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Canadian Aboriginal Books for Schools K-7 2015-2016

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Books in this list are written by, published by, or are about/for Indigenous people. The list is published by The Association of Book Publishers of BC (ABPBC).


Shore to Shore: The Art of Ts'uts'umutl Luke Marston
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Salish; Coast Salish;

Stanley Park, Vancouver, September 2014. A fourteen-foot bronze-cast cedar sculpture is being erected. Dignitaries from all levels of government are present, including leaders of the Coast Salish First Nations and representatives from Portugal's Azores Islands. Luke Marston, carver/artist, supervises as his three-year project is revealed to the world.

The sculpture--titled Shore to Shore--depicts Luke's great-great-grandparents, Portuguese Joe Silvey, one of BC's most colourful pioneers, and Kwatleematt (Lucy), a Sechelt First Nation matriarch and Silvey's second wife. Silvey and Kwatleematt are flanked by Khaltinaht, Silvey's first wife, a noblewoman from the Musqueam and Squamish First Nations. The trio are surrounded by the tools of Silvey's trade: seine nets, whaling harpoons, and the Pacific coast salmon that helped the family thrive in the early industries of BC. The sculpture references the multicultural relationships that are at the foundation of BC, while also showcasing the talents of one of Canada's finest contemporary First Nations carvers.

Combining interviews, research and creative non-fiction narration, author Suzanne Fournier recounts Marston's career, from his early beginnings carving totems for the public at the Royal BC Museum, to his study under Haida artist Robert Davidson and jewellery master Valentin Yotkov, to his visits to both his ancestral homes: Reid Island and the Portuguese Azores island of Pico--journeys which provided inspiration for the Shore to Shore statue.

Authentic Canadian Content
$26.95

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Dipnetting With Dad
Artists:
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 1; 2; 3;

BUMP, BUMP - SLAP, river sockeye salmon are pulled onto shore!
Set in the beautiful landscape of the Cariboo Chilcotin region, DIPNETTING WITH DAD is a delightful and colourful story of a father teaching his son the Secwepemc method of fishing known as dipnetting. Together they visit the sweat lodge, mend the nets, select the best fishing spot and catch and pack their fish through rugged bush back to the family home for traditional preparation. In his first book, Williams Lake Indian Band member Willie Sellars captures family values, the importance of storytelling, community living and coming of age in one of BC's oldest cultures. Debut artist Kevin Easthope's contemporary and dynamic illustrations bring the characters to life as they jump off the page and pull you into their world.

Additional Information
48 pages | 9.84" x 8.58"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

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Discovering Numbers
Format: Board Book
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten;

Neepin Auger's books for children contain original, brightly coloured images and early education level concepts familiar to everyone. Playful and bold, this dynamic series will educate and entertain preschoolers, parents, and teachers alike.

In addition to the English words presented, the French and Cree equivalents are also given, making these some of the most dynamic and useful board books on the market, perfectly suitable for the classroom, library, and nursery.

Neepin Auger is a Cree artist, educator, and mother. Originally from the Bigstone Cree Nation in northern Alberta, she has been painting for over ten years, having studied art under her father, Dale Auger, a renowned First Nations artist and author of the award-winning children's book Mwâkwa Talks to the Loon: A Cree Story for Children.

Reviews
"Neepin Auger has created a simple board book that illustrates the numbers one to ten and includes the words in English, French and Cree. Bright, simple drawings attract the eye. The subjects are those familiar to Cree children but have universal application. This book and its companion Discovering Words will be useful in preschool and kindergarten classrooms, especially those introducing multiple languages." —Canadian Aboriginal Books for Schools, 2014-2015,October 2014

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of Neepin Auger's Discovering series.

Additional Information
12 pages | 6.50" x 6.50"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$8.00

Quantity:
Discovering Words
Format: Board Book
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten;

Neepin Auger's books for children contain original, brightly coloured images and early education level concepts familiar to everyone. Playful and bold, this dynamic series will educate and entertain preschoolers, parents, and teachers alike.

In addition to the English words presented, the French and Cree equivalents are also given, making these some of the most dynamic and useful board books on the market, perfectly suitable for the classroom, library, and nursery.

Neepin Auger is a Cree artist, educator, and mother. Originally from the Bigstone Cree Nation in northern Alberta, she has been painting for over ten years, having studied art under her father, Dale Auger, a renowned First Nations artist and author of the award-winning children's book Mwâkwa Talks to the Loon: A Cree Story for Children.

Reviews
"Neepin Auger's alphabet board book uses the same bright, simple style of illustration as the companion Discovering Numbers. English, French and Cree words accompany each illustration. Only the English words, in fact, follow the alphabet while the French and Cree words are translations. The pictures will be familiar to Cree children and provide a useful introduction to the other languages." Canadian Aboriginal Books for Schools, 2014-2015

Educator Information
This book is part of Neepin Auger's Discovering series, for ages 3 and under.

Additional Information
28 pages | 6.50" x 6.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$12.00

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Legends of Vancouver
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Legends of Vancouver was written at the turn of the last century and first published in 1911. The written collection of legends and myths was the result of a meeting, and later the fast friendship, between a Mohawk princess and a West Coast Squamish Chief.

Before her arrival on the West Coast, Pauline Johnson had acquired notoriety as a poet and performer and as an active proponent of Mohawk culture. That she was drawn to local legends was a natural extension of an already prolific career as a writer and stage performer. Retiring from the stage when she reached Vancouver in 1909, it was only right that she continue to share her stories. These were first published separately in a local newspaper and later published in book form. Johnson’s book of native legends quickly became a classic of Vancouver’s literature.

We can still detect to this day the joy of discovery that Johnson imprinted in her writing of the legends. Whether just arrived or long time residents, readers will share with Johnson emotions of discovery when seized, through her writings, by the beauty of the surroundings, just as she was 100 years ago. This book is also a portrait of a very young Vancouver with its much loved Stanley Park, its rough and tumble gold diggers and its millennium old First Nations.

Pauline Johnson’s tomb is set in Stanley Park, near Third Beach. In 1922, almost 13 years after her death, the City of Vancouver paid tribute to this magnificent artist and her legacy by erecting a monument in her honour.

This 100th anniversary edition combines a mix of modern and archival pictures of Vancouver to provide a sense of where these legends took place and how they are incorporated in the modern city.

Educator Information
Recommended for grades 4-12 English Language Arts and Social Studies.

Caution: Use of the terms “Indian” and “Redskins”.

Additional Information
148 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$15.95

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The Canoe He Called Loo Taas
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Haida;
Grade Levels: 2; 3;

Loo Taas is the amazing 50-foot canoe designed by legendary artist Bill Reid, and carved by members of the Haida community. Her name means "Wave Eater." This is the story of how she came to be through the eyes of the designer's daughter. This is the story of Loo Taas.

In 2009, Loo Taas was the alternative mode of transportation for the Olympic Torch while touring on Haida Gwaii. Elder Percy Williams was the torchbearer.

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$12.99

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