Innu (Montagnais-Naskapi)

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Bathtubs but No Water
Authors:
Gerry Steele
Format: Paperback

In 1967, the Mushuau Innu — the Aboriginal people of Labrador — were resettled on Davis Inlet by the Canadian government. Originally a land-based people, this move to the coast created cultural, economic and spiritual upheaval, and Davis Inlet became synonymous with shocking substance abuse and suicide rates. In Bathtubs but No Water, Gerry Steele offers the reader a participant observer’s perspective on Davis Inlet. An employee of the federal government working with the Mushuau Innu since 1993, Steele explores their oral history of the resettlement process, substance abuse and deaths, and argues that these problems are a direct result of the government’s lack of respect for Aboriginal peoples. In 1992, the Innu tried to regain responsibility for their future, focusing on the traditions and strengths of their own community, but government bureaucracy would not support this partnership. Steele urges the government to engage in respectful partnerships with Aboriginal communities in order to achieve positive change.

$14.95

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I Am a Damn Savage; What Have You Done to My Country?
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

Quebec author An Antane Kapesh's two books, Je suis une maudite sauvagesse (1976) and Qu'as-tu fait de mon pays? (1979), are among the foregrounding works by Indigenous women in Canada. This English translation of these works, presented alongside the revised Innu text, makes them available for the first time to a broader readership.

In I Am a Damn Savage, Antane Kapesh wrote to preserve and share her culture, experience, and knowledge, all of which, she felt, were disappearing at an alarming rate because many Elders – like herself – were aged or dying. She wanted to publicly denounce the conditions in which she and the Innu were made to live, and to address the changes she was witnessing due to land dispossession and loss of hunting territory, police brutality, and the effects of the residential school system. What Have You Done to My Country? is a fictional account by a young boy of the arrival of les Polichinelles and their subsequent assault on the land and on native language and culture.

Through these stories Antane Kapesh asserts that settler society will eventually have to take responsibility and recognize its faults, and accept that the Innu – as well as all the other nations – are not going anywhere, that they are not a problem settlers can make disappear.

Additional Information
216 pages | 5.25" x 8.00" | Translation and Afterword by Sarah Henzi

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$22.99

Coming Soon
Walk With My Shadow: The Life of an Innu Man
Format: Paperback

Meet George Gregoire, an Innu man who was born in the Labrador bush in the middle of the last century, yet mustered enough education to write his memoirs. In the authentic voice of a storyteller George invites the reader to see Innu society and culture from the inside. He shares stories from his earliest childhood memories and the wondrous life of a hunter. George also became a husband and father and the story of his adult life is a mirror through which the images of a once independent people, under siege from the encroachment of a powerful and indifferent Canadian society, are tragically reflected. This is also a story of resistance and resilience, of a personal life and death struggle with alcoholism, as well as the desperate, brazen and occasionally triumphant struggles of a people to reclaim their culture and regain control over their lives and their homeland

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

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