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Teen Books
The Turtle Warrior
Authors:
Mary Relindes Ellis
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Anishinaabeg; Ojibwe;

Ernie and Rosemary Morriseau, a childless couple, he part Ojibwa, live on a farm outside Olina, Wisconsin, next to John and Claire Lucas and their two sons. By 1967 the Lucas farm has fallen into disrepair. John Lucas began drinking as soon as he got out of the army in World War Two, and has never stopped. He brutalizes his wife and his two children, James and Bill, drinks up most of the money he makes at his part-time jobs and generally horrifies his neighbors the Morriseaus, who do what they can to offer a safe haven to the two boys. Bill, the younger brother, creates a shield fashioned out of the shell of a giant turtle, which he believes, with his handmade wooden sword, will help him fend off danger. His older brother James enlists in the marines to escape his father but dies in Vietnam. Bill, who remains home to protect his mother, is brutalized and damaged by his father, but protected by the spirit of his dead brother, he manages to survive into manhood and eventually marries and creates a family of his own. When he does, it is one that extends to include not only his mother but also the elderly neighboring Morriseau couple.

The Turtle Warrior is a work of fiction created from the layers of life in a surprisingly isolated region, a landscape of multiple ethnicities forgotten by most of America. In her gorgeous writing of the natural world, Ellis illuminates through fiction her deeply held belief that like animals, children, in an effort to survive, instinctively seek from their physical environment and from others what their own families cannot provide; and that as the traditional Ojibwa have always known, wisdom and clarity can come from a turtle.

$16.50

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Books
Dream Catchers: Legend, Lore and Artifacts
Authors:
Cath Oberholtzer
Format: Paperback

An investigation into the symbol of Native heritage.

In Ojibwe (or Chippewa in the United States) culture a dream catcher is a hand-crafted willow hoop with woven netting that is decorated with sacred and personal items such as feathers and beads. The Native American tradition of making dream catchers--hoops hung by the Ojibwe on their children's cradleboards to "catch" bad dreams--is rich in history and tradition.

Although the exact genesis of this intriguing artifact is unknown, legend has it that a medicine woman forms a circle from a willow branch and, with sinew, borrows the pattern from a spider, weaves a web, and hangs it over the bed of a sick child who recovers by morning. In some versions dream catchers catch good dreams and let bad ones through, while others catch bad dreams and let good dreams through. This legend accompanies dream catchers offered for sale across North America and beyond.

These themes, among others, are carried throughout this book which explores the appropriation of dream catchers by Native Americans of different nations, as well as the New Age movement. Dream Catchers also discusses the blending of two religious philosophies whereby Native and Christian icons are mixed.

More than 40 color photographs feature contemporary dream catchers and artifacts with informative captions that identify and comment on the different patterns, their significance and history. Dream Catchers features the work of Native artist Nick Huard who creates dream catchers in his studio in Kahnawake outside of Montreal.

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$19.95

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Books
The Plague of Doves: Deluxe Modern Classic
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Anishinaabeg; Ojibwe;

Louise Erdrich’s mesmerizing novel, her first in almost three years, centers on a compelling mystery. The unsolved murder of a farm family haunts the small, white, off-reservation town of Pluto, North Dakota. The vengeance exacted for this crime and the subsequent distortions of truth transform the lives of Ojibwe living on the nearby reservation and shape the passions of both communities for the next generation. The descendants of Ojibwe and white intermarry, their lives intertwine; only the youngest generation, of mixed blood, remains unaware of the role the past continues to play in their lives.

Evelina Harp is a witty, ambitious young girl, part Ojibwe, part white, who is prone to falling hopelessly in love. Mooshum, Evelina’s grandfather, is a seductive storyteller, a repository of family and tribal history with an all-too-intimate knowledge of the violent past. Nobody understands the weight of historical injustice better than Judge Antone Bazil Coutts, a thoughtful mixed blood who witnesses the lives of those who appear before him, and whose own love life reflects the entire history of the territory. In distinct and winning voices, Erdrich’s narrators unravel the stories of different generations and families in this corner of North Dakota. Bound by love, torn by history, the two communities’ collective stories finally come together in a wrenching truth revealed in the novel’s final pages.

