Memoirs

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Breaking Boundaries: LGBTQ2 Writers on Coming Out and Into Canada
Format: Paperback
  • An anthology of stories and poetry written by Canadian LGBTQ2 authors who are immigrants, refugees, or Canada-born.

    “What does it mean to be LGBTQ2 in Canada? The only possible answer to that question is one given in many voices. That is exactly what this book offers. There is struggle in these stories and poems, but there is also strength and resilience, compassion and determination. Woven together these voices leave me with a sense of hopefulness: a belief that the creativity and fierce commitment of our community will carry us forward as we work to create a Canada that lives up to the dream of freedom and safety it represents to so many people around the world.” — Robin Stevenson, author of Pride: Celebrating Diversity and Community

    Review
    The anthology pieces are diverse with authors who identify as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and 2-Spirited. It also includes stunning artwork by LGBTQ artists and allies. — Rainbow Refugee Society

    Authors & Artists
    Authors in this anthology include Teryl Berg, Kyle Chen, Wendy Judith Cutler, Corrie Hope Furst, Kevin Henry, Anne Hofland, Chantal Hughes, Masaki Kidokoro, Dale Lee Kwong, Austin Lee, JL Lori, Eka Nasution (narrator), Adam Nixon, Rainer Oktovianus (narrator), Gail Marlene Schwartz, Caelan Sinclair, LS Stone, Sosania Tomlinson, E.T. Turner, and Hayley Zacks.

    Artwork by Joni Danielson, Wokie Clark Fraser, Austin Lee, Trinity Lindenau, and Rainer Oktovianus.

    Additional Information
    146 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"
    Edited by Lori Shwydky

    This book contains memoirs, stories, poems, and artwork, which is why it appears in a variety of categories, such as both Fiction and Non-fiction, on our website.

Authentic Canadian Content
$13.95

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Broken Circle: The Dark Legacy of Indian Residential Schools: A Memoir
Format: Paperback
  • Theodore Fontaine lost his family and freedom just after his seventh birthday, when his parents were forced to leave him at an Indian residential school by order of the Roman Catholic Church and the Government of Canada. Twelve years later, he left school frozen at the emotional age of seven. He was confused, angry and conflicted, on a path of self-destruction. At age 29, he emerged from this blackness. By age 32, he had graduated from the Civil Engineering Program at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology and begun a journey of self-exploration and healing.

    In this powerful and poignant memoir, Theodore examines the impact of his psychological, emotional and sexual abuse, the loss of his language and culture, and, most important, the loss of his family and community. He goes beyond details of the abuses of Native children to relate a unique understanding of why most residential school survivors have post-traumatic stress disorders and why succeeding generations of First Nations children suffer from this dark chapter in history.

    Told as remembrances described with insights that have evolved through his healing, his story resonates with his resolve to help himself and other residential school survivors and to share his enduring belief that one can pick up the shattered pieces and use them for good.

$19.95

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Come Walk With Me A Memoir
Format: Paperback
  • In 1983, Beatrice Mosionier (then Culleton) blazed onto the stage of Canadian literature with the publication of her first novel, In Search of April Raintree. With searing clarity, Mosionier explored the struggle of two Metis sisters to make sense of the powerlessness, racism and loss that loomed so large in their lives.

    For years, readers have been asking: how much of April Raintree’s story is from the author’s own life?

    Come Walk with Me, a Memoir, is the answer to that question.

    In it she recounts a life that often parallels that of her most memorable fictional character. Like April, Mosionier confronts great loss – of family, of innocence, and of dignity. However, whereas April is just beginning her quest for self-realization, Mosionier shares with us how she found fulfillment – artistically, politically, and personally. She also includes the recovery of her powerful bond with her mother, a bond nearly destroyed by the family’s separation in 1952.

$19.95

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From the Barren Lands: Fur Trade, First Nations and a Life in Northern Canada
Author: Leonard Flett
Traditional Territory: Cree
Format: Paperback
  • This is a story about the fur trade and First Nations, and the development of northern Canada, seen and experienced not only through Leonard Flett's eyes, but also through the eyes of his father, grandfather, and great-grandfather.The lives of indigenous people in remote areas of northern Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan in the 1960s and 1970s are examined in detail. Flett's successful career with both the Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company provides an insight into the dying days of the fur trade and the rise of a new retail business tailored to First Nations.

$29.95

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It Is a Good Day
Author: Corrine Hunt
Format: Paperback
  • Olaka Iku Da Nala (It is a Good Day) -- In this book Corrine Hunt recounts the experiences surrounding the creation of the medals and the events during and after the 2010 Winter Olympics. Paperback. 86 pages.

$15.00

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Residential Schools, With the Words and Images of Survivors
Format: Hardcover
  • Residential Schools, With the Words and Images of Survivors, A National History honours the survivors, the former students, who attended residential schools. Designed for the general reader this accessible, 112-page history offers a first-person perspective of the residential school system in Canada, as it shares the memories of more than 70 survivors from across Canada as well as 125 archival and contemporary images (65 black & white photographs, 51 colour, some never before published).

    This essential volume written by award-winning author Larry Loyie (Cree), a survivor of St. Bernard Mission residential school in Grouard, AB, and co-authored by Constance Brissenden and Wayne K. Spear (Mohawk), reflects the ongoing commitment of this team to express the truths about residential school experiences and to honour the survivors whose voices are shared in this book.

    Along with the voices, readers will be engaged by the evocative, archival photographs provided by the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre with the assistance of curator Krista McCracken. The book begins with the moving introduction by Larry Loyie, and moves to seven chapters that explore the purpose of this school system; cultures and traditions; leaving home; life at school the half-day system; the dark side of the schools; friendship and laughter coping with a new life; changing world–the healing begins; and an afterword. A detailed, full colour map showing residential schools, timeline with key dates, glossary, and a helpful index (including names of survivors and schools) make this vital resource a must-have for secondary, college, and universities, libraries, and the general reader.

    Reviews
    "A broad and comprehensive review of the history of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples in Canada told from the perspective of First Peoples in a very accessible way. Any educator, regardless of personal background or heritage, would find this timely resource very useful in any classroom." — Gary Fenn and Domenic Bellissimo, executive assistants, Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation

    "Written with a gentle hand, this book describes a history that few Canadians understand or even know about. From the first page, those in search of the truth are engaged in a journey of learning, as they come to understand the true battle of Aboriginal peoples to preserve their cultures and pride. This story is a true account of resiliency and human spirit." — Tracy Zweifel, executive director, Sagitawa Friendship Society, Alberta

    Educator Information
    This must-have resource includes a detailed, full-colour map showing residential schools, a timeline with key dates, and a glossary.

    Recommended for grades 7-12, but would still be useful for adults and college/university courses studying residential schools and Indigenous history.

    Additional Information
    112 pages | 10.43" x 8.26"

Authentic Canadian Content
$34.95

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