Social Studies Resources

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Accounting for Genocide
Format: Paperback
Accounting for Genocide is an original and controversial book that retells the history of the subjugation and ongoing economic marginalization of Canada’s Indigenous peoples. Its authors demonstrate the ways in which successive Canadian governments have combined accounting techniques and economic rationalizations with bureaucratic mechanisms—soft technologies—to deprive Native peoples of their land and natural resources and to control the minutiae of their daily economic and social lives. Particularly shocking is the evidence that federal and provincial governments are today still prepared to use legislative and fiscal devices in order to facilitate the continuing exploitation and damage of Indigenous people’s lands.
$29.95

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America's Gift
Format: Paperback
What the world owes to the Americas and their first inhabitants

The world was never the same after 1492. The encounter of two “old worlds” gave rise to a truly new world on both sides of the Atlantic. America’s Gift recalls the full significance of the contact made between Europe and the Americas, mistakenly called the “New World.” As Columbian intellectual German Arciniegas wrote: “From questions of astronomy to the food on our table, America began transforming Europe the moment European explorers set foot on American soil. And what a transformation it was!” Authors Käthe Roth and Denis Vaugeois ably use an alphabetical glossary to connect the particular to the universal as they reveal some of the vast contributions the Americas and their original inhabitants made to the world. America’s Gift takes readers from one epiphany to another. In other words, Europe became a new world in the true sense of the term.
$22.95

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Bound to Have Blood: Frontier Newspapers and the Plains Indian Wars
Author: John Reilly
Format: Paperback
The Plains Indian Wars were always front-page news in frontier newspapers, and it was to such local newspapers that the public invariably turned for information about the fighting. The vivid, colorful accounts there captivated the nation—and in hindsight reveal much about the attitudes and prejudices of the public and the press.
Bound to Have Blood takes readers back to the late nineteenth century to show how newspaper reporting influenced attitudes about the conflict between the United States and Native Americans. Emphasizing primary sources and eyewitness accounts, Bound to Have Blood focuses on eight watershed events between 1862 and 1891: the Great Sioux Uprising in Minnesota, the Sand Creek massacre, the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868, the Battle of the Little Big Horn, the flight of the Nez Perce, the Cheyenne outbreak, the trial of Standing Bear, and the massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890 and its aftermath. Each chapter examines an individual event, analyzing the balance and accuracy of the newspaper coverage and how the reporting of the time reinforced stereotypes about Native Americans.
$18.50

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British Columbia, It's Land, Mineral and Water Resources Teacher's Guide
Author: Cathy Ready
Format: Paperback
This resource was developed specifically for the BC Science and Social Studies curricula. It is the only comprehensive resource available which provides all the content necessary to learn about B.C.'s living and non-living resources. And best of all it has been developed in B.C. by B.C. educators and has been recommended by the BC Ministry of Education.

Students will learn:
- about land, mineral and water resources; the ways we use the resources and the effects of using them.
- how we use the land for growing crops, for raising animals and hunting wildlife and for forestry, tourism and recreation.
- that B.C.'s mountains are full of minerals and how this abundance of minerals makes mining B.C.'s third most important industry.
- why water is an important resource in B.C. for drinking, hydroelectric power, recreation, industry and as a food source.
- the uses, benefits and economic impact of BC's resources; from traditional First Nations' to present day.
-the evolution of the technology used in resource development and use, environmental issues, sustainability and careers.

The comprehensive teacher's guide provides support materials necessary to meet the prescribed learning outcomes for both the development of skills and the acquisition of knowledge. Hands-on activities, blackline masters and teaching strategies are included.
$59.99

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Bull Trout's Gift
Format: Hardcover

"We were wealthy from the water," Mitch Smallsalmon says, and like all the tribal elders, he speaks to our understanding of the natural world and the consequences of change. In this book the wisdom of the elders is passed on to the young as the story of the Jocko River, the home of the bull trout, unfolds for a group of schoolchildren on a field trip.

The Jocko River flows through the Flathead Indian Reservation in northwestern Montana. For thousands of years the Salish and Pend d’Oreille Indians lived along its banks, finding food and medicine in its plants and fish, and in the game hunted on its floodplain. Readers of this story will learn, along with the students of Ms. Howlett's class, about the history and culture of the river and its meaning in Native life, tradition, and religion. They will also discover the scientific background and social importance behind the Tribes' efforts to restore the bull trout to its home waters.

