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Education

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Aboriginal Education: Current Crisis and Future Alternatives
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis; First Nations; Inuit;

This book reviews the actual situation in terms of Métis, Inuit, and First Nations peoples in Canada using the most recent data available. It explores the issues historically, assesses the costs to both Aboriginal peoples and the country, reviews alternative approaches to solving the problems, and includes innovative analysis of the causes of these problems.

Suggested Grades: 10-12
ABPBC

Authentic Canadian Content
$36.95

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Aboriginal Education: Fulfilling the Promise
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Education is at the heart of the struggle of Aboriginal peoples to regain control over their lives as communities and nations. The promise of education is that it will instruct the people in ways to live long and well, respecting the wisdom of their ancestors and fulfilling their responsibilities in the circle of life. Aboriginal Education documents the significant gains in recent years in fulfilling this promise. It also analyzes the institutional inertia and government policies that continue to get in the way.

The contributors to this book emphasize Aboriginal philosophies and priorities in teaching methods, program design, and institutional development. An introductory chapter on policy discourse since 1966 provides a context for considering important achievements and constraints in transforming Aboriginal education into an instrument of self-determination. A number of the chapters are drawn from reports and papers prepared for the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples as background to its 1996 report. They cover a broad range of subjects: educational practice from elementary to post-secondary levels; initiatives in language conservation and communications media; the development of Aboriginal institutions; and policy discourse among Aboriginal, federal, provincial, and territorial bodies. As the authors make clear, Aboriginal education continues to be practised on an intensely political terrain. While governments fund particular Aboriginal initiatives, the homogenizing pressures of a globalizing society are relentless. Political gains in negotiating self-government thus establish the context in which the distinctiveness of Aboriginal education and cultures is sustained.

This book is a valuable resource for administrators, educators and students with an interest in Aboriginal issues and educational reform.

Edited by: Marlene Brant Castellano | Lynne Davis | Louise Lahache

Authentic Canadian Content
$46.95

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Aboriginal Oral Traditions
Editors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;

Oral traditions are a distinct way of knowing and the means by which knowledge is reproduced, preserved and transferred from generation to generation. The conference from which these essays were selected created an opportunity for people to come together and exchange information and experiences over three days. The scholarship may be grouped into three broad areas: oral traditions and knowledge of the environment, economy, education and/or health of communities; oral traditions and continuance of language and culture; and the effects of intellectual property rights, electronic media and public discourse on oral traditions.

Authentic Canadian Content
$27.95

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Aboriginal, Northern, and Community Economic Development: Papers and Retrospectives
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Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

John Loxley has worked in community economic development as a practitioner, advisor, teacher and scholar for over 30 years. The wealth of that experience is reflected in this book, which grapples with the conceptual and political complexities of addressing northern and Aboriginal poverty. Loxley examines a number of possible approaches to economic development, placing each within a broader theoretical and policy perspective, and considering its growth potential and class impact. Accessible and theoretically sophisticated, the book blends international development theory with northern Canadian and Aboriginal realities. It includes an important chapter on traditional Aboriginal values and culture and their relationship to the land.

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$21.95

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Activating the Heart: Storytelling, Knowledge Sharing, and Relationships
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: 11; 12; University/College;

Activating the Heart is an exploration of storytelling as a tool for knowledge production and sharing to build new connections between people and their histories, environments, and cultural geographies. The collection pays particular attention to the significance of storytelling in Indigenous knowledge frameworks and extends into other ways of knowing in works where scholars have embraced narrative and story as a part of their research approach.

In the first section, Storytelling to Understand, authors draw on both theoretical and empirical work to examine storytelling as a way of knowing. In the second section, Storytelling to Share, authors demonstrate the power of stories to share knowledge and convey significant lessons, as well as to engage different audiences in knowledge exchange. The third section, Storytelling to Create, contains three poems and a short story that engage with storytelling as a means to produce or create knowledge, particularly through explorations of relationship to place.

