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Aboriginal Measures for Economic Development
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;

This volume explores Indigenous measures of economic development in First Nations Atlantic Canadian communities that are of relevance for First Nations peoples. Many of the challenges faced by these communities and their local, regional and national leaders in advancing economic development relate to experiences of diverse and complex issues — most of which clash with federal policies that increasingly call for centralization, standardization and uniformity. This volume illustrates the key challenges in establishing and maintaining socially responsible economic development that is beneficial for Aboriginal communities.

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$24.95

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Beau Dick: Devoured by Consumerism
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Accompanying an exhibition of Beau Dick’s work, this beautifully illustrated volume distills his powerful argument against our unsustainable way of living.

"With this body of work, Beau intended to launch his most overt critique of a system that he knew was unsustainable, in favour of a return to the cultural values of his people, and his profound generosity compelled him to share these values as widely as possible." - LaTiesha Fazakas

Beau Dick (1955 - 2017) was celebrated far beyond his hometown of Alert Bay, B.C., for both his political activism and his creation of striking, larger-than-life carved masks inspired by the traditional stories of the Kwakwaka'wakw. Dick's multi-faceted engagement with Kwakwaka'wakw culture included carving (which he learned from Northwest Coast artists such as Henry Hunt, Doug Cranmer, and Bill Reid), storytelling, and dancing.

As a high-ranking member of Hamat'sa, the prestigious Kwakwaka'wakw secret society centred on the story of a ravenous, man-eating spirit, Dick drew on all these art forms to create regalia for and participate in elaborate ceremonies that enacted Kwakwaka'wakw cosmology. Devoured by Consumerism shares nearly two dozen of these masks: vivid, unforgettable creations, made with traditional and contemporary methods and materials, depicting figures like Cannibal Raven, Nu-Tla-Ma (Fool Dancer), and Bookwus (Wild Man of the Woods).

Texts by LaTiesha Fazakas, John Cussans, and Candice Hopkins outline the stories that the masks depict, consider the inescapable parallels between Hamat'sa and the consumerism of capitalist society, and grapple with the philosophy that animates Hamat'sa - one that seeks to confront and, ultimately, master the voracious appetites inside us all.

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A useful book for the study of art and culture.

Devoured by Consumerism is Beau Dick's aesthetic response to Western capitalist values and an overt critique of the unchecked commercialism of capitalist society. The intention with this hardcover publication is to contrast the Kwakwaka'wakw economic and legal system of potlatching, which also functions as a way of maintaining and preserving oral history, again Western society's system of capitalism. The book references the Hamat'sa ceremony during potlatch, wherein the Hamat'sa cannibals' insatiable hunger and consumption is 'tamed' ritually through the dance. The power to control one's hunger is considered much greater than the power of hunger itself. This book works to critique the West's ravenous need to devour and consumer by presenting works that highlight this Kwakwaka'wakw worldview. 

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96 pages | 8.00" x 9.00" 

 

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$30.00

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Decolonizing Wealth: Indigenous Wisdom to Heal Divides and Restore Balance
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Decolonizing Wealth is a provocative analysis of the dysfunctional colonial dynamics at play in philanthropy and finance. Award-winning philanthropy executive Edgar Villanueva draws from the traditions from the Native way to prescribe the medicine for restoring balance and healing our divides.

Though it seems counterintuitive, the philanthropic industry has evolved to mirror colonial structures and reproduces hierarchy, ultimately doing more harm than good. After 14 years in philanthropy, Edgar Villanueva has seen past the field's glamorous, altruistic façade, and into its shadows: the old boy networks, the savior complexes, and the internalized oppression among the "house slaves," and those select few people of color who gain access. All these funders reflect and perpetuate the same underlying dynamics that divide Us from Them and the haves from have-nots. In equal measure, he denounces the reproduction of systems of oppression while also advocating for an orientation towards justice to open the floodgates for a rising tide that lifts all boats. In the third and final section, Villanueva offers radical provocations to funders and outlines his Seven Steps for Healing.

With great compassion--because the Native way is to bring the oppressor into the circle of healing--Villanueva is able to both diagnose the fatal flaws in philanthropy and provide thoughtful solutions to these systemic imbalances. Decolonizing Wealth is a timely and critical book that preaches for mutually assured liberation in which we are all inter-connected.

