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A Day With Yayah
Format: Hardcover

Set in the Okanagon, BC, a First Nations family goes on an outing to forage for herbs and mushrooms. Grandmother passes down her knowledge of plant life to her young grandchildren.

Educator Information
Recommended for grades K-2 for the following subjects: Art Education, English Language Arts, Social Studies.

This resource offers a glimpse into the Nłeʔkepmx of the Nicola Valley in BC's Interior.  A glossary of Nłeʔkepmxcin words appears at the back of the book.

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.25" x 10.25" | colour illustrations

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$19.95

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Akilak's Adventure
Artists:
Charlene Chua
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Inuit;

When Akilak must travel a great distance to another camp to gather food, she thinks she will never be able to make it. With a little help from her grandmother’s spirit, and her own imagination to keep her entertained, Akilak manages to turn a long journey into an adventure. Even though she at first feels that she will never be able to reach her destination, she keeps her grandmother’s assurance that her “destination is not running away; it will be reached eventually” in mind and ends up enjoying the journey that at first seemed so daunting.

Reviews

Akilak’s Adventure is a worthy addition to school and public library collections.” — CM Magazine

“An engaging and recommended read-aloud for all collections.” — School Library Journal

Akilak’s Adventure has timeless teachings about responsibility and the importance of imagination to make it a worthwhile read now and always.” — CanLit for Little Canadians

Additional Information
32 pages | 9.00" x 7.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$10.95

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Blackflies
Authors:
Robert N. Munsch
Format: Paperback

Helen loves springtime - except for the gazillions of blackflies and mosquitoes. But she has a plan. . .

One day Helen wakes up and it's SPRING! The snow has melted and the sun is shining. But Helen knows that the blackflies will be coming out soon. So she does what any smart kid would do: she sends her little sister outdoors to check! When the blackflies and mosquitoes carry her away, Helen tells her dad, who rushes outside and is carried away himself. Now Helen needs to rescue BOTH of them, along with a wolf and a very clever bear. . .

Educator Information
Robert Munsch met Helen in Fort McMurray, where there are a lot of blackflies in the spring! Jay Odjick, an Algonquin artist, drew from his childhood experiences in illustrating this book: as a kid, he spent many hours indoors learning to draw as he hid from the blackflies and mosquitoes! Jay incorporated some First Nations decor and visuals to Helen's house and in his illustrations of her dad. Also fuzzy moose slippers, which he would love to own a pair of!

Recommended Ages: 3-8

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.01" x 9.95"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$7.99

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Coyote Tales
Artists:
Byron Eggenschwiler
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;

Two tales, set in a time “when animals and human beings still talked to each other,” display Thomas King’s cheeky humor and master storytelling skills. Freshly illustrated and reissued as an early chapter book, these stories are perfect for newly independent readers.

In Coyote Sings to the Moon, Coyote is at first the cause of misfortune. In those days, when the moon was much brighter and closer to the earth, Old Woman and the animals would sing to her each night. Coyote attempts to join them, but his voice is so terrible they beg him to stop. He is crushed and lashes out — who needs Moon anyway? Furious, Moon dives into a pond, plunging the world into darkness. But clever Old Woman comes up with a plan to send Moon back up into the sky and, thanks to Coyote, there she stays.

In Coyote’s New Suit, mischievous Raven wreaks havoc when she suggests that Coyote’s toasty brown suit is not the finest in the forest, thus prompting him to steal suits belonging to all the other animals. Meanwhile, Raven tells the other animals to borrow clothes from the humans’ camp. When Coyote finds that his closet is too full, Raven slyly suggests he hold a yard sale, then sends the human beings (in their underwear) and the animals (in their ill-fitting human clothes) along for the fun. A hilarious illustration of the consequences of wanting more than we need.

Educator Information
Recommended for Grades K-4 English Language Arts.

Additional Information
56 pages | 5.25" x 7.75"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$16.95

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Elisapee and Her Baby Seagull
Artists:
Charlene Chua
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Inuit;

When Elisapee’s father brings home a baby seagull, Elisapee falls in love with the bird right away. She feeds and cares for her new friend, named Nau, and even helps Nau learn how to fly! Nau grows, and grows, and grows some more, until she’s big enough to fly all over town and play with the other seagulls. Soon, it seems like Nau is ready to leave home for good, and Elisapee has to learn how to say goodbye. Based on the author’s childhood experience, this charming story about learning to care for animals will delight young readers.