The result is an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural dialogue that yields important insights in terms of qualitative research methods, language and literacy, policy-making, human–environment relationships, and healing. This book is intended for scholars, artists, activists, policymakers, and practitioners who are interested in storytelling as a method for teaching, cross-cultural understanding, community engagement, and knowledge exchange.

Educator Information
This book would be useful for the following subjects: Indigenous Studies, Literary Criticism, Creative Writing, and Social Science.

Recommended in the Canadian Indigenous Books for Schools 2019-2020 resource list as being useful for grades 11-12 for English Language Arts and Social Studies.

Additional Information
220 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Edited by Julia Christensen, Christopher Cox and Lisa Szabo-Jones.

Authenticity Note: Contributors to this work identify with various First Nations and Metis communities.  Therefore, the Authentic Indigenous Text label has been applied.  It is up to readers to determine if this will work as an authentic resource for their purposes.

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Authentic Indigenous Text
$24.99

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Arts of Engagement: Taking Aesthetic Action In and Beyond the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Arts of Engagement focuses on the role that music, film, visual art, and Indigenous cultural practices play in and beyond Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools. Contributors here examine the impact of aesthetic and sensory experience in residential school history, at TRC national and community events, and in artwork and exhibitions not affiliated with the TRC. Using the framework of “aesthetic action,” the essays expand the frame of aesthetics to include visual, aural, and kinetic sensory experience, and question the ways in which key components of reconciliation such as apology and witnessing have social and political effects for residential school survivors, intergenerational survivors, and settler publics.

This volume makes an important contribution to the discourse on reconciliation in Canada by examining how aesthetic and sensory interventions offer alternative forms of political action and healing. These forms of aesthetic action encompass both sensory appeals to empathize and invitations to join together in alliance and new relationships as well as refusals to follow the normative scripts of reconciliation. Such refusals are important in their assertion of new terms for conciliation, terms that resist the imperatives of reconciliation as a form of resolution.

This collection charts new ground by detailing the aesthetic grammars of reconciliation and conciliation. The authors document the efficacies of the TRC for the various Indigenous and settler publics it has addressed, and consider the future aesthetic actions that must be taken in order to move beyond what many have identified as the TRC’s political limitations.

Educator Information
This book would be useful for Art, Art & Politics, Social Science, and Indigenous Studies courses.

Additional Information
382 pages | 6.00" x 9.00" | 24 colour illustrations, 2 printed music items

Edited by Dylan Robinson and Keavy Martin

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$39.99

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Dancing on Our Turtle's Back
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;

Many promote Reconciliation as a “new” way for Canada to relate to Indigenous Peoples. In Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence, and a New Emergence activist, editor, and educator Leanne Simpson asserts reconciliation must be grounded in political resurgence and must support the regeneration of Indigenous languages, oral cultures, and traditions of governance.

Simpson explores philosophies and pathways of regeneration, resurgence, and a new emergence through the Nishnaabeg language, Creation Stories, walks with Elders and children, celebrations and protests, and meditations on these experiences. She stresses the importance of illuminating Indigenous intellectual traditions to transform their relationship to the Canadian state.

Challenging and original, Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back provides a valuable new perspective on the struggles of Indigenous Peoples.

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$24.95

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Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;

An essential text that critically examines the basis of Western research, and the positioning of the indigenous as 'Other.'

After a long-awaited 13 years, the new Second Edition of the best-selling methodology textbook is finally here.

The Second Edition of Decolonizing Methodologies by Linda Tuhiwai Smith has been heavily updated with:

  • A brand NEW Foreword
  • Entire NEW Chapter 11
  • Substantially revised chapter 5, 7, 8 and Conclusion

The Second Edition of Decolonizing Methodologies will be the essential textbook for anyone involved in researching indigenous people, and a classic text in research methodology.

To the colonized, the term "research" is conflated with colonialism; academic research steeped in imperialism remains a painful reality. This essential volume explores intersections of imperialism and research - specifically, the ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and tradition as "regimes of truth." Concepts such as "discovery" and "claiming" are discussed and an argument presented that the decolonization of research methods will help to reclaim control over indigenous ways of knowing and being.