Reviews
“Edgar outlines with compassion and clarity thoughtful and practical steps toward aligning our money with our values. There are important lessons here for anyone working in finance or philanthropy.” —Keith Mestrich, President and CEO, Amalgamated Bank

Decolonizing Wealth is a must-read for philanthropists and donors looking to achieve the change we want to see in the world. Compelling, honest, and kind, Edgar is clear that we must free funding resources and the philanthropic sector itself from frameworks that further exacerbate the problems rather than bring us closer to identifying and activating the solutions.”—Alicia Garza, co-creator of Black Lives Matter Global Network, and Principal, Black Futures Lab

“Edgar has broken through the tired jargon of philanthropy-speak and written a fresh, honest, painful, and hopeful book, grounded in his own truths and Native traditions. He offers some radical thinking about what it would take to bring about a world where power and accountability shifted and communities controlled the resources vital to their strength and futures.”—Gara LaMarche, President, Democracy Alliance; former President, Atlantic Philanthropies; and former Vice President and Director of US Programs, Open Society Foundations

“Due to years of detrimental federal Indian policy and discriminatory economic systems, Native American communities have been marginalized and left out of the economic opportunity experienced by other Americans. Edgar offers a new vision and an Indigenous perspective that can put us on a better path. Everyone should read Decolonizing Wealth, especially those who control the flow of resources in government, philanthropy, and finance.”—LaDonna Harris (Comanche), politician, activist, and founder of Americans for Indian Opportunity

Decolonizing Wealth offers a refreshing and inspired look at how wealth can better serve the needs of communities of color and atone for the ways in which it has traditionally been used to inflict harm and division. Using a solutions-oriented framing, Edgar makes a solid case for how Indigenous wisdom can be used as a guiding light to achieve greater equity in the funding and philanthropic world.”—Kevin Jennings, President, Tenement Museum

“Finally, a Native perspective on how to heal internal systemic challenges. Decolonizing Wealth not only is an unflinching examination of today’s philanthropic institutions and the foundations upon which they were built but also offers critical wisdom applicable to many sectors.” —Sarah Eagle Heart (Lakota), CEO, Native Americans in Philanthropy

“We should all be grateful to Edgar Villanueva for helping us understand, by sharing Indigenous wisdom, that there is a path toward a more transformative approach to wealth, to investment, and to giving. We cannot truly call ourselves ethical, progressive, or mission-aligned investors until we have wrestled honestly with the fundamental issues raised in this book.”—Andrea Armeni, co-founder and Executive Director, Transform Finance

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216 pages | 5.56" x 8.50"

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$25.95

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Incorporating Culture: How Indigenous People Are Reshaping the Northwest Coast Art Industry
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Fragments of culture often become commodities when the tourism and heritage business showcases local artistic and cultural practice. And frequently, this industry is developed without the consent of those whose culture is being commercialized. What does this say about appropriation, social responsibility, and intercultural relationships? And what happens when local communities become more involved in this cultural marketplace?

Based on eighteen months of ethnographic fieldwork, Incorporating Culture examines how Northwest Coast Indigenous artists and entrepreneurs are cultivating more equitable relationships with the companies that reproduce their designs on everyday objects. Focusing on the vibrant Indigenous art industry in Vancouver, Solen Roth details how artists are slowly but surely modifying an essentially capitalist market to reflect Indigenous models of property, relationships, and economics.

Moving beyond the assumption that the commodification of Indigenous culture is necessarily exploitative, Incorporating Culture discusses how communities can treat culture as a resource in a way that nurtures rather than depletes it. From this fresh perspective, Roth sheds light on the processes by which Indigenous people have been asserting control over the Northwest Coast art industry – not by shutting the market down but by reshaping it in order to reflect their communities’ values and ways of life.

Scholars and students in a broad range of disciplines who are interested in the relationship between commerce and Indigenous art and design will find this book illuminating, as will thoughtful participants in the Indigenous art market.

Reviews
"Roth takes a refreshing approach to Northwest Coast art. It does not privilege the historical, nor the fine art market or ceremonial art. Rather, Roth takes seriously the artware made to leave Indigenous communities. She makes a compelling case for reframing the ‘souvenir’ art market on the Pacific Coast as ‘culturally modified capitalism,’ in which Indigenous stakeholders actively shape this industry in locally meaningful ways through intensive engagement with provincial, federal, and global systems." - Cara Krmpotich, associate professor, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

"There is no other book on Native American art like Incorporating Culture. It brings forward new and fascinating perspectives on the myriad examples of Northwest Coast First Nations artware seen in shops, revealing the strength of Northwest Coast values and practices as they penetrate and influence what might be seen from the outside as a strictly capitalist venture." - Aldona Jonaitis, director, University of Alaska Museum of the North

Educator Information
Useful for these subject areas: Indigenous Studies, Art History, Cultural Studies, Anthropology, Indigenous Art

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240 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$32.95

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Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis; Inuit; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Indigenous perspectives much older than the nation itself shared through maps, artwork, history and culture.