The Plague Of Doves is one of the major achievements of Louise Erdrich’s considerable oeuvre, a quintessentially American story and the most complex and original of her books.

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Books
The Round House: A Novel
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Anishinaabeg; Ojibwe;

One Sunday in the spring of 1988, a woman living on a reservation in North Dakota is attacked. The details of the crime are slow to surface because Geraldine Coutts is traumatized and reluctant to relive or reveal what happened, either to the police or to her husband, Bazil, and thirteen-year-old son, Joe. In one day, Joe's life is irrevocably transformed. He tries to heal his mother, but she will not leave her bed and slips into an abyss of solitude. Increasingly alone, Joe finds himself thrust prematurely into an adult world for which he is ill prepared.

While his father, a tribal judge, endeavors to wrest justice from a situation that defies his efforts, Joe becomes frustrated with the official investigation and sets out with his trusted friends, Cappy, Zack, and Angus, to get some answers of his own. Their quest takes them first to the Round House, a sacred space and place of worship for the Ojibwe. And this is only the beginning.

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$19.99

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Books
Tracks
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Anishinaabeg; Ojibwe;

Set in North Dakota at a time in the past century when Indian tribes were struggling to keep what little remained of their lands, Tracks is a tale of passion and deep unrest. Over the course of ten crucial years, as tribal land and trust between people erode ceaselessly, men and women are pushed to the brink of their endurance—yet their pride and humor prohibit surrender. The reader will experience shock and pleasure in encountering characters that are compelling and rich in their vigor, clarity, and indomitable vitality.

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$18.50

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Books
The Dog’s Children: Anishinaabe Texts told by Angeline Williams
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: University/College;

In 1941, Angeline Williams, an Anishinaabe elder left her home on an island in the St. Mary’s River between Michigan and Ontario and travelled south to North Caroline to teach the Ojibwe (Chippewa) language. At the Linguistic Institute, a summer school of linguistics, Angeline Williams spoke words and sentences and told anecdotes and stories to give the students practice in transcribing an analyzing the structure of an unwritten language.

The Dog’s Children includes twenty stories dictated to the class and the teaching staff, Charles F. Voegelin, and Leonard Bloomfield, as later edited by Bloomfield. The manuscript from which this edition has been prepared is now at the National Anthropological Archives at the Smithsonian Institution. Presented in Ojibwe, with English translations by Bloomfield. The volume also contains an Ojibwe-English glossary and other linguistic study aids.

Reviews
"This book is tremendously valuable as a tool for understanding not only linguistic research but for understanding the life and culture of an Ojibwe woman. Angeline Williams, Biidaasigekwe or "Sunlight Woman," came to Virginia in 1941 from Sugar Island on the St. Mary's River to teach the Ojibwe language to Leonard Bloomfield. Bloomfield's subsequent translations and understanding of the Algonquian language family led to significant advances and changes in the study of linguistics. This series of Ojibwe stories and their up-to-date translations to English illustrate the thoroughness of Bloomfield's linguistic research.... The Ojibwe word inaajimowin means "story" in English. Throughout this book, Angeline Williams weaves Ojibwe "stories" that are influenced by myth, regionality, and family. The oral quality of her stories is rich in meaning and humor. More important these stories remain as an ethnographic record of her life and her contributions tofurther cultural understanding of the Ojibwe people. The updated version of Bloomfield's notes and the orthography installed by Nichols serves to enhance the fine translations and culturally rich Ojibwe stories. The notes on inflectional endings and the glossary with a dictionary of Ojibwe-to-English and English-to-Ojibwe translations make the book even more valuable as a linguistic resource tool. The mirror-like lay-out of the book also aids in understanding the translations. With alternating pages of Ojibwe and English, it is easy to compare the translations paragraph by paragraph, even line by line." - Paul C. Brooke, Department of English, Iowa State University

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268 pages | 6.00" x 9.00"

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$32.95

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Teen Books
Love Medicine
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12;

(Newly Revised)
The stunning first novel in Louise Erdrich's Native American series, Love Medicine tells the story of two families, the Kashpaws and the Lamartines. Written in Erdrich's uniquely poetic, powerful style, it is a multi-generational portrait of strong men and women caught in an unforgettable drama of anger, desire, and the healing power that is love medicine.