Beautifully illustrated and narrated in the tradition of the Salish and Kootenai Tribes, this account of conservation as the legacy of one generation to the next is about being good to the land that has been good to us. Bull Trout's Gift is steeped in the culture, history, and science that our children must know if they hope to transform past wisdom into future good.

$32.95

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Canoe Kids Volume 1: The Ojibwe of Great Spirit Island
Author: Canoe Kids
Content Territory: Anishinaabeg, Ojibway
Format: Paperback
Canoe Kids Vol. 1 The Ojibwe of Great Spirit Island is the first issue of a 24 edition series designed as family books for kids all ages. This eight-year project will see the Canoe Kids Team embed with 24 Peoples. The mandate for the full-colour book (161 full colour high res photographs) is Exploring Indigenous Cultures through Authentic Indigenous Voices. The publication balances culture, equity and the environment in a beautiful mix that reminds the reader of the pictorial quality of National Geographic with a more in depth editorial content.

This first issue (in a series of 24) focuses on the Ojibwe People of Great Spirit Island (Manitoulin Island). In 129 pages the reader is introduced to the Ojibwe People who kindly assisted the Canoe Kids staff by allowing access to their traditional territory. Canoe Kids acknowledges the generosity of the Council of Aundeck Omni Kanning and the People of the six Manitoulin communities.

Educator Information
Each edition follows a common theme and features:

1: Compelling and beautiful pictorials that draw you into the stories and place of the featured community
2: The story of the vessel used by the featured Peoples
3: Art and Food
4: A Kids Zone
5: Resources for kids, parents and educators
6: Stories by and of the featured Peoples in each edition
7: Extraordinary pictures of the lives, land and waters of the featured Peoples

The materials are equal parts cultural and environmental. The latter is a natural offshoot of the former as Indigenous cultures are wrapped around and through the lands and water and sky both spiritually and from a harvesting and gathering perspective. Indigenous Peoples have long been the caretakers of Mother Earth and we can all learn from these experts whose message is perhaps more relevant today than ever.

Indigenous communities have always included the little ones in their circles and talk and teach to them in the same way they talk and teach to young adults and adults. Canoe Kids decided to follow that inclusive way of life for the layout of each book. Rather than create editions for different age groups, Canoe Kids decided to have one book for all ages.

CANOE KIDS is an ideal ongoing resource for teachers and is well received in all libraries. Articles are organized and developed so that there are materials for every age group, grade level, subject and interest.

K through 3 use Canoe Kids to read beautiful and ancient stories. There is beautiful original art to explore and a Kids Zone with puzzles, word searches, colouring, cutouts and more. Mid grades use the materials to study the culture, food and wildlife of the featured cultures. Grades 8 through 12 use stories that are more in depth from Dr. David Suzuki about the environment and there are discussion articles about living well and properly with Mother Nature as well as articles about the history and geography of the featured People.

Additional Information
130 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"
Authentic Canadian Content
$22.95

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Canoe Kids Volume 2: The Haida of Haida Gwaii
Author: Canoe Kids
Content Territory: Haida
Format: Paperback
Canoe Kids Vol. 2 The Haida is the second issue of a 24 edition series designed as family books for kids all ages. This eight-year project will see the Canoe Kids Team embed with 24 Peoples the publication designed as a family book for kids all ages. The mandate for the full-colour book (197 full colour high res photographs) is Exploring Indigenous Cultures through Authentic Indigenous Voices. The publication balances culture, equity and the environment in a beautiful mix that reminds the reader of the pictorial quality of National Geographic with a more in depth editorial content.

This second issue focuses on the Haida Nation of Haida Gwaii. In 165 pages the reader is introduced to the Haida People who kindly assisted the Canoe Kids staff by allowing access to Haida territory. Canoe Kids acknowledges the generosity of the Council of Haida Nation, the Haida Museum and the Haida Heritage Centre.

Educator Information
Each edition follows a common theme and features:

1: Compelling and beautiful pictorials that draw you into the stories and place of the featured community
2: The story of the vessel used by the featured Peoples
3: Art and Food
4: A Kids Zone
5: Resources for kids, parents and educators
6: Stories by and of the featured Peoples in each edition
7: Extraordinary pictures of the lives, land and waters of the featured Peoples

The materials are equal parts cultural and environmental. The latter is a natural offshoot of the former as Indigenous cultures are wrapped around and through the lands and water and sky both spiritually and from a harvesting and gathering perspective. Indigenous Peoples have long been the caretakers of Mother Earth and we can all learn from these experts whose message is perhaps more relevant today than ever.