The Royal Canadian Geographical Society, in partnership with Canada's national Indigenous organizations, has created a groundbreaking four-volume atlas that shares the experiences, perspectives, and histories of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. It's an ambitious and unprecedented project inspired by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Action. Exploring themes of language, demographics, economy, environment and culture, with in-depth coverage of treaties and residential schools, these are stories of Canada's Indigenous Peoples, told in detailed maps and rich narratives.

This extraordinary project offers Canada a step on the path toward understanding.

The volumes contain more than 48 pages of reference maps, content from more than 50 Indigenous writers; hundreds of historical and contemporary photographs and a glossary of Indigenous terms, timelines, map of Indigenous languages, and frequently asked questions. All packaged together in a beautifully designed protective slipcase.

Educator Information
Recommended for ages 13+.

The Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada includes a four volume print atlas, an online atlas, an app, and more!

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322 pages | 10.50" x 12.87"

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$83.00

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Indigenous Relations: Insights, Tips & Suggestions to Make Reconciliation a Reality
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Inuit; Métis;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Indigenous Relations: Your Guide to Working Effectively with First Nations, Metis, and Inuit.

A timely sequel to the bestselling 21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act - and an invaluable guide for anyone seeking to work more effectively with Indigenous Peoples.

We are all treaty people. But what are the everyday impacts of treaties, and how can we effectively work toward reconciliation if we're worried our words and actions will unintentionally cause harm?

Hereditary chief and leading Indigenous relations trainer Bob Joseph is your guide to respecting cultural differences and improving your personal relationships and business interactions with Indigenous Peoples. Practical and inclusive, Indigenous Relations interprets the difference between hereditary and elected leadership, and why it matters; explains the intricacies of Aboriginal Rights and Title, and the treaty process; and demonstrates the lasting impact of the Indian Act, including the barriers that Indigenous communities face and the truth behind common myths and stereotypes perpetuated since Confederation.

Indigenous Relations equips you with the necessary knowledge to respectfully avoid missteps in your work and daily life, and offers an eight-part process to help business and government work more effectively with Indigenous Peoples - benefitting workplace culture as well as the bottom line. Indigenous Relations is an invaluable tool for anyone who wants to improve their cultural competency and undo the legacy of the Indian Act

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200 pages | 8.00" x 5.00"

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$19.95

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Indigenous Tourism Movements
Editors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Cultural tourism is frequently marketed as an economic panacea for communities whose traditional ways of life have been compromised by the dominant societies by which they have been colonized. Indigenous communities in particular are responding to these opportunities in innovative ways that set them apart from their non-Indigenous predecessors and competitors. 

Indigenous Tourism Movements explores Indigenous identity using “movement” as a metaphor, drawing on case studies from throughout the world including Botswana, Canada, Chile, Panama, Tanzania, and the United States.

Editors Alexis C.Bunten and Nelson Graburn, along with a diverse group of contributors,  frame tourism as a critical lens to explore the shifting identity politics of Indigeneity in relation to heritage, global policy, and development. They juxtapose diverse expressions of identity – from the commodification of Indigenous culture to the performance of heritage for tourists – to illuminate the complex local, national, and transnational connections these expressions produce. 

Indigenous Tourism Movements is a sophisticated, sensitive, and refreshingly frank examination of Indigeneity in the contemporary world.

Educator Information

TABLE OF CONTENTS
List of Figures
Notes on Contributors
Acknowledgments
Preface
1. Current Themes in Indigenous Tourism, Alexis Celeste Bunten and Nelson H.H. Graburn
PART 1: IDENTITY MOVEMENTS
1. Deriding Demand: A Case Study of Indigenous Imaginaries at an Australian Aboriginal Tourism Cultural Park, Alexis Celeste Bunten
2. The Masaai as paradoxical icons of tourism (im)mobility, Noel Salazar
3. The Alchemy of Tourism: From Stereotype and Marginalizing Discourse to Real in the Space of Tourist Performance, Karen Stocker
PART II: POLITICAL MOVEMENTS
1. Indigenous tourism as a transformative process: the case of the Embera in Panama, Dimitrios Theodossopoulos
2. San Cultural Tourism: Mobilizing Indigenous Agency in Botswana, Rachel Giraudo
3. The Commodification of Authenticity: Performing and Displaying Dogon Material Identity, Laurence Douny
PART III: KNOWLEDGE MOVEMENTS
1. Streams of Tourists: Navigating the Tourist Tides in Late 19th Century Southeast Alaska, Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse
2. Experiments in Inuit Tourism: The Eastern Canadian Arctic, Nelson H.H. Graburn
3. Beyond Neoliberalism and Nature: Territoriality, Relational Ontologies and Hybridity in a Tourism Initiative in Alto Bio Bio, Chile, Marcela Palomino-Schalscha
Epilogue

