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Books For Girls

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Babs' Adventures: Christmas on the Trapline
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6;

Ten-year-old Babs Thompson’s dad is missing, and Babs and her brother, James, are determined to find him. With two of their sled dogs, Brutus and Kona, they set off on snowshoes into the forest, traveling many miles before finding their father – injured and surrounded by a pack of wolves!

Christmas on the Trapline is a children’s historical fiction set in the 1950’s near the Cree community of Norway House, Manitoba.

Educator Information
This book is the third book in the Babs' Adventures series, a chapter book series about a young Cree girl and her adventures.

Additional Information
69 pages | Paperback

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$14.95

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Babs' Adventures: Stranger at the Creek
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6;

When eight-year-old Babs Thompson and her brother, James, encounter a stranger in a secluded creek, they find a mystery, and many questions that have no answers. In the wilderness, miles away from civilization, a man has lived for twenty years, his desire for privacy earning him the title of hermit. With a gift for healing, his unknown past shrouded in mystery, the stranger at the creek has only one friend, Babs’ grandfather.

This beautifully bound hard-cover edition makes an excellent gift for librarians, teachers, parents and of course, children, who wish to learn more about Cree culture. Set in the 1950’s in a fictional Cree community, this book is an excellent example of how parents and grandparents of long ago taught a lot of lessons through local folklore, history, and story telling, weaving virtues throughout them. It was a good time when families were connected daily, especially in the evenings when they would spend time together.

Reviews
"Babs' Adventures is sure to be a hit with teachers and parents, as children enjoy Babs' exciting adventures while learning about Cree culture and life in the 1950s." - M. D. Meyer

Educator Information
This book is the first book in the Babs' Adventures series, a chapter book series about a young Cree girl and her adventures.

Additional Information
88 pages | Hardcover

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

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Babs' Adventures: The Storm on the Lake
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Cree (Nehiyawak);
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6;

Nine-year-old Babs Thompson and her ten-year-old brother James are so excited to be going for a trip on the S.S. Keenora with their mother and grandmother. Departing from Warren’s Landing, they will sail to Winnipeg where they will shop and visit a relative, Grandma’s sister, whom she hasn’t seen in years.

Aboard the S.S. Keenora, they meet and make a friend, a student who is going to residential school. The famous ten day heat wave of 1953 causes many on the ship to suffer from heat exhaustion – but it is nothing compared to what is in store for them on their way home!

Educator Information
This book is the second book in the Babs' Adventures series, a chapter book series about a young Cree girl and her adventures.

Additional Information
127 pages | Hardcover 

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$19.95

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Belle of Batoche
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Métis;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6;

Belle, an 11-year-old Métis girl, and Sarah both want the coveted job of church bell ringer. An embroidery contest is held to award the position, and Sarah cheats. Before Belle can expose her, the two are caught up in the advancing forces of General Middleton and his troops as they surround Batoche in the 1885 Riel Rebellion. The church bell disappeared that day and remains missing to this day.

Reviews
"This book can be a starting point for a more in-depth look at the Métis settlement and the struggle which ensued or it can be read just for enjoyment."— Resource Links, September 2004

Series Information
This book is part of the Orca Young Readers series, which are award-winning, bestselling chapter books for ages 8–11. Titles in this series include historical and contemporary stories with age-appropriate plots.

Additional Information
144 pages | 5.00" x 7.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$7.95

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Dragonfly Song
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

The girl has had many selves in her short life. The first she remembers is Aissa, the daughter of Mama and Dada, sister to Zufi who watched the goats. Then the Bull King's raiders came, and Mama said, "Don't make a sound till I come back." And when the villagers found her she was silent as stone, because Mama never came back again.

So the villagers cursed her as back luck and made her No-Name, lowest of the servants to the Lady, the island's priestess. But there were whispers, as she grew, of another self: of the Lady's rejected first daughter, born imperfect with two extra thumbs. The silent girl looks at the scars on her wrists and wonders, but she has more pressing concerns. The villagers blame her bad luck for the tribute the Bull King now demands of them: two youths given each spring to dance with his bulls and die for his god's glory. And the servants hate and fear the unnatural way the animals all come to her. For Aissa, though, this bond with creatures of fur and scale is the first clue in finding the true self that no one else can give to her, or take away.

Wendy Orr, the author of Nim's Island, introduces a resourceful and resilient heroine for slightly older readers. Inspired by an archeological trip to the island of Crete, where frescoes show figures leaping over the backs of bulls, Orr weaves an intriguing mythological portrayal of the Bronze Age Minoan civilization. Lyrically written and refreshingly unpredictable, Dragonfly Song suggests a fascinating origin for the legend of the Minotaur and his dark tribute.