Now in its eagerly awaited second edition, this bestselling book has been substantially revised, with new case studies and examples and important additions on new indigenous literature and the role of research in indigenous struggles for social justice, which brings this essential volume urgently up-to-date.

Reviews
'A landmark in the process not only of decolonizing methodology, but of decolonizing imperial Western knowledge and ways of knowing.' - Walter Mignolo, Duke University

'Linda Tuhiwai Smith's trail-blazing book is one of the greatest contributions towards instilling pride and dignity in indigenous peoples all over the world.' - Harald Gaski, University of Tromsø, Norway.

'This second edition will secure and expand the place of this book as a classic in the field of indigenous methodologies.' -Patti Lather, Ohio State University

'Equips indigenous scholars with a series of methodological and political strategies for developing research that is enabling and empowering.' - Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Indigenous Studies Research Network, Queensland University of Technology

'A text of broad intellectual reach and political depth, this book transformed the fields of educational research and critical epistemology.'- Michelle Fine, City University New York

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Foreword
Introduction
1. Imperialism, History, Writing and Theory
2. Research through Imperial Eyes
3. Colonizing Knowledges
4. Research Adventures on Indigenous Land
5. Notes from Down Under
6. The Indigenous People's Project: Setting a New Agenda
7. Articulating an Indigenous Research Agenda
8. Twenty-Five Indigenous Projects
9. Responding to the Imperatives of an Indigenous Agenda: A Case Study of Maori
10. Towards Developing Indigenous Methodologies: Kaupapa Maori Research
11. Choosing the Margins: The Role of Research in Indigenous Struggles for Social Justice
12. Getting the Story Right, Telling the Story Well: Indigenous Activism, Indigenous Research
Conclusion: A Personal Journey
Index

Additional Information
242 pages | 6.00" x 10.00" | 2nd Edition

Authentic Indigenous Text
$51.95

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Decolonizing Research: Indigenous Storywork as Methodology
Format: Paperback

A landmark exploration from indigenous scholars and activists into how indigenous storytelling practices can decolonize the research of indigenous societies.

From Oceania to North America, indigenous peoples have created storytelling traditions of incredible depth and diversity. The term “indigenous storywork” has come to encompass the sheer breadth of ways in which indigenous storytelling serves as a historical record, as a form of teaching and learning, and as an expression of indigenous culture and identity. But such traditions have too often been relegated to the realm of myth and legend, recorded as fragmented distortions, or erased altogether.

Decolonizing Research brings together indigenous researchers and activists from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand to assert the unique value of indigenous storywork as a focus of research, and to develop methodologies that rectify the colonial attitudes inherent in much past and current scholarship. By bringing together their own indigenous perspectives, and by treating indigenous storywork on its own terms, the contributors illuminate valuable new avenues for research, and show how such reworked scholarship can contribute to the movement for indigenous rights and self-determination.

Educator Information
Table of Contents

  • Part I: Aotearoa NZ
    • 1. Pūrākau: From the Inside Out - Jenny Lee-Morgan
    • 2. Within the Womb of our Ancestor: Restoring and Restorying our Ancestral Lnowledges through Wānanga - Naomi Simmonds
    • 3. Naming our Names and Telling our Stories - Joeliee Seed-Pihama
    • 4. Pūrākau as Method: Storying Gender in Māori Worlds - Hayley Marama Cavino
    • 5. Indigenous Storywork and Law: Exploring Māori Legal Traditions - Carwyn Jones
    • 6. Whānau Storytelling as a Decolonial Research Method - Leonie Pihama
  • Part II: Australia
    • 7. Yanyba Jarngkurr, Kingkalli: Song Tradition Renewal and Story-World Enactments of Sustainable Autonomy - Jason De Santolo, Gadrian Hoosan, Bruce King
    • 8. Indigenous Story-Telling: Decolonising Institutions and Assertive Self-Determination and implications for Legal Practice - Larissa Behrendt
    • 9. Designing a Sovereign Storytelling Model - Dr Romaine Moreton
    • 10. Fire Country: A Storied Journey into the Revitalising of Ancient Fire Knowledge Practices - Victor Steffensen
    • 11. Lilyology as a Transformative Framework for Decolonising Ethical Spaces within the Academy - Nerida Blair
    • 12. Storywork in Storytelling: Indigenous Knowledges as Literary Theory - Evelyn Araluen Corr
  • Part III: Canada
    • 13. Indigenous Storywork: Past, Present, and Future - Jo-ann Archibald Q’um Q’um Xiiem
    • 14. Indigenous Visual Storywork for Indigenous Film Aesthetics - Dorothy Christian
    • 15. Using the Indigenous Storywork Principles to Guide Ethical Practices in Research - Sara Florence Davidson
    • 16. Leq’7es te Stsptekwll: Our Memories Long Ago - Georgina Martin and Elder Jean William
    • 17. Indigenous Storywork, Mathematics Education, and Community-Based Research - Cynthia Nicol, Joanne Yovanovich, Jo-ann Archibald

