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Environmental Activism on the Ground: Small Green and Indigenous Organizing
Editors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Environmental Activism on the Ground draws upon a wide range of interdisciplinary scholarship to examine small scale, local environmental activism, paying particular attention to Indigenous experiences. It illuminates the questions that are central to the ongoing evolution of the environmental movement while reappraising the history and character of late twentieth and early twenty-first environmentalism in Canada, the United States, and beyond. 

This collection considers the different ways in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous activists have worked to achieve significant change. It examines attempts to resist exploitative and damaging resource developments, and the establishment of parks, heritage sites, and protected areas that recognize the indivisibility of cultural and natural resources. It pays special attention to the thriving environmentalism of the 1960s through the 1980s, an era which saw the rise of major organizations such as Greenpeace along with the flourishing of local and community-based environmental activism. 

Environmental Activism on the Ground emphasizes the effects of local and Indigenous activism, offering lessons and directions from the ground up. It demonstrates that the modern environmental movement has been as much a small-scale, ordinary activity as a large-scale, elite one.

Reviews
"Environmental Activism on the Ground succeeds splendidly in complicating and enriching our understanding of modern environmentalism. Focusing on Indigenous and non-Indigenous activists in an impressive range of settings, Jonathan Clapperton and Liza Piper draw together and interpret diverse methodological and conceptual insights in a way that gives new, deserved prominence to those who have strived—and continue to strive—for environmental justice at the local level. These accounts left me both enlightened and heartened. Scholars from across the humanities and social sciences will welcome this volume." - Richard A. Rajala, Department of History, University of Victoria.

Educator Information

Table of Contents:

Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: In the Shadow of the Green Giants: Environmentalism and Civic Engagements - Jonathan Clappeton & Liza Piper

Part 1: Processes and Possibilities
1. Strategies for Survival: First Nations Encounters with Environmentalism - Anna J. Willow
2. Native/Non-Native Alliances: Challenging Fossil Fuel Industry Shipping at Pacific Northwest Ports - Zoltán Grossman
3. Conserving Contested Ground: Soverigenty-Driven Stewardship by the White Mountain Apache Tribe and the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation - Jon R. Welch
4. From Southern Alberta to Northern Brazil: Indigenous Conservation and the Preservation of Cultural Resources - Sterling Evans
5. Parks For and By the People: Acknowledging Ordinary People in the Formation, Protection, and Use of State and Provincial Parks - Jesica M. DeWitt

Part 2: Histories
6. Alternatives: Environmental and Indigenous Activism in the 1970s - Liza Piper
7. Marmion Lake Generating Station: Another Northern Scandal? - Tobasonakwut Peter Kinew
8. Environmental Activism as Anti-Conquest: The Nuu-chah-nulth and Environmentalists in the Contact Zone of Clayoquont Sound - Jonathan Clapperton
9. Local Economic Independence as Environmentalism: Nova Scotia in the 1970s - Mark Leeming
10. “Not an Easy Thing to Implement”: The Conservation Council of New Brunswick and Environmental Organization in a Resource-Dependent Province, 1969-1983 - Mark J. McLaughlin
11. The Ebb and Flow of Local Environmental Activism: The Society for Pollution and Environmental Control (SPEC), British Columbia - Jonathan Clapperton
12: From Scoieal Movement to Environmental Behemoth: How Greenpeace Got Big - Frank Zelko

Afterword: Lessons from the Ground Up - Jonathan Clapperton & Liza Piper
Bibliography
List of Contributors
Index

Additional Information
752 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authenticity Note: Because this work includes contributions from Indigenous peoples, it has been labelled as containing Authentic Indigenous Text.

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$39.99

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Great Women From Our First Nations
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7; 8;

The book profiles ten outstanding women leaders in the Native community. All of these successful, trailblazing women are stellar role models who have raised the profile of indigenous culture in North America. From heroines of the past to women making new history today, this exciting work of nonfiction reminds readers of the extraordinary contributions of Native Americans to our daily lives.

Series Information
This book is part of the First Nations Series for Young Readers. Each book is a collection of ten biographies of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit women and men who are leaders in their fields of work, in their art, and in their communities. For ages 9-13.

Additional Information 
89 pages | 6.00" x 8.98"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$10.95

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I Am a Feminist: Claiming the F-Word in Turbulent Times
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

What is feminism? Why does it still matter? What exactly does intersectionality mean? In order to answer these (and many other) questions, I Am a Feminist first examines the history of feminism and then addresses the issues girls and women continue to face today. The book also looks at the ways in which people, especially young people, are working together to create a world where gender equality is a reality, not a dream. The author shares stories about the courageous individuals who have made a difference in the lives of women and girls worldwide. From suffragists to the #MeToo movement, I Am a Feminist encourages readers to stand up and speak out for equality and justice.

Educator Information
Young Adult Non-fiction

Contains a section on Indigeneity.

Themes: Feminism, Inequality, Activism, Relationships, Justice, #MeToo, Consent, Misogyny, #TimesUp

Additional Information
176 pages | 6.00" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$19.95

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Making Change: Tips from an Underage Overachiever
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7; 8;

Putting the fun back in fundraising!

Fundraising wunderkind Bilaal Rajan shares his tips for effective fundraising, using examples from his own amazing life to show how it can be done—and how you can have fun doing it. The second part of the book is a section entitled Eight Principles to Maximize Your Full Potential, which includes exercises to help you identify and attain your dreams.