Reviews
"Orr tells her tale in both narrative poetry and prose for an effect that is both fanciful and urgent, drawing a rich fantasy landscape filled with people and creatures worthy of knowing. An introductory note describes Orr's inspiration in the legend of the Minotaur, but her story is no retelling but a meditation on rejection and acceptance, on determination and self-determination. The shifts between poetry and prose build tension just as surely as the bull dances do. As mesmerizing as a mermaid's kiss, the story dances with emotion, fire, and promise."—Kirkus Reviews Starred Review

"The Bronze Age setting makes for a unique backdrop, and Aissa is a sympathetic character. Her struggles are heartrending, and made more so by the lyrical storytelling style. The descriptions of the dances are especially vivid. VERDICT: Hand-sell this unusual tale to fans of Shannon Hale's historical fantasies."—School Library Journal

"A retelling of the legend of the Minotaur, Orr tells Aissa's tale in a lyrical mix of narrative poetry and prose, using lush, vivid language to create an unparalleled fantasy world full of life and lively characters. While young readers with a special interest in history will immediately be drawn into this meticulously researched, literary story, its fast-paced, adventurous, epic feel will undoubtedly appeal to all readers."—Booklist

"The narrative style shifts between straightforward, lyrical prose and imagistic free-verse poetry, a technique that infuses the story with a dreamlike atmosphere. Both forms advance the action, but the poetry enhances the sense of intimacy by focusing attention on Aissa's impressionistic views of the world and her sense of isolation among the people who fear, bully, and reject her. Her ultimate triumph is credibly compromised, making this an unusually thoughtful offering in the middle-school mythology genre."—Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"[A] work of beauty. From the stunning cover to the mythological imagery and lyrical prose, readers are drawn in and carried along on an intense ride....Orr's language is gripping and enchanting, and Dragonfly Song would make a perfect read-aloud chapter book for middle grade teachers. While the academic cross-curricular subject areas are obvious, including history, mythology, religion, spirituality, even bullying, I enjoyed this story simply as a pleasure read. Readers will find that Dragonfly Song and its fearless heroine will stick with them long after the final chapter. Highly Recommended."—CM Magazine

"Dragonfly Song is an impressive work of middle-grade historical fiction. Aissa is a brave, tenacious girl, who rebels against the constraints of her life without appearing anachronistic. There isn't a lot of young people's fiction set in the Bronze Age, and the details here are lovingly researched, creating a transportive world. Especially noteworthy is the representation of religion in a pre-Christian setting, as the book explores both its beauty and brutality."—Quill & Quire

"[Dragonfly Song] was very original and creative....I also like that the book was partially written in poetry and partially written in prose. Books are usually one or the other, so I like how the author wove them together. I love how this story was very detailed, as I could picture almost everything. Overall, Dragonfly Song was an amazing book."—Farrah, Age 11, Kids' BookBuzz

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 10-14

Additional Information
408 pages | 5.50" x 7.80"

Authentic Canadian Content
$19.95

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Girl of the Southern Sea
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7;

For girls all over the world, fighting for the futures they deserve...

A girl from the slums of Jakarta dreams of an education and the chance at a better life. But first she must battle the dangers of local superstition and thwart her father's plan to marry her off to an older man.

From the time she was a little girl, Nia has dreamed up adventures about the Javanese mythical princess, Dewi Kadita. Now fourteen, Nia would love nothing more than to continue her education and become a writer. But high school costs too much. Her father sells banana fritters at the train station, but too much of his earnings go toward his drinking habit. Too often Nia is left alone to take over the food cart as well as care for her brother and their home in the Jakarta slums.

But Nia is determined to find a way to earn her school fees. After she survives a minibus accident unharmed and the locals say she is blessed with 'good luck magic,' Nia exploits the notion for all its worth by charging double for her fried bananas. Selling superstitions can be dangerous, and when the tide turns it becomes clear that Nia’s future is being mapped without her consent.

If Nia is to write a new story for herself, she must overcome more obstacles than she could ever have conceived of for her mythical princess, and summon courage she isn't sure she has.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 9-13

Includes a glossary of Indonesian terms.

An Author's Note at the end of the novel provides more context about the story in relation to the author's own life experiences, as well more information on global issues that affect girls all over the world like poverty, forced marriages, lack of education and healthcare.