Additional Information
256 pages | 5.50" x 8.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$43.50

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Dropping the 'T' from CAN'T: Enabling Aboriginal Post-Secondary Academic Success in Science and Mathematics
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Within Dropping the “T” from CAN'T, Dr. Michelle Hogue presents and analyses interviews with eight highly successful Indigenous women and men in order to discern what enables Indigenous people to become successful in the sciences and mathematics such that they are able to pursue related professions. Importantly, Dr. Hogue presents interviews with two Indigenous individuals who started yet did not complete advanced degrees in order to find out what impediments brought their academic journeys to a premature end.

Dr. Hogue’s interview findings, paired with current and relevant literature, serves to enlighten and support the Truth and Reconciliation Commissions Calls to Action to provide culturally relevant education for Aboriginal learners. Education must be culturally and holistically relevant in order to invite, engage, and enable learners; this is true of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal learners. While this book specifically examines science and mathematics education, the lessons and findings will apply across disciplines.

Foreword by Dr. Laara Fitznor. Reviews by: Dr.'s Cheryl Bartlett, Fidgi Gendron, Yvonne Poitress Pratt, and Leroy Little Bear.

Reviews
"Indigenous students CAN succeed in post-secondary science and mathematics! This is the clear message in Dr. Hogue’s book. Recognizing, reshaping, and retelling insights about success within personal stories requires a skillful story worker and Dr. Hogue is superb. Using the Medicine Wheel, she conveys understandings ‘wholistically’ to provide the much-needed complement to institutional STEM pathways and programs. Hers is a book for everyone: students, educators, academics, administrators, leaders, funders, parents, youth ..." — Cheryl Bartlett

"What a refreshing book! Michelle Hogue celebrates Aboriginal women and men who journeyed through post-secondary education in science and mathematics and achieved their dreams. She examines their successes and challenges and highlights how Aboriginal science and Western science can come together to reach inclusive learning and knowing. These stories will inspire not only Aboriginal people but everybody to not give up and work hard to reach their goals." — Fidji Gendron

"As educators continue to ask how all subject areas can be Indigenized, Hogue steps into contested teaching and learning territory with the same fearless attitude she takes in teaching math and science from an Indigenous perspective. This fascinating book contains insights and stories from Indigenous scientists providing irrefutable evidence there is no anomaly between being Indigenous and being a scientist." — Yvonne Poitras Pratt 

"Michelle is an extremely good writer. I can tell she put a tremendous amount of research into the book. I very much like her layout of the Medicine Wheel into: Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter. Doing so clearly brings out the barriers to science education for Indigenous students. Overall, the book makes the point that the ’T’ can be dropped from CAN’T providing we know the culture of Indigenous students and the struggles they have to go through to fulfill their personal goals of becoming scientists." — Leroy Little Bear

Educator Information
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements and Dedication
A Note on Terms
Table of Contents
Foreword, By: Laara Fitznor, EdD
Preface: Tan’si, Hello

SPRING
Prologue
Introduction: The Environment
Puzzlements and Questions

SUMMER
Women’s Journey
Men’s Journey
Re-framing the Journey
The Talking Circle

FALL
Understanding the Space Between
Navigating the Space Between

WINTER
Coming to Understand
Philosophically Navigating
Reframing: Coming Full Circle