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$17.99

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Books
LaRose
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 12; University/College;

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award in Fiction

Finalist for the 2017 PEN Faulkner Award

In this literary masterwork, Louise Erdrich, the bestselling author of the National Book Award-winning The Round House and the Pulitzer Prize nominee The Plague of Doves wields her breathtaking narrative magic in an emotionally haunting contemporary tale of a tragic accident, a demand for justice, and a profound act of atonement with ancient roots in Native American culture.

North Dakota, late summer, 1999. Landreaux Iron stalks a deer along the edge of the property bordering his own. He shoots with easy confidence—but when the buck springs away, Landreaux realizes he’s hit something else, a blur he saw as he squeezed the trigger. When he staggers closer, he realizes he has killed his neighbor’s five-year-old son, Dusty Ravich.

The youngest child of his friend and neighbor, Peter Ravich, Dusty was best friends with Landreaux’s five-year-old son, LaRose. The two families have always been close, sharing food, clothing, and rides into town; their children played together despite going to different schools; and Landreaux’s wife, Emmaline, is half sister to Dusty’s mother, Nola. Horrified at what he’s done, the recovered alcoholic turns to an Ojibwe tribe tradition—the sweat lodge—for guidance, and finds a way forward. Following an ancient means of retribution, he and Emmaline will give LaRose to the grieving Peter and Nola. “Our son will be your son now,” they tell them.

LaRose is quickly absorbed into his new family. Plagued by thoughts of suicide, Nola dotes on him, keeping her darkness at bay. His fierce, rebellious new “sister,” Maggie, welcomes him as a coconspirator who can ease her volatile mother’s terrifying moods. Gradually he’s allowed shared visits with his birth family, whose sorrow mirrors the Raviches’ own. As the years pass, LaRose becomes the linchpin linking the Irons and the Raviches, and eventually their mutual pain begins to heal.

But when a vengeful man with a long-standing grudge against Landreaux begins raising trouble, hurling accusations of a cover-up the day Dusty died, he threatens the tenuous peace that has kept these two fragile families whole.

Inspiring and affecting, LaRose is a powerful exploration of loss, justice, and the reparation of the human heart, and an unforgettable, dazzling tour de force from one of America’s most distinguished literary masters.

Paperback: 400 pages
Physical Dimensions: 5.31" x 8.00"

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$19.99

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Teen Books
Lies to Live By
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 10; 11;

Lies To Live By brings together two selections of stories by Ojibwe storyteller Lois Beardslee. "Lies to Live By, " a series of interdependent tales, reflects the storyteller's role in interpreting traditional stories for contemporary audiences, while preserving traditions based not in mysticism but in pragmatism. In "Calm Days, " three generations--the narrator, her grandfather, and her son, spend a week together on a remote island during the course of which they demonstrate the continuity of Ojibwe life. Together these stories weave the contemporary and the traditional to show how cultural diversity can be preserved even as cultural boundaries are transcended.

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Kids Books
The Birchbark House Series (book 1): The Birchbark House
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Anishinaabeg; Ojibwe;
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7;

Her name is Omakayas, or Little Frog, because her first step was a hop, and she lives on an island in Lake Superior. It is 1850 and the lives of the Ojibwe have returned to a familiar rhythm: they build their birchbark houses in the summer, go to the ricing camps in the fall to harvest and feast, and move to their cozy cedar log cabins near the town of LaPointe before the first snows.