Indigenous communities have always included the little ones in their circles and talk and teach to them in the same way they talk and teach to young adults and adults. Canoe Kids decided to follow that inclusive way of life for the layout of each book. Rather than create editions for different age groups, Canoe Kids decided to have one book for all ages.

K through 3 use Canoe Kids to read beautiful and ancient stories. There is beautiful original art to explore and a Kids Zone with puzzles, word searches, colouring, cutouts and more. Mid grades use the materials to study the culture, food and wildlife of the featured cultures. Grades 8 through 12 use stories that are more in depth from Dr. David Suzuki about the environment and there are discussion articles about living well and properly with Mother Nature as well as articles about the history and geography of the featured People.

Additional Information
165 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"
Authentic Canadian Content
$22.95

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Canoe Kids Volume 3: The Mi'kmaq of Newfoundland
Author: Canoe Kids
Content Territory: Mi’kmaw
Format: Paperback
Canoe Kids Vol. 3 The Mi'kmaq of Newfoundland (Ktaqamkuk) is the third issue of a 24 edition series designed as family books for kids all ages. This eight to ten year project will see the Canoe Kids Team embed with 24 Peoples. The mandate for the full-colour book (150+ full colour high res photographs) is Exploring Indigenous Cultures through Authentic Indigenous Voices. The publication balances culture, equity and the environment in a beautiful mix that reminds the reader of the pictorial quality of National Geographic with a more in depth editorial content.

This third issue (in a series of 24) focuses on the Mi'kmaq of the Newfoundland and north Atlantic coast. In 150 pages the reader is introduced to the Mi'kmaq People who kindly assisted the Canoe Kids staff by allowing access to their traditional territory. Canoe Kids acknowledges the generosity of the Council of Flat Bay and Conn River.

Educator Information
Each edition follows a common theme and features:

1: Compelling and beautiful pictorials that draw you into the stories and place of the featured community
2: The story of the vessel used by the featured Peoples
3: Art and Food
4: A Kids Zone
5: Resources for kids, parents and educators
6: Stories by and of the featured Peoples in each edition
7: Extraordinary pictures of the lives, land and waters of the featured Peoples

The materials are equal parts cultural and environmental. The latter is a natural offshoot of the former as Indigenous cultures are wrapped around and through the lands and water and sky both spiritually and from a harvesting and gathering perspective. Indigenous Peoples have long been the caretakers of Mother Earth and we can all learn from these experts whose message is perhaps more relevant today than ever.

Indigenous communities have always included the little ones in their circles and talk and teach to them in the same way they talk and teach to young adults and adults. Canoe Kids decided to follow that inclusive way of life for the layout of each book. Rather than create editions for different age groups, Canoe Kids decided to have one book for all ages.

K through 3 use Canoe Kids to read beautiful and ancient stories. There is beautiful original art to explore and a Kids Zone with puzzles, word searches, colouring, cutouts and more. Mid grades use the materials to study the culture, food and wildlife of the featured cultures. Grades 8 through 12 use stories that are more in depth from Dr. David Suzuki about the environment and there are discussion articles about living well and properly with Mother Nature as well as articles about the history and geography of the featured People.

Additional Information
150 pages | 8.50" x 11.00"
$22.95

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Claiming the Land: British Columbia and the Making of a New El Dorado
Author: Daniel Marshall
Format: Paperback
This trailblazing history of early British Columbia focuses on a single year, 1858, the year of the Fraser River gold rush - the third great mass-migration of gold seekers after the Californian and Australian rushes in search of a new El Dorado. Marshall's history becomes an adventure, prospecting the rich pay streaks of British Columbia's "founding" event and the gold fever that gripped populations all along the Pacific Slope. Marshall unsettles many of our most taken-for-granted assumptions: he shows how foreign miner-militias crossed the 49th parallel, taking the law into their own hands, and conducting extermination campaigns against Indigenous peoples while forcibly claiming the land. Drawing on new evidence, Marshall explores the three principal cultures of the goldfields - those of the fur trade (both Native and the Hudson's Bay Company), Californian, and British world views. The year 1858 was a year of chaos unlike any other in British Columbia and American Pacific Northwest history. It produced not only violence but the formal inauguration of colonialism, Native reserves and, ultimately, the expansion of Canada to the Pacific Slope. Among the haunting legacies of this rush are the cryptic place names that remain - such as American Creek, Texas Bar, Boston Bar, and New York Bar - while the unresolved question of Indigenous sovereignty continues to claim the land.