Themes: Homelessness & Poverty; Self-Esteem & Self-Reliance; Drugs, Alcohol, Substance Abuse; People & Places (Asia, Indonesia); Legends, Myths, Fables (Asian).

Additional Information
224 pages | 5.50" x 8.00" | Glossary of Indonesian Terms | Map situating Indonesia

Authentic Canadian Content
$19.95

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Going Places
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

Twelve-year-old Jess and her friends have been playing hockey with the boys in Fort Desperation, Northwest Territories, since they were six years old. They'd like to start a girls' team in their community, but is tiny Fort Desperation ready for it? Somebody is trying to scare them off through acts of vandalism. Not only do Jess and her friends have to organize a team, find a coach and learn to play together, they have to unmask the Hockey Vandal. Can they do it before the Vandal destroys their team's hopes?

Educator Information
While some characters in this book are Indigenous, this book's Indigenous content is limited; therefore, it's listed as containing Non-Indigenous Content.

Series Information
This book is part of the Orca Young Readers series, which are award-winning, bestselling chapter books for ages 8–11. Titles in this series include historical and contemporary stories with age-appropriate plots.

Additional Information
128 pages | 5.00" x 7.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$7.95

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Hannah and the Salish Sea
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8;

In the second volume of the Hannah trilogy, summer has arrived, and fourteen-year-old Hannah Anderson is excited about spending it with Max (who has been giving her stomach butterflies lately). But things are happening in Cowichan Bay that Hannah can't explain. When a mysterious accident leads her to a nest of starving eaglets, she meets Izzy Tate, a young Métis girl staying in the village for the summer. Why is Izzy so angry all the time, and is it just a coincidence that she is the spitting image of Yisella, the Cowichan girl Hannah met the summer she was twelve? Hannah has even more questions. Why is Jack, her raven friend of First Nation legend, bringing her unusual "gifts" in the middle of the night? Is it all connected to a ring of poachers who have apparently moved into the valley? The eaglets are in danger and so are the Roosevelt elk. And what's with the Orca 1, the supposedly abandoned tuna boat anchored out in the bay? After Hannah and Max make a grisly discovery in the woods, they know they must take action. When Izzy agrees to join them on a midnight kayak trip, the three discover the unspeakable poaching secret on the Orca 1, and they are soon in a fight for their lives and the lives of the endangered animals being hunted for their parts.

Reviews
“Carol Anne Shaw provides young teen protagonists with contexts for their own parent and family issues, first attractions, peer pressures, jealousies, trust, and reactivity while learning to be themselves, not what others want them to be. . . . Within the framework of a gloriously natural setting, a First Nations history, and contemporary environmental issues, Hannah and the Salish Sea is sure to draw new readership from those who don’t want to relive too much angst in their books.” —CanLit for Little Canadians

“A delightful evocation of West Coast island life, complete with poachers, grow-ops, First Nations legends and two adventurous and confused fourteen-year-olds.” — John Wilson

Hannah & the Salish Sea pits three spirited teenagers against a gang of unsavory poachers and pot-growers. A quintessential west coast adventure story that’s part page-turner, part budding romance, and part homage to the traditional stories of the Cowichan First Peoples.” —Nikki Tate

Series Information
This is the second book in the Hannah Series, a juvenile fiction novel series.

Additional Information
200 pages | 5.50" x 7.63

Authentic Canadian Content
$11.95

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Hannah and the Spindle Whorl
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8;

When twelve-year-old Hannah uncovers an ancient Salish spindle whorl hidden in a cave near her home in Cowichan Bay, she is transported back to a village called Tl'ulpalus, in a time before Europeans had settled in the area. Through the agency of a trickster raven, Hannah befriends Yisella, a young Salish girl, and is welcomed into village life. Here she discovers that the spindle whorl is the prize possession of Yisella's mother, Skeepla, a famous spinner and weaver. When Skeepla falls victim to smallpox, Hannah finally begins to open up about the death of her own mother.

Hannah and Yisella are then accidentally left behind when the villagers journey to the mainland, and they witness the arrival of Governor James Douglas and numerous settlers on the Hecate. As the settlers pillage the village for souvenirs, Hannah and Yisella rescue the spindle whorl and, pursued by the ship's crew, escape into the dark forest. From the refuge in the cave, Hannah returns to her own time with a greater understanding of herself and the history of the First Nations.

Series Information
This is the first book in the Hannah Series, a juvenile fiction novel series.