Reviews
"Stories like Elisapee and Her Baby Seagull, which feature Inuit characters and communities in contemporary settings, allow young Inuit readers to see their own peers and neighborhoods represented in children’s books. They also allow young Canadians from other provinces to experience a vibrant part of our country that they might otherwise never be introduced to." - The Book Wars

Additional Information
40 pages | 8.75" x 8.75"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$16.95

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I Am Not a Number
Artists:
Gillian Newland
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg;

When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from, despite the efforts of the nuns who are in charge at the school and who tell her that she is not to use her own name but instead use the number they have assigned to her. When she goes home for summer holidays, Irene's parents decide never to send her and her brothers away again. But where will they hide? And what will happen when her parents disobey the law? Based on the life of co-author Jenny Kay Dupuis’ grandmother, I Am Not a Number is a hugely necessary book that brings a terrible part of Canada’s history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to.

Reviews
"Residential and boarding school stories are hard to read, but they're vitally important... books like I Am Not a Number should be taught in schools in Canada, and the U.S., too."— Debbie Reese, American Indians in Children's Literature

"It’s important to teach children about true Canadian history, but it’s not easy to talk about it in a way that children will understand. I Am Not a Number is perfect to get the conversation about residential schools started with your children. It opens the door for them to ask questions about the subject and the story is relatable in a way they can follow."— Residential School Magazine

"[A] powerful teaching tool that brings a terrible part of Canada’s history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to. It is written in simple language and told in a way that will stimulate conversations about residential schools and the traumatic effects they have had on generations of First Nation families and communities. ... beautifully illustrated by Gillian Newland. She captures the somber mood of the school, the anguish of the children, the severity of the nuns and the desperation of the family. Students can easily empathize with Irene and her brothers as well as their parents as they try to imagine how they would feel or act in a similar situation." — Alberta Native News, December 2016

"Endless cross-curricular connections can be made using this story. But the most powerful aspect of this book is that it will open a dialogue, one that Justice Murray Sinclair spoke of as head of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, a dialogue that needs to take place for reconciliation to happen." — ETFO Voice

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 7-11
Guided Reading: V

Additional Information
32 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$18.95

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Kisimi Taimaippaktut Angirrarijarani / Only in My Hometown
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;

The northern lights shine, women gather to eat raw caribou meat and everyone could be family in this ode to small-town life in Nunavut, written in English and Inuktitut.

Sisters Angnakuluk Friesen and Ippiksaut Friesen collaborate on this story about what it’s like to grow up in an Inuit community in Nunavut. Every line about the hometown in this book will have readers thinking about what makes their own hometowns unique. With strong social studies curriculum connections, Kisimi Taimaippaktut Angirrarijarani / ᑭᓯᒥ ᑕᐃᒪᐃᑉᐸᒃᑐᑦ ᐊᖏᕐᕋᕆᔭᕋᓂ / Only in My Hometown introduces young readers to life in the Canadian North, as well as the Inuit language and culture.

Angnakuluk’s simple text, translated into Inuktitut and written out in syllabics and transliterated roman characters, is complemented by Ippiksaut’s warm paintings of their shared hometown.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 3-7.

Recommended for Grades K-2 for the following subject areas: English Language Arts, Social Studies.

Additional Information
24 pages | 11.00" x 8.25"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$18.95

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My Heart Fills with Happiness
Format: Board Book
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

The sun on your face. The smell of warm bannock baking in the oven. Holding the hand of someone you love. What fills your heart with happiness? This beautiful board book, with illustrations from celebrated artist Julie Flett, serves as a reminder for little ones and adults alike to reflect on and cherish the moments in life that bring us joy.

International speaker and award-winning author Monique Gray Smith wrote My Heart Fills with Happiness to support the wellness of Indigenous children and families, and to encourage young children to reflect on what makes them happy.

Awards

  • 2017 Christie Harris Illustrated Children's Literature Prize winner

Reviews
"A quiet loveliness, sense of gratitude, and—yes—happiness emanate from this tender celebration of simple pleasures, which features a cast of First Nations children and adults...Short, first-person phrases...revel in both solitary and familial activities...Flett’s crisp-edged paintings blend universal and culturally specific experiences." — Publishers Weekly, Starred, November 2015

"Joyful and tender, this board book celebrates the activities that bring gladness through family and cultural connections...Flett’s quietly powerful gouache and digital collage illustrations emphasize the relationships between people...The sweet family story has universal appeal. A first purchase for all libraries." — School Library Journal, Starred, March 2016

"A celebration of aboriginal culture...but also universal in its message: sometimes it's the simplest things that lift our spirits highest...[The book] is beautiful in both its appearance and its intention." — Quill & Quire, March 2016

Additional Information
24 pages | 7.00" x 7.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$9.95

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Once in a Blue Moon
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

Inspired by the expression “once in a blue moon,” Danielle Daniel has created a book of short poems, each one describing a rare or special experience that turns an ordinary day into a memorable one. She describes the thrill of seeing a double rainbow, the Northern Lights or a shooting star as well as quieter pleasures such as spotting a turtle basking in the sun or a family of ducks waddling across the road.