Additional Information
6.00" x 9.00" | Bibliography | 30 black & white photos
Authentic Canadian Content
$24.95

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Colouring Bentwood Boxes: Northwest Coast First Nations and Native Art Colouring Book
Format: Paperback
Native Elements - Colouring Bentwood Boxes: Northwest Coast First Nations & Native Art

Find your own creative rhythm in Colouring Boxes of Treasures: Northwest Coast First Nations and Native Art.

Features:

- Features the artwork of over 20 indigenous artists.

- Coloured back cover featuring every design for inspiration.

- Printed in Canada using non-toxic, vegetable based ink, and water based coating.

- 32 pages; measures 8.5" x 11".

Additional Information
This is a colouring book for adults and young adults; however, intermediate and secondary students would still enjoy colouring in the intricate drawings.
Authentic Canadian Content
$10.95

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Colouring Our Drums: Northwest Coast First Nations & Native Art Colouring Book
Format: Paperback
Native Elements - Colouring Our Drums: Northwest Coast First Nations and Art

We are all born to the beat of a drum, it is within us. Our drum beat is what leads us to find our own path through our journey in life. - Doug Horne, Coast Salish

Features:

Features 32 pages of original drum drawings from Northwest Coast Indigenous artists.

Printed in Canada using non-toxic, vegetable based ink, and water based coating.

32 pages; measures 8.5" x 11".

Additional Information
This is a colouring book for adults and young adults; however, intermediate and secondary students would still enjoy colouring in the intricate drum drawings.
Authentic Canadian Content
$10.95

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Copying People
Author: Daniel Francis
Format: Paperback
Before the west was widely settled, photographs provided the first glimpse white society had of the aboriginal people who occupied the hinterlands of the continent. Copying People - a phrase borrowed from the Haida of the Queen Charlotte Islands that means "camera" - is a collection of historical photographs chosen from the vast number of images in museums and archives across North America. Taken by professional photographers, surveyors, anthropologists, civil servants, and tourists, these fascinating images show how early non-Native photographers "pictured" First Nations people and influenced the outside world's perceptions of them.



Many of these photographs attempt to document the "traditional" Indian, with their subjects dressed up in wigs, costumes, and other props provided by the photographer. In an effort to record for posterity what they viewed as a doomed race, the photographers helped construct the "idea" of the Indian in the collective mind of white society. Other photographers used images of Native people for commercial purposes, or pictured their subjects in suits and dresses, hoping to appeal to an audience eager for evidence that Natives were becoming "civilized."



Depicting Native societies under a great deal of stress at a time of tremendous change in their way of life and their environment, the photographs also reveal societies struggling to preserve their cultures and successfully adapting to new economic opportunities. And despite what we might think of their motives, many photographers produced images of remarkable power and enduring beauty.



Covering all of British Columbia, the book represents the work of every important photographer dealing with aboriginal people in the province before World war II. With 140 archival images, Copying People offers a privileged glimpse of British Columbia's original inhabitants.
$22.95

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Dr. Oronhyatekha: Security, Justice, and Equality
Content Territory: Mohawk
Format: Paperback
A man of two cultures in an era where his only choices were to be a trailblazer or get left by the wayside.

Dr. Oronhyatekha (“Burning Sky”), born in the Mohawk nation on the Six Nations of the Grand River territory in 1841, led an extraordinary life, rising to prominence in medicine, sports, politics, fraternalism, and business. He was one of the first Indigenous physicians in Canada, the first to attend Oxford University, a Grand River representative to the Prince of Wales during the 1860 royal tour, a Wimbledon rifle champion, the chairman of the Grand General Indian Council of Ontario, and Grand Templar of the International Order of Good Templars. He counted among his friends some of the most powerful people of the day, including John A. Macdonald and Theodore Roosevelt. He successfully challenged the racial criteria of the Independent Order of Foresters to become its first non-white member and ultimately its supreme chief ranger.

At a time when First Nations peoples struggled under assimilative government policy and society’s racial assumptions, his achievements were remarkable.

Oronhyatekha was raised among a people who espoused security, justice, and equality as their creed. He was also raised in a Victorian society guided by God, honour, and duty. He successfully interwove these messages throughout his life, and lived as a man of significant accomplishments in both worlds.