Additional Information
244 pages | 5.50" x 7.63"

Authentic Canadian Content
$12.95

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Hannah and the Wild Woods
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Salish;
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8;

It's spring break, and 14-year-old Hannah Anderson is glad to be spending it with the "Coast-Is-Clear" program - a group committed to cleaning Pacific Rim National Park's beaches of debris leftover from the tragic Japanese tsunami of 2011. Soon after Hannah arrives on the west coast, Jack, her raven sidekick, finds a small object washed up in the surf: a strange glass ball marked with a glowing Japanese character. Immediately, unusual things start to happen, beginning with the arrival of the mysterious "Kimiko," a Japanese girl with a secret past. Kimiko, it turns out, is a kitsune fox whose magic depends on the glass ball she lost in the tsunami. As Kimiko works alongside Hannah and the other members of her crew, she becomes increasingly unhappy with her life as an immortal kistsune and longs to join a family of humans. Can Hannah and her trickster raven help to make it happen?

Series Information
This is the third book in the Hannah Series, a juvenile fiction novel series.

Additional Information
240 pages | 5.50" x 7.63"

Authentic Canadian Content
$11.95

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If I Go Missing
Format: Hardcover
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations; Anishinaabeg; Ojibway;
Grade Levels: 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12;

Combining graphic fiction and non-fiction, this young adult graphic novel serves as a window into one of the unique dangers of being an Indigenous teen in Canada today. The text of the book is derived from excerpts of a letter written to the Winnipeg Chief of Police by fourteen-year-old Brianna Jonnie — a letter that went viral and was also the basis of a documentary film. In her letter, Jonnie calls out the authorities for neglecting to immediately investigate missing Indigenous people and urges them to "not treat me as the Indigenous person I am proud to be," if she were to be reported missing.

Indigenous artist Neal Shannacappo provides the artwork for the book. Through his illustrations he imagines a situation in which a young Indigenous woman does disappear, portraying the reaction of her community, her friends, the police and media.

An author's note at the end of the book provides context for young readers about Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 12 - 18. 

Additional Information
64 pages | 8.50" x 9.50" | 100+ 2-colour illustrations

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
Authentic Indigenous Artwork
$24.95

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Joy of Apex
Artists:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; Inuit;
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7;

Joy is ten years old, living in Apex, Nunavut--a suburb of Iqaluit--and loving life. Her little sister Allashua may be annoying, but all in all Joy loves living at the top of the world in Apex.

But when Joy begins to notice her parents fighting a lot more than usual, and her mom staying with her sisters in Iqaluit more than she is home, Joy's perfect life soon becomes a lot more complicated.

As Joy navigates her parents' separation and its affect on her family, she learns some valuable lessons about how to cope when life gets tough. Told in the wry, funny voice of a smart and savvy ten-year-old girl, this book will appeal to young readers everywhere.

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 9-12

Additional Information
104 pages | 5.50" x 8.50" | b&w illustrations

Authentic Canadian Content
Authentic Indigenous Text
$9.95

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Lucky Break
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

Seventeen-year-old Lucy "Lucky" Graves is devoted to her championship rugby team, but her dreams of a scholarship are destroyed when she breaks her leg during an important game. If it doesn't heal properly, Lucy could be benched for the rest of the year. Goodbye pro career, goodbye college, goodbye future. Without rugby, who is she? Now her anxiety is getting worse, and a past trauma has resurfaced to haunt her. Lucy needs to get real about what happened when she was twelve, and about what it really means to be a team player.

Reviews
"A good book about women in sport and has enough romance and family drama to interest other readers. Highly Recommended." — CM Magazine, July 2018

"Clever, quippy dialogue and enjoyable first-person voice make the sassy, inner-monologuing Lucy a pleasure of a protagonist…Bonus points are given for winning subplot involving a goofball math teacher, and a sweet, sincere look at the complexities of female friendship between competitive athletes. This book tackles a lot and scores at every turn."— Booklist, August 2018

Educator & Series Information
This book is part of the Orca Sports series. Orca Sports stories engage middle-schoolers and teens with fast-paced plots and easy-to-read language. Topics include a variety of team and individual sports. Reading levels from grade 2.0 to 4.5; Interest level ages 10+.

Additional Information
184 pages | 7.00" x 4.25"

Authentic Canadian Content
$9.95

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Molly's Promise
Authors:
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous Canadian; First Nations;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6;

When Molly learns a talent competition is coming to town, her friend Murphy (A Different Game, Murphy and Mousetrap) becomes her manager. Molly is certain she is a good singer—she has been singing in her head for as long as she can remember. She doesn't sing out loud because of a promise she made to herself. Years ago, Molly vowed that her mom would be the first one to hear her sing. The only problem is, Molly knows nothing about her mom, who left when Molly was a baby. With the talent competition only weeks away, she has to decide whether to break her promise to herself and let her voice out into the world, or wait for her mother's uncertain return before singing for anyone else.

