guided Reading: V

Dual-language: Nishnaabemwin (Ojibwe) Nbisiing dialect and English.

Subjects: Character Education (Empathy, Prejudice & Tolerance); History & Social Studies (Canadian History, First Nations & Indigenous Peoples); Government & Citizenship; Reflecting Diversity

Additional Information
44 pages | 8.50" x 11.00" | Translated by Muriel Sawyer and Geraldine McLeod with contributions by Tory Fisher

 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$14.95

Quantity:
Gabriel Dumont (The Canadians)
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; M├ętis;
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8;

Born in St. Boniface in 1837 of French and Indian parentage, Gabriel Dumont's childhood was spent in the Saskatchewan country, where he grew accustomed to the semi-nomadic existence of the Métis. These were the proud days of the Métis nation, when its people roamed freely throughout the Prairies. The most stable social institution was the annual buffalo hunt with its rules. When Gabriel Dumont became head of the Great Saskatchewan Hunt in 1862 the end of the nomadic lifestyle was already in sight.

As the buffalo herds dwindled, the Métis began to form more permanent settlements, but were alarmed when their pleas for recognition of their land rights were ignored by Sir John A Macdonald's government. Dumont appealed to Louis Riel, leader of the Red River Rebellion.

Riel spoke up for the Saskatchewan Metis, but their petitions were ignored. In 1885, the Métis took up arms against the government forces. Dumont spurred the outnumbered rebels to several victories. After the Métis defeat, Dumont fled to the United States where he spent time with Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show until an amnesty was declared and he was able to return to his home.

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of The Canadians Series.

Recommended Ages: 10-13 

Additional Information
64 pages | 6.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$8.95

Quantity:
Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 4;

Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump in Alberta is one of the oldest, largest, and best-preserved buffalo jump sites in North America and was declared a World Heritage Site in 1981. Author Gordon Reid has compiled a history of this significant site, describing the importance of the buffalo to Native peoples, how the jump was used, and the traditions and skills surrounding the hunt. He also looks at the excavation of the site, explaining how archaeologists uncovered artifacts, and what they learned about the history of the site and the people who used it. Also included is an overview of the resources offered by the Head Smashed-In Buffalo Jump interpretive centre.

This book, originally published in 1993, has been a very popular resource for tourists, educators, students, and people interested in Alberta's heritage. Completely updated and redesigned for this new edition, it will be the only book available that explains, in depth, the vital role of Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump in Native history.

Additional Information
48 pages | 8.00" x 8.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

Quantity:
Home to Medicine Mountain
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5;

Two young brothers are separated from their family and sent to live in a government-run Indian residential school in the 1930s—an experience shared by generations of Native American children throughout North America. At these schools, children were forbidden to speak their Indian languages and made to unlearn their Indian ways. Sadly, they were often not able to go home to their families for summer vacation.

Native American artist Judith Lowry based this story on the experiences of her father and her Uncle Stanley. Judith and author Chiori Santiago tenderly relate how Stanley and Benny Len found their way home by train one summer. Inspired by their dreams of home and the memories of their grandmother's stories, the boys embark on an adventurous journey from the harsh residential school to their triumphant welcome home at Susanville, California, in the shadow of Yo-Tim Yamne (Medicine Mountain).

Awards

  • American Book Award - Before Columbus Foundation
  • Skipping Stones Honor Award - Skipping Stones Magazine

Reviews
"The real-life experiences of Lowry's father and uncle fuel this account of two Native American brothers in California, sent to a government-run boarding school in the 1930s to unlearn their traditional ways. While the book discloses a sad chapter in the long history of the disenfranchisement of Native Americans, it will also resonate with any kid who has been homesick." - Publisher's Weekly

Educator Information
Guided Reading: N
Lexile: 520L
Interest Level: Grades 3 - 5
Reading Level: Grades 3 - 4

Additional Information
32 pages | 10.00" x 8.50"

Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$19.95

Quantity:
Honouring the Buffalo: A Plains Cree Legend
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

"A long time ago, Our People came from the Northern Woodlands to the Great Plains looking for food," Grandfather said. "They saw that the Buffalo lived in harmony with Mother Earth the same as Our People did."

Through the Creator, the buffalo gave themselves as a gift for the sustenance and survival of the Plains Cree people. The largest land animal in North America once thundered across the Great Plains in numbers of 30 to 50 million. They provided shelter, food, clothing, tools, hunting gear, ceremonial objects and many other necessities for those who lived on the Plains.

But by 1889, just over a thousand buffalo remained, and the lives of the Plains Cree people changed. The buffalo is honoured to this day, a reminder of life in harmony with nature as it was once lived. This is the story of how the buffalo came to share themselves so freely.