In simple words and delightful naïve images, Once in a Blue Moon celebrates the magical moments that can be found in the beauty and wonders of nature.

With the same simple yet sophisticated design as Danielle’s award-winning picture book Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox, this book is a very accessible and inviting introduction to poetry for young readers.

Reviews
“This book will fascinate children expanding their horizons and learning about other cultures (or, in the case of Anishinaabe kids, their own).” - Kirkus Reviews

Educator Information
Recommended for Grades K-2 for these subject areas: Art Education, English Language Arts, Science, Social Studies.

Additional Information
56 pages | 8.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$17.95

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The Cloud Artist: A Choctaw Tale
Authors:
Sherri Maret
Artists:
Merisha Sequoia Clark
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Choctaw;

Born with the gift of painting with the clouds, Leona, a little Choctaw girl, uses the Oklahoma sky as her canvas to the delight of her people. When a traveling hawker hears about her talent and invites her to join the carnival, the Cloud Artist must make a decision about what kind of artist she wants to be.

Additional Information
32 pages | 10.75" x 8.75"

$23.95

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The Eagle's Path
Artists:
Audrey Keating
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Mohawk;

Anna explores what it means to be Mohawk, her own identity and the identity of others as she learns to follow the Eagle’s path. She learns how her culture has taught many generations to value honesty, wisdom and courage in their day-to-day lives. Anna also learns about two-spirit people when her best friend tells her that she likes other girls. This revelation leaves her full of questions, and with support from her wise and loving mother, she understands the value in accepting everyone for who they are.

A powerful story to share with children of all ages.

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$10.95

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The Owl and the Lemming
Artists:
Amanda Sandland
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Inuit;

As Owl swoops down and blocks the entrance to a lemming den, he is sure that he has a tasty meal in the little animal he has cornered. But this lemming is not about to be eaten! This smart little rodent will need to appeal to the boastful owl's sense of pride to get away. This fun and cheeky tale is accompanied by full-colour still photographs of custom-built characters on a hand-built set.

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$16.95

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The Sockeye Mother
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Gitxsan (Gitksan);

To the Gitxsan people of Northwestern British Columbia, the sockeye salmon is more than just a source of food. Over its life cycle, it nourishes the very land and forests that the Skeena River runs through and where the Gitxsan make their home. The Sockeye Mother explores how the animals, water, soil, and seasons are all intertwined.

1 SMALL FRY

There’s a strong undertow today. The turbulent waters caress the backs of the little semelparous life forms emerging from their gravel nests. A small free-swimming fry bears witness to the currents of spring, after spending weeks developing and using up its nutritious yolk sack. It’s one of few remaining fry leaving its long winter’s home to seek out nursing waters.

This is the time of Wihlaxs (the black bear’s walking moon), which is early spring to the Gitxsan peoples of the Pacific Northwest Interior. Change is in the air, the days grow longer, and renewal is the life force that guides the world around the little fry’s waterways. Flora cells are starting to stir, preparing to bud and bring green to the landscape. Stores of food for the people along Xsan (river of mists) is running low, but preparations for the new seasons of fishing and gathering have begun. New snow falls to take away the old snow, which the Gitxsan call dalugwa.

Miso’o, or sockeye, are one of many species of salmon that call Xsan home. Although all species are valued, the Gitxsan prefer the flavour and number of Sockeye that return to their spawning grounds every year. The cultures along Xsan, otherwise known as the Skeena River, flourished and shaped their existence around the life cycles of this keystone species. Little does this small sockeye fry know that its life cycle not only nourishes the people and other beings along the watersheds, it is the whole reason the forests and landscapes exist.

2 TIME TO GROW

After a couple of years of “schooling” in the deeper parts of the nursing lake, this sockeye has become a smolt. Its little silvery body begins taking the shape of its blue-backed future self. The smolt is outgrowing the lake, and this signals Lasa ya’a (the spring salmon’s returning moon), so the little sockeye begins its treacherous journey down the Skeena.

As the spring salmons return, the sockeye smolts depart to relieve their urge for saliferous waters. April carries summer innuendos, as warm winds flow through nearly blooming flowers. The scent of pines and cedar waft across moist pillowy moss. The nets and rods of the Gitxsan people scour Xsan in hopes of taking part in the return of ya’a, the spring salmon. Ceremony is held and feasts occur to welcome the runs of salmon who come to replenish the land. It’s not only a time to give thanks, but also a time to send prayer that the salmon will always return, that they will provide nourishment for all that is living within its realm.

The young sockeye has so far avoided predation, dodged the unnaturally changing landscape denuding from the clear-cutting of man, and escaped the hungry hands of ’watxs, the otter. The smolt and her school have made their journey to the Pacific, and north to the ocean waters, where they will continue to feed and grow.