A NEW CYCLE
Bridging Cultures, Two-Eyed Seeing & the 21st Century
Final Reflections
The Equation for Success

Appendix
References
Index
About the Author

Additional Information
199 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$27.00

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Echoes of Our Dakota Ancestors
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Sioux; Dakota;
Grade Levels: University/College;

Enjoy imakhmakhap woyakapi (enjoyments that are told) in Dakota. Each chapter in this charmingly illustrated booklet focuses on a month of the year, with stories, poems and songs in the Dakota language. Doris Pratt, a long time language teacher and material developer, shares this Dakota collection to help students learn and practice the language.

Educator Information
This book is written in the Dakota language. It is useful as a total Dakota language program or can be used to supplement any Dakota language course. It is suitable for adult language courses. Included in the appendices are explanations of the Dakota language and a prayer by Hector Bunn.

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Authentic Indigenous Text
$4.95

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Elements of Indigenous Style: A Guide for Writing By and About Indigenous Peoples
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous;
Grade Levels: 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; University/College;

Elements of Indigenous Style offers Indigenous writers and editors—and everyone creating works about Indigenous Peoples—the first published guide to common questions and issues of style and process. Everyone working in words or other media needs to read this important new reference, and to keep it nearby while they’re working.

This guide features:

• Twenty-two succinct style principles.
• Advice on culturally appropriate publishing practices, including how to collaborate with Indigenous Peoples, when and how to seek the advice of Elders, and how to respect Indigenous Oral Traditions and Traditional Knowledge.
• Terminology to use and to avoid.
• Advice on specific editing issues, such as biased language, capitalization, and quoting from historical sources and archives.
• Case studies of projects that illustrate best practices.

Reviews
"Style is fraught with politics, especially when writing about Indigenous Peoples. Now, writers, academics, journalists, publishers, and students can breathe a sigh of relief. Reach for this essential Indigenous style guide, not only when searching for the right word, but when seeking guidance on the importance of relationships and trust." - Duncan McCue, CBC Radio Host and author of The Shoe Boy

"Elements of Indigenous Style is a beautiful beginning, a gathering place and a cultivator of both discussion and growth. Younging’s work clears the ground, drafts the blueprints and starts the framing out on the house that we need for our stories. At the same time, Younging manages to write both solid and grounded guidelines while leaving malleability in the architecture so that the ideas can grow and evolve. And we are all invited to share, discuss, add to, and cultivate this important work." - Cherie Dimaline, author and winner of the Governor General’s Literary Award

Educator Information
This book would be useful for the following courses and/or areas of studies from elementary to university: Indigenous Studies, Canadian Literature, Language Arts, English, Media Studies, Education, Journalism, Editing and Proofreading, Social Science/Ethnic Studies, and Composition and Creative Writing.

Recommended for Grades 3-12 for the following subject areas: English Language Arts, Indigenous Studies, Social Studies.  Also a useful Teacher's Resource.

Additional Information
168 pages | 5.50" x 7.50"

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Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

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Ensouling Our Schools: A Universally Designed Framework for Mental Health, Well-Being, and Reconciliation
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: University/College;

In an educational milieu in which standards and accountability hold sway, schools can become places of stress, marginalization, and isolation instead of learning communities that nurture a sense of meaning and purpose. In Ensouling Our Schools, author Jennifer Katz weaves together methods of creating schools that engender mental, spiritual, and emotional health while developing intellectual thought and critical analysis.

Kevin Lamoureux contributes his expertise regarding Indigenous approaches to mental and spiritual health that benefit all students and address the TRC Calls to Action.

Grade: For all teachers

Additional Information
200 pages | 8.00" x 10.50"

by Jennifer Katz | with Kevin Lamoureux | foreword by Ry Moran

Authentic Canadian Content
$40.00

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Environmental Activism on the Ground: Small Green and Indigenous Organizing
Editors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Indigenous Canadian;
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Environmental Activism on the Ground draws upon a wide range of interdisciplinary scholarship to examine small scale, local environmental activism, paying particular attention to Indigenous experiences. It illuminates the questions that are central to the ongoing evolution of the environmental movement while reappraising the history and character of late twentieth and early twenty-first environmentalism in Canada, the United States, and beyond. 