Awards
2016 Ontario Historical Society Joseph Brant Award winner
2017 Speaker's Book Award short-listed

Review
With their detailed biography of this giant of Canadian history, Jamieson and Hamilton have done an enormous favour both for aboriginals and non-aboriginals living on this piece of geography currently known as Canada.
Tworowtimes

Key Points
- A comprehensive biography of Dr. Oronhyatekha, Canada’s first Indigenous physician, and an influential First Nations statesman.
- Covers his friendships with Teddy Roosevelt and John A. Macdonald and his international business.
- He was the first non-White member of the Independent Order of Foresters (IOF), a fraternally organized life-insurance company, having successfully challenged the race criteria for membership.
- As CEO of the IOF, he transformed it from a near-bankrupt, legally embattled organization to a financially stable international company.
- Ahead of his time, Oronhyatekha attempted to broaden the mandate of the IOF so that women and French-Canadians could belong.
- Also details the political, social, and historical context of the Six Nations of the Grand River community in the mid-nineteenth century.

Additional Information
368 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" | b&w and colour illustrations | notes, index, bibliography
Authentic Canadian Content
$26.99

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Emily Patterson: The Heroic Life of a Milltown Nurse
Author: Lisa Anne Smith
Format: Paperback
When Emily Patterson arrives in the Pacific Northwest with her husband and children in 1862, she finds herself worlds away from Bath, Maine, the staunchly pious township of her birth. Up the remote reaches of Vancouver Island’s Alberni Canal, Emily learns much about self-reliance in a fledgling milltown where pioneer loggers and the native Tseshaht community share an often tempestuous co-existence. In search of their ideal homestead, the Pattersons next travel to Oregon’s fertile Willamette and Columbia River regions, confronting both joy and tragedy along the way. After many years, their quest finally leads them to Burrard Inlet, where the sawmilling communities of Hastings Mill and Moodyville duel for lumber supremacy. Emily gains wide recognition amidst the hard living mill workers for her extraordinary nursing skills, self-taught from sheer necessity over the course of her nomadic life. In a time when the nearest doctor is several hours of travel away, Emily is called upon day or night to deal with any medical situation, be it removing a splinter, treating a cough or preparing a body for burial.

Awards
2009 Kurd Lasswitz Prize winner

2013 Kurd Lasswitz Prize winner

2008 German Book Prize short-listed

Additional Information
312 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" | black and white photos throughout
Authentic Canadian Content
$21.95

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Feathers and Fools
Author: Mem Fox
Format: Paperback
Feathers and Fools is an allegory about how wars can begin with a simple fear of others based on misconceptions. For some time the swans and peacocks have lived peacefully by a pond. One day the peacocks begin to contemplate the differences between themselves and their neighbours. This then leads to the fear that the swans may one day change the peacock's way of life. With this fear fully ingrained in their minds, they begin to build arms against their neighbours. "We shall hurl these arrows at their throats and slaughter everyone should they ever try to change our way of life."

Upon hearing this, the swans began to build arms against the peacocks in fear that they would be attacked. The fear grew as each group acquired more and more arms against each other. The peacocks soon mistook the action of a swan as an act of aggression and thus, a war began. "Soon cries filled the sir and blood darkened the earth." When all the feathers had settled, there were no birds to be found, both swans and peacocks had been destroyed.

Foxs antiwar story touches on a common issue many nations face and how humans handle the concept of war. As history has revealed, humans have begun wars often times with very little knowledge of their opponents on the battlefield. The author artfully displays how mankind, although similar in many ways can decimate each other because of our lack of knowledge of the similarities amongst all groups. At the end of the story, Fox gives us a hopeful ending with the hatching of a lone peacock and a lone swan. These young birds meet and notice how similar they are and soon become friends. "So off they went together, in peace and unafraid, to face the day and share the world." Fox recognizes that present and future generations hold the keys to ending war.

The main characters, swans and peacocks are interchangeable with any nation, country, or people who have endured wars and their aftermaths. The book also emphasizes the importance of learning from history and not repeating it. Illustrator Nicholas Wiltons paintings bring out the beauty of the worlds of the peacock and swan. With acrylic jewel tone paints, he captures the beauty of the peacocks bright feathers and the swans graceful profile. As the story progresses, you can see the changes of the birds body language and actions helping bring emphasis on how the building toward war changes reactions and opinions of the two sides. The paintings were created to evoke the feeling of a folktale or fable with its aged looks and block style borders. Feathers and Fools is a wonderful book that could open the possibility for the discussion of topics such as war, the arms race, and similarities amongst people and their ways of lives. This book could be used at all levels for discussion.
$11.99

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