3 A REPLENISHING DEATH

For two years the sockeye mother has been feeding in the ocean waters, while avoiding sharks and killer whales. Through instinct, smell and much that is still not understood, the sockeye mother swims against the powerful currents of Xsan to return to the exact place in the rivers where she was spawned.

It’s now Lasa lik’i’nxsw (the grizzly bear’s moon). August is the time when all the Gitxsan people and grizzly bears pluck hundreds of thousands of sockeye from the Skeena. Many predators such as the grizzly discard most of the carcass. They carry their catch sometimes hundreds of metres into the forest, only to eat the fatty bellies and eggs. The decaying bodies of the salmon leaves nitrogen that nourishes the soil.

Battered and beaten by the journey, she is literally decaying due to lack of food and constant hard work. She finds a male partner who’s dug a nest to her liking. She lays her eggs. She can now die a replenishing death. The dying salmon bodies become fertilizer for all the flora that shape the great lands. Without the sockeye mother, the Gitxsan as they are, would simply not exist.

Awards

  • The Science Writers and Communicators of Canada Award, Youth Category.
  • McNally Robinson Book for Young People Award

Educator Information
Recommended for Grades 4-7 for theses subject areas: Science, Social Studies.

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$23.00

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The Water Walker
Authors:
Joanne Robertson
Artists:
Joanne Robertson
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Atikameksheng Anishnawbek;
In 2018-2019, The Water Walker was an award recipient for First Nation Communities Read.

The story of a determined Ojibwe Grandmother (Nokomis) Josephine Mandamin and her great love for Nibi (water). Nokomis walks to raise awareness of our need to protect Nibi for future generations, and for all life on the planet. She, along with other women, men, and youth, have walked around all the Great Lakes from the four salt waters, or oceans, to Lake Superior. The walks are full of challenges, and by her example Josephine invites us all to take up our responsibility to protect our water, the giver of life, and to protect our planet for all generations.

Awards
- 2018-2019 First Nation Communities Read

Reviews
"An important topic is treated with grace, love, and a smidgen of humor in this delightful, necessary book." —Kirkus Reviews

"... a worthwhile addition to classroom and public libraries and a resource for discussions about First Nations and ecology." — CM: Canadian Review of Materials

"... like so many titles about Indigenous topics finally earning shelf space in Canadian libraries and bookshops, The Water Walker has just as much to teach parents as the children... Joanne Robertson succeeds in answering with her words and her art the same question that Nokomis Josephine answered with her footsteps: 'What are you going to do about it?'" — Anishinabek News

"The Water Walker is a wonderful book about conservation, environmentalism, and preservation, written in a way that even the youngest audience can understand why Nibi is important and why we should protect Nibi.... The book has the potential to be a highly interactive book around which science lesson plans could be formed. Students can discuss how they are protecting Nibi, they can write letters to Nokomis, and there can be discussion around the ways they can create change in the world, just as Nokomis did." — Resource Links

Additional Information
36 pages | 7.00" x 8.50"
Authentic Canadian Content
$16.95

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We Sang You Home
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Dene;

In this sweet and lyrical board book from the creators of the bestselling Little You, gentle rhyming text captures the wonder new parents feel as they welcome baby into the world. A celebration of the bond between parent and child, this is the perfect song to share with your little ones.

Internationally renowned storyteller and bestselling author Richard Van Camp teams up with award-winning illustrator Julie Flett for a second time to create a stunning board book for babies and toddlers.

Awards
- 2017 CCBC Best Books commendation

Reviews
"Both Van Camp's words and Flett's illustrations are economical, but We Sang You Home is not a quick read. Instead, each of the paired pages of text and illustration truly demands that the reader pause and reflect on the pages' contents. Highly recommended." — CM Magazine, June 2016

"The emotions of parenthood—including feelings of love, elation, and gratitude—are certain to be conveyed to [children] by the parents who share this tale with them. A lovely picture book that will resonate with parents and show young readers the profound, positive impact they have on their parents' lives." — School Library Journal, October 2016

"A great strength of this book is that it is nonspecific and inclusive enough to encompass all new babies—arriving through birth, fostering, or adoption—and it does not specify gender…The whole message is one of love, welcome, and completion now that the young one has joined the family. The eye-catching illustrations hint at a non-specific non-white race for the family (could be Asian, First Nations, Inuit, etc.), making this book inclusive and encompassing of Canada's ethnic diversity…It is a book of thankfulness and hope that would make a wonderful addition to the preschool collection in a library. Highly recommended." — Resource Links, October 2016

Additional Information
26 pages | 7.00" x 7.00"

Authenticity Note: The text and illustrations in this story are meant to appeal to and honour a variety of families, not only Indigenous families.

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$9.95

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