Reviews
"Indigenous Tourism Movements is a major contribution to research. It provides insightful case studies based on longitudinal, immersive field work that spans decades. Thoroughly informed by the relevant literature and theoretical insights, Indigenous Tourism Movements will be well received by academics and students of anthropology, geography, and cultural and tourism studies." - Anna Carr, Department of Tourism, University of Otago

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288 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

$32.95

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Indivisible: Indigenous Human Rights
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Indigenous rights are generally conceptualized and advocated separately from the human rights framework. The contributors to Indivisible: Indigenous Human Rights, however, deftly and powerfully argue that Indigenous rights are in fact human rights and that the fundamental human rights of Indigenous people cannot be protected without the inclusion of their Indigenous rights, which are suppressed and oppressed by the forces of racism and colonialism. Drawing on a wealth of experience and blending critical theoretical frameworks and a close knowledge of domestic and international law on human rights, the authors in this collection show that settler states such as Canada persist in violating and failing to acknowledge Indigenous human rights. Furthermore, settler states are obligated to respect and animate these rights, despite the evident tensions in political and economic interests between elite capitalists, settler citizens and Indigenous peoples.

Reviews
“The historic and contemporary challenges faced by Indigenous peoples, be it the tragedy of residential schools, high levels of violence against women, abusive policing, struggles around land and resources, or entrenched poverty are reflective of the disgraceful failure of Canada and other states to uphold human rights. Indivisible is a critical call to governments and Indigenous peoples to take up the indivisible framework of rights protection enshrined in the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.” — Alex Neve, Amnesty International

“Well written, fast moving, and well researched, this is book is a rich, smart resource for anyone wanting to break down and understand the human rights versus indigenous rights debate, and to move on to more productive conversations about real political and legal change for indigenous peoples.” — Val Napoleon, University of Victoria

“Have you ever looked back at a point in your life when, had good advice been taken, it would have meant a much better future? This book offers that advice, now. Canadians who want to live well because Indigenous peoples prosper need to read Indivisible.” — Robert Lovelace, Retired Chief of Ardoch Algonquin First Nation, professor of global studies, Queen’s University

Educator Information

Table of Contents
Indigenous Human Rights are Indivisible (Joyce Green)

THEORETICAL AND POLITICAL CONTEXT FOR INDIGENOUS HUMAN RIGHTS
Denying Indigenous Human Rights: Colonialism and Rights Discourse in Canada (Joyce Green)
Two The Race Bind: Denying Aboriginal Rights in Australia (Maggie Walter)
Colonialism Past and Present: Indigenous Human Rights and Canadian Policing (Elizabeth Comack)
Indigenous Human Rights and Decolonization (Andrea Smith)

ABORIGINAL HUMAN RIGHTS — SPECIFIC THEMES
McIvor v. Canada: Legislated Patriarchy Meets Aboriginal Women’s Equality Rights (Gwen Brodsky)
Confronting Violence: Indigenous Women. Self-Determination and International Human Rights (Rauna Kuokkanen)
Victoria’s Secret: How to Make a Population of Prey (Mary Eberts)

INTERNATIONAL AND DOMESTIC CONSTITUTIONAL LAW and INDIGENOUS HUMAN RIGHTS
Free, Prior and Informed Consent: Defending Indigenous Rights in the Global Rush for Resources (Craig Benjamin)
The Presumption of Conformity: International Indigenous Human Rights and the Canadian Constitution (Brenda Gunn)
Undermining Indigenous Peoples’ Security and Human Rights (Paul Joffe)

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240 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$34.00

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Working in a Multicultural World: A Guide to Developing Intercultural Competence
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Measureable, data driven outcomes are not the only indicators of success in today’s multicultural and globalized workforce. How employees interact with their colleagues and customers is also a significant factor in their career development.

Luciara Nardon draws on her extensive research and international experience to guide employees and managers through the ambiguous and uncertain waters of today’s multicultural workplace. Each intercultural encounter is unique, involving different people, contexts, dynamics, and actions which general cultural protocols are unable to address. In Working in a Multicultural World, Nardon offers a comprehensive framework for understanding intercultural interactions and developing skills for successful intercultural situations. Numerous examples and exercises, including how to reconcile personal beliefs of equality with a hierarchical workplace and how to respond to perceived aggressiveness in business negotiations, enable employees and managers to embark on reflective processes that will springboard their intercultural competence. Working in a Multicultural World is an accessibly written and valuable resource for all professionals in today’s workplace as well as students and travelers interested in intercultural relations.

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232 pages | 6.25" x 9.25"

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$34.95

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