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Haudenosaunee (Iroquois)

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Kayanerenkó:wa: The Great Law of Peace
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

Several centuries ago, the five nations that would become the Haudenosaunee—Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, and Seneca—were locked in generations-long cycles of bloodshed. When they established Kayanerenkó:wa, the Great Law of Peace, they not only resolved intractable conflicts but also shaped a system of law and government that would maintain peace for generations to come. This law remains in place today in Haudenosaunee communities: an Indigenous legal system, distinctive, complex, and principled. It is not only a survivor, but a viable alternative to Euro-American systems of law. With its emphasis on lasting relationships, respect for the natural world, building consensus, and on making and maintaining peace, it stands in contrast to legal systems based on property, resource exploitation, and majority rule.

Although Kayanerenkó:wa has been studied by anthropologists, linguists, and historians, it has not been the subject of legal scholarship. There are few texts to which judges, lawyers, researchers, or academics may refer for any understanding of specific Indigenous legal systems. Following the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and a growing emphasis on reconciliation, Indigenous legal systems are increasingly relevant to the evolution of law and society.

In Kayanerenkó:wa: The Great Law of Peace Kayanesenh Paul Williams, counsel to Indigenous nations for forty years, with a law practice based in the Grand River Territory of the Six Nations, brings the sum of his experience and expertise to this analysis of Kayanerenkó:wa as a living, principled legal system. In doing so, he puts a powerful tool in the hands of Indigenous and settler communities.

Contents

Part 1: Context
Part 2: The Nature of the Law: Principles and Processes
Part 3: Bringing the Great Peace
Part 4: The Constitution

Reviews
“Paul Williams’ Kaianerenko:wa The Great Law of Peace is the most comprehensive writing on Haudenosaunee law that I have ever read. As we move forward and work towards implementing the Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, works like this, will be an invaluable resource for engaging with Indigenous laws. Kaianerenko:wa The Great law of Peace should be required reading in all Canadian law schools.”— Sarah Morales

"This expansive book illustrates the living nature of Haudenosaunee law. Everyone interested in law's relationship to violence and peace should read it. Haudenosaunee law has the power to change the world."— John Borrows

Additional Information
472 pages | 6.75" x 9.75"

 

Authentic Canadian Content
$35.95

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Living on the Borderlines: Stories
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Both on and off the rez, characters contend with identity as contemporary Haudenosaunee peoples.

For the loosely connected Seneca community members living in Upstate New York, intergenerational memory slips into everyday life: a teenager struggles to understand her grandmother's silences, a family seeks to reconnect with a lost sibling, and a young woman searches for a cave that's called to her family for generations. With these stories, debut writer Melissa Michal weaves together an understated and contemplative collection exploring what it means to be Native.

Melissa Michal's work has appeared in The Florida Review, Yellow Medicine Review, and others. She currently teaches Native American/Indigenous literatures at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Reviews
“The stories in Living on the Borderlines cross bloodlines, heart lines, and cultural lines, powerfully charting what it is to be human in a world that works to divide us.” —Susan Power, author of Sacred Wilderness

Living on the Borderlines is a beautiful window into understanding Indigenous worldviews. Indigenous cultures think primarily in terms of space, and Western Europeans think in terms of time. Yet, Indigenous stories sharing original wisdom is how the first peoples of this land survived despite countless attempts to eradicate our race, culture, and way of life. This book is an unapologetic contemporary perspective of the truth of healing through Indigenous storytelling.”—Sarah Eagle Heart, CEO of Native Americans in Philanthropy

Living on the Borderlines is a hauntingly beautiful collection of stories of contemporary women and girls who live in the spaces between the reservations and traditional Indigenous territories and rural and urban communities stretching across western New York to the Blue Ridge Mountains, and beyond, to the island of Haida Gwaii off the coast of British Columbia. Despite the family choices, personal losses, intergenerational and historical traumas that separate Melissa Michal’s characters across time and space, both they and their stories are woven together by their ancestral bloodlines, spirits and voices that dance and dream, spelunk and sing them from the past, through the present, and into a resurgent future. Michal’s debut is a stunning achievement.”—Nikki Dragone, visiting assistant professor of Native American studies, Dickinson College

“Enlightening and thought-provoking, Michal’s stories are a pleasure to read and absorb.” —Booklist

Additional Information
250 pages | 5.25" x 7.50" | Cover art by Natasha Smoke Santiago

 

Authentic Indigenous Text
$25.50

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Sisters in Spirit
Authors:
Format: Paperback

Recounts, with documentation, the influence of the Iroquois model of freedom on women’s early struggle for freedom and equality in the United States. The revolutionary changes unleashed by the Iroquois-to-feminist relationship continue to shape our lives today. This book is used in many women’s studies courses at colleges and universities around the country.

$13.95

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