Reviews
"An elementary school audience [will be able to] relate to Molly's struggles...Recommended." — CM Magazine, February 2013

"In this small book with a lot of story packed into it, readers will enjoy the high drama...[and] relate to Molly’s uncertainty as she tries something completely new." — School Library Journal, May 2013

"An accessible, easy-to-read text with surprising depth...Deals quietly with issues like race, class, various kinds of sickness, and how families differ. The novel should generate lots of conversation in a class or reading group...A smart selection for anyone who has ever struggled with a secret or worried about being different. It's also an inspiring story of a girl who's learning to get along despite difficult circumstances. Many readers will identify with and enjoy Molly's story." — Resource Links, April 2013

Educator Information
Themes: singing, competition, friendship, family, absent parent.

Series Information
This book is part of the Orca Young Readers series, which are award-winning, bestselling chapter books for ages 8–11. Titles in this series include historical and contemporary stories with age-appropriate plots.

Additional Information
136 pages | 5.00" x 7.50"

Authentic Canadian Content
$7.95

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Swallow's Dance
Authors:
Format: Hardcover
Grade Levels: 5; 6; 7; 8; 9;

Leira is about to start her initiation as a priestess when her world is turned upside down. A violent earthquake leaves her home--and her family--in pieces. And the earth goddess hasn't finished with the island yet.

With her family, Leira flees across the sea to Crete, expecting sanctuary. But a volcanic eruption throws the entire world into darkness. After the resulting tsunami, society descends into chaos; the status and privilege of being noble-born are reduced to nothing. With her injured mother and elderly nurse, Leira must find the strength and resourcefulness within herself to find safety.

A thrilling new Bronze Age survival story from the award-winning author of Dragonfly Song and Nim's Island.

Reviews
"[Orr's] mixture of prose and free verse to tell Leira's story is lyrical and magnetic—and devastating. Not for readers searching for a simple or happy journey, this is a beautiful song of a book that shows that life isn't always fair, but change is always constant."—Kirkus Reviews

"Leira's lyrical first-person narrative advances the story along beautifully with a fitting sense of urgency, and free-verse songs clue readers in to her emotional development. Immersive historical fiction."—Booklist Starred Review

"Some chapters written in verse make the more emotional plotlines sing. An eye-opening look at how difficult it is when one's status changes in life, and how attitude can shape outcome. VERDICT: Beautiful writing and a fast-moving plot will give young historical fiction fans much to love."—School Library Journal

"Leira's protracted fall from grace is effectively punctuated by seamless narrative shifts among prose, verse, and song, which fans of Orr's Dragonfly Song will recognize. What she endures—the uncertainty of her family's fate and becoming a servant herself—makes for a gripping exploration of privilege during her journey toward womanhood."—Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books

"Swallow's Dance is a sweeping tale of courage, fortitude, hardship and perseverance against all odds. It is also a coming of age story, an intimate glimpse into the life of a young girl adjusting to puberty at a time when her family, friendships and her understanding of her place in the world are brutally torn apart. Wendy Orr has crafted a sympathetic, memorable heroine whose struggles and challenges transcend time from the Bronze Age to modern day....While suitable for middle-grade students and a wonderful introduction to mythology and discussions surrounding puberty, spirituality, class, mental health, death and disaster, Swallow's Dance is one of those rare books that is also just a great story, an epic tale for all ages. Highly Recommended."—CM Magazine

"Top notch historical fiction for those who like it ancient!... The scenes of devastation – earthquake in Santorini, tsunami in Crete – are riveting to experience through the lens of a survivor."—Youth Services Book Review

"Orr's attention to character development is extremely well done....Swallow's Dance could be used in conjunction with the grades-five-to-eight Language Arts or Social Studies curriculum and would be great to teach students how to incorporate symbolism and imagery through free verse and poetry. In addition, Swallow's Dance could also be used to teach students about family, culture, history and the importance of the role of women in society. A fantastic novel to use as a read-aloud or novel study!"—Canadian Children's Book News

Educator Information
Recommended Ages: 10-14

Themes/Subjects: Legends, Myths, Fables - Greek & Roman / Historical - Ancient Civilizations / Action & Adventure - Survival Stories / Coming of Age.

Additional Information
288 pages | 5.50" x 8.00"

Authentic Canadian Content
$19.95

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