This collection considers the different ways in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous activists have worked to achieve significant change. It examines attempts to resist exploitative and damaging resource developments, and the establishment of parks, heritage sites, and protected areas that recognize the indivisibility of cultural and natural resources. It pays special attention to the thriving environmentalism of the 1960s through the 1980s, an era which saw the rise of major organizations such as Greenpeace along with the flourishing of local and community-based environmental activism. 

Environmental Activism on the Ground emphasizes the effects of local and Indigenous activism, offering lessons and directions from the ground up. It demonstrates that the modern environmental movement has been as much a small-scale, ordinary activity as a large-scale, elite one.

Reviews
"Environmental Activism on the Ground succeeds splendidly in complicating and enriching our understanding of modern environmentalism. Focusing on Indigenous and non-Indigenous activists in an impressive range of settings, Jonathan Clapperton and Liza Piper draw together and interpret diverse methodological and conceptual insights in a way that gives new, deserved prominence to those who have strived—and continue to strive—for environmental justice at the local level. These accounts left me both enlightened and heartened. Scholars from across the humanities and social sciences will welcome this volume." - Richard A. Rajala, Department of History, University of Victoria.

Educator Information

Table of Contents:

Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: In the Shadow of the Green Giants: Environmentalism and Civic Engagements - Jonathan Clappeton & Liza Piper

Part 1: Processes and Possibilities
1. Strategies for Survival: First Nations Encounters with Environmentalism - Anna J. Willow
2. Native/Non-Native Alliances: Challenging Fossil Fuel Industry Shipping at Pacific Northwest Ports - Zoltán Grossman
3. Conserving Contested Ground: Soverigenty-Driven Stewardship by the White Mountain Apache Tribe and the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation - Jon R. Welch
4. From Southern Alberta to Northern Brazil: Indigenous Conservation and the Preservation of Cultural Resources - Sterling Evans
5. Parks For and By the People: Acknowledging Ordinary People in the Formation, Protection, and Use of State and Provincial Parks - Jesica M. DeWitt

Part 2: Histories
6. Alternatives: Environmental and Indigenous Activism in the 1970s - Liza Piper
7. Marmion Lake Generating Station: Another Northern Scandal? - Tobasonakwut Peter Kinew
8. Environmental Activism as Anti-Conquest: The Nuu-chah-nulth and Environmentalists in the Contact Zone of Clayoquont Sound - Jonathan Clapperton
9. Local Economic Independence as Environmentalism: Nova Scotia in the 1970s - Mark Leeming
10. “Not an Easy Thing to Implement”: The Conservation Council of New Brunswick and Environmental Organization in a Resource-Dependent Province, 1969-1983 - Mark J. McLaughlin
11. The Ebb and Flow of Local Environmental Activism: The Society for Pollution and Environmental Control (SPEC), British Columbia - Jonathan Clapperton
12: From Scoieal Movement to Environmental Behemoth: How Greenpeace Got Big - Frank Zelko

Afterword: Lessons from the Ground Up - Jonathan Clapperton & Liza Piper
Bibliography
List of Contributors
Index

Additional Information
752 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

Authenticity Note: Because this work includes contributions from Indigenous peoples, it has been labelled as containing Authentic Indigenous Text.

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$39.99

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First Nations Teaching & Practices
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: University/College;

This booklet is intended to provide readers with a basic understanding of the traditional teachings and practices of Manitoba’s First Nations people. While this knowledge has always existed, it has become increasingly important to seek it, learn it and share it, in particular with children and youth. As our knowledge increases, so does the practice, honour and respect we have for one another and for these ancestral ways.

The tools and knowledge in this booklet provide the basic information needed to begin a journey in order to rediscover the original ways that have withstood the test of time. We have searched for this knowledge by going to our Elders who carry the gifts of culture, language, history, medicines and ceremonies.

$8.00

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