Satisfying routines of Omakayas's days are interrupted by a surprise visit from a group of desperate and mysterious people. From them, she learns that all their lives may drastically change. The chimookomanag, or white people, want Omakayas and her people to leave their island in Lake Superior and move farther west. Omakayas realizes that something so valuable, so important that she never knew she had it in the first place, is in danger: Her home. Her way of life.

Series Information
This is the first book in the Birchbark House Series, a series of Indigenous juvenile fiction novels written by Ojibwe writer Louise Erdrich. The Birchbark House Series follows a character known as Omakayas and her Ojibwe community.

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244 pages | 6.37" x 9.37"

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$7.99

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Kids Books
The Mishomis Book: The Voice of the Ojibway
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: 4; 5; 6; 7;

For young readers, the collected wisdom and traditions of Ojibway elders.

The Ojibway is one of the largest groups of Native Americans, belonging to the Anishinabe people of what is today the northern United States and Canada. The Mishomis Book documents the history, traditions, and culture of the Ojibway people through stories and myths passed down through generations. Written by Ojibway educator and spiritual leader Edward Benton-Banai, and first published in 1988, The Mishomis Book draws from the traditional teachings of tribal elders to instruct young readers about Ojibway creation stories and legends, the origin and importance of the Ojibway family structure and clan system, the Midewiwin religion, the construction and use of the water drum and sweat lodge, and modern Ojibway history.

Written for readers from all cultures -but especially for Ojibway and Native youth- The Mishomis Book provides an introduction to Ojibway culture and an understanding of the sacred Midewiwin teachings, aiming to protect this knowledge by instilling its importance in a new generation. Encouraging the preservation of a way of life that is centered on respect for all living things, these vibrant stories about life, self, community, and relationship to nature are just as relevant to the modern reader as they were hundreds of years ago.

Reviews
"A truly significant effort—every tribe should support this kind of writing about their history and traditions." —Vine Deloria, Jr

Additional Information
114 pages | 8.50" x 8.50"

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$30.50

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Kids Books
The Birchbark House Series (book 2): The Game of Silence
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Anishinaabeg; Ojibwe;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

Her name is Omakayas, or Little Frog, because her first step was a hop, and she lives on an island in Lake Superior.It is 1850, and the lives of the Ojibwe have returned to a familiar rhythm: they build their birchbark houses in the summer, go to the ricing camps in the fall to harvest and feast, and move to their cozy cedar log cabins near the town of LaPointe before the first snows.

The satisfying routines of Omakayas's days are interrupted by a surprise visit from a group of desperate and mysterious people. From them, she learns that all their lives may drastically change. The chimookomanag, or white people, want Omakayas and her people to leave their island in Lake Superior and move farther west. Omakayas realizes that something so valuable, so important that she never knew she had it in the first place, is in danger: Her home. Her way of life.

In this captivating sequel to National Book Award nominee The Birchbark House, Louise Erdrich continues the story of Omakayas and her family.

Series Information
This is the second book in the Birchbark House Series, a series of Indigenous juvenile fiction novels written by Ojibwe writer Louise Erdrich. The Birchbark House Series follows a character known as Omakayas and her Ojibwe community.

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288 pages | 5.12" x 7.62"

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$9.25

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Kids Books
The Birchbark House Series (book 3): The Porcupine Year
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Anishinaabeg; Ojibwe;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

Here follows the story of a most extraordinary year in the life of an Ojibwe family and of a girl named "Omakayas," or Little Frog, who lived a year of flight and adventure, pain and joy, in 1852.

When Omakayas is twelve winters old, she and her family set off on a harrowing journey. They travel by canoe westward from the shores of Lake Superior along the rivers of northern Minnesota, in search of a new home. While the family has prepared well, unexpected danger, enemies, and hardships will push them to the brink of survival. Omakayas continues to learn from the land and the spirits around her, and she discovers that no matter where she is, or how