Educator Information
The text is in English and y-dialect Plains Cree.  Y-dialect Plains Cree translation by Randy Morin, Jean Okimasis, and Arok Wolvengrey.

Additional Information
48 pages | 11.00" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$14.95

Quantity:
I Am Not a Number
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;

When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from, despite the efforts of the nuns who are in charge at the school and who tell her that she is not to use her own name but instead use the number they have assigned to her. When she goes home for summer holidays, Irene's parents decide never to send her and her brothers away again. But where will they hide? And what will happen when her parents disobey the law? Based on the life of co-author Jenny Kay Dupuis’ grandmother, I Am Not a Number is a hugely necessary book that brings a terrible part of Canada’s history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to.

Awards

  • 2018 Red Cedar Award for Information Book Winner
  • 2018 Hackmatack Award Winner

Reviews
"Residential and boarding school stories are hard to read, but they're vitally important... books like I Am Not a Number should be taught in schools in Canada, and the U.S., too."— Debbie Reese, American Indians in Children's Literature

"It’s important to teach children about true Canadian history, but it’s not easy to talk about it in a way that children will understand. I Am Not a Number is perfect to get the conversation about residential schools started with your children. It opens the door for them to ask questions about the subject and the story is relatable in a way they can follow."— Residential School Magazine

"[A] powerful teaching tool that brings a terrible part of Canada’s history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to. It is written in simple language and told in a way that will stimulate conversations about residential schools and the traumatic effects they have had on generations of First Nation families and communities. ... beautifully illustrated by Gillian Newland. She captures the somber mood of the school, the anguish of the children, the severity of the nuns and the desperation of the family. Students can easily empathize with Irene and her brothers as well as their parents as they try to imagine how they would feel or act in a similar situation." — Alberta Native News, December 2016

"Endless cross-curricular connections can be made using this story. But the most powerful aspect of this book is that it will open a dialogue, one that Justice Murray Sinclair spoke of as head of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, a dialogue that needs to take place for reconciliation to happen." — ETFO Voice

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 7-11
Guided Reading: V

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$18.95

Quantity:
I Lost My Talk
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4;

I lost my talk
The talk you took away
When I was a little girl
At Shubenacadie school.

One of Rita Joe's most influential poems, "I Lost My Talk" tells the revered Mi'kmaw Elder's childhood story of losing her language while a resident of the residential school in Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia. An often quoted piece in this era of truth and reconciliation, Joe's powerful words explore and celebrate the survival of Mi'kmaw culture and language despite its attempted eradication.

A companion book to the simultaneously published I'm Finding My Talk by Rebecca Thomas, I Lost My Talk is a necessary reminder of a dark chapter in Canada's history, a powerful reading experience, and an effective teaching tool for young readers of all cultures and backgrounds. Includes a biography of Rita Joe and striking colour illustrations by Mi'kmaw artist Pauline Young.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$22.95

Coming Soon
I'm Finding My Talk
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Mi'kmaq;
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3; 4;

I'm finding my talk
And it may take some time,
But I'm learning to speak
In a language that's mine.

A response to Rita Joe's iconic poem "I Lost My Talk," and published simultaneously with the new children's book edition illustrated by Pauline Young, comes a companion picture book by award-winning spoken-word artist and Mi'kmaw activist Rebecca Thomas. A second-generation residential school survivor, Thomas writes this response poem openly and honestly, reflecting on the process of working through the destructive effects of colonialism.

From sewing regalia to dancing at powow to learning traditional language, I'm Finding My Talk is about rediscovering her community, and finding culture. Features stunning, vibrant illustrations by Mi'kmaw artist Pauline Young.

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$22.95

Coming Soon
If You Lived with the Iroquois
Authors:
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4; 5;

This book describes what life was like for the Iroquois hundreds of years ago.  By putting the reader in the empathetic position of posing the information as questions, the reader is drawn into the subject matter in a realistic and exciting way.  The reader discovers the rich culture of the Iroquois from their festivals, religion, education, work, and beliefs.

Educator Information
Ages: 7-10
Guided Reading: Q

Additional Information
80 pages | 9.03" x 7.45"

$9.99

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Indigenous Dwellings of Canada: A Colouring Book
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5;

Get ready to have fun and learn at the same time! Explore the many different homes and cultures of Turtle Island’s nations, past and present, throughout Indigenous Dwellings of Canada.

Each beautiful, black-line illustration includes carefully researched commentaries by Katherine and Leo Pettipas. Not only do they tell fun stories, but offer informative glimpses into Canadian history.

This educational colouring book is full of images and tales that will delight students and artists of all ages.

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$4.95

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