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

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My Heroes Have Always Been Indians: A Century of Great Indigenous Albertans
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

In a series of inspirational profiles, Cora Voyageur celebrates 100 remarkable Indigenous Albertans whose achievements have enriched their communities, the province, and the world.

As a child, Cora rarely saw Indigenous individuals represented in her history textbooks or in pop culture. Willie Nelson sang “My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys,” but Cora wondered, where were the heroes who looked like her? She chose the title of her book in response, to help reflect her reality.

In fact, you don’t have to look very hard to find Indigenous Albertans excelling in every field, from the arts to business and everything in between. Cora wrote this book to ensure these heroes receive their proper due.

Some of the individuals in this collection need no introduction, while others are less well known. From past and present and from all walks of life, these 100 Indigenous heroes share talent, passion, and legacies that made a lasting impact.

Read about:

  • Douglas Cardinal, the architect whose iconic, flowing designs grace cities across Alberta, across Canada, and in Washington, DC,
  • Nellie Carlson, a dedicated activist whose work advanced the cause of Indigenous women and the education of Indigenous children,
  • Alex Janvier, whose pioneering work has firmly established him as one of Canada’s greatest artists,
  • Moostoos, “The Buffalo,” the spokesperson for the Cree in Treaty 8 talks who fought tirelessly to defend his People’s rights,
  • And many more.

Additional Information
240 pages | 5.90" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$24.95

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One Peace True Stories of Young Activists
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 2; 3; 4; 5;

Children can change the world.
One Peace celebrates the "Power of One," and specifically the accomplishments of children from around the globe who have worked to promote world peace. Janet Wilson challenges today's children to strive to make a difference in this beautifully illustrated, fact-filled and fascinating volume of portraits of many "heroes for today."

Canadian Craig Kielburger, who started Free the Children to help victims of child labor at the age of twelve, has been nominated three times for the Nobel Peace Prize. Farlis Calle, forced to identify the body of a young friend—a victim of her country's civil war—started the Columbia Children's Movement for Peace. At age ten, Kimmie Weeks, a refugee from the Liberian civil war, came within a whisper of being buried in a mass grave. Almost miraculously he survived and vowed to make a difference in the lives of other children. At thirteen he established Voices of the Future, Liberia's first child rights advocacy group. Other portraits feature the accomplishments of children from Sarajevo, Japan, the United Kingdom, Cambodia, Afghanistan and the United States. These moving testaments to the courage and initiative of youth will inspire readers young and old.

Awards
2011 Red Cedar Award nominee
2010 CCBC Best Books
2010 Rocky Mountain Book Award nominee
2009 Children's Literature Roundtables of Canada Information Book Award finalist
2009 Hackmatack Children's Choice Award nominee
2009 Information Book Award winner
2008 Smithsonian Notable Book for Children

Authentic Canadian Content
$19.95

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Protecting the Sacred Cycle: Indigenous Women and Leadership
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Salish; Coast Salish;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Xwulmuxw Slhunlheni (Indigenous Women) have, since time immemorial, played critical leadership roles in Indigenous communities. However, with the imposition of racist and sexist colonial policies, Indigenous women’s roles were systematically displaced. As a result of these policies, which formalized colonial governance systems, the vital informal leadership roles the Xwulmuxw Slhunlheni play rarely receive recognition. This book strives to honour the women in our communities who continue to embrace their important roles as givers of life and carriers of culture. This book reviews new ways to view Indigenous women’s leadership. Thirteen women from various Hul’qumi’num communities on Vancouver Island and the Mainland, share their thoughts on leadership and stress the importance of living our cultural and traditional teachings. A central theme for leadership emphasizes the importance of keeping the past, present and future connected – a Sacred Cycle that will ensure we bring our teachings forward for the future generations.

Foreword by Dr. Gwendolyn Point. Reviews by: Dr.’s Lelie Brown, Jeannine Carrière, and Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond.

Reviews
"Dr. Robina Thomas (Qwul’sih’yah’maht) eloquently and courageously models the leadership she explores in this book that honours the critical place of women in Indigenous culture, family and communities. She speaks back to the systematic displacement of Indigenous women that has occurred through colonization and at the same time offers us all hope. Whether Indigenous or not, whether a woman or not, the traditional teachings of Nuts’a’maat (we are all one) underpin true leadership. The women she learned from and who share their knowledge with us all in her book inspire a way forward. This book belongs in everyone’s home and office; its teachings belong in everyone’s life." - Leslie Brown, PhD, University of Victoria.

"Professor Thomas has gathered the wisdom of Indigenous women and leaders from her Nation as well as from across many Nations on Vancouver Island and British Columbia. The words and actions of these remarkable women are woven together in an account that takes us to the places we live as women and leaders—to building up the bonds of kinship, culture and ensuring the continuation of stories, teachings and wisdom. Professor Thomas is a bridge to understanding for the public and her fortunate students. The respect and gratitude she reveals for each woman’s path and contribution to the whole is apparent in every page. She makes her circle of friends and relations our circle, and leaves us with a deeper appreciation of the work underway rebuilding families and nations." - Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, Aki-Kwe (Cree/Scottish), Allard Hall Law School UBC, Former Judge and BC’s First Representative for Children and Youth.

"For the student this book will be a magical exploration of teachings about Indigenous women in leadership storytelling, personal location, Indigenous feminism and doing research that counts. For her colleagues Robina continues to teach us in a good way as a walking example of the meanings of ‘uy shkwaluwun’ or doing things with a good mind and a good heart. In my teachings that is the application of ‘all my relations’." -  Sohki Aski Esquao, University of Victoria.

Additional Information
147 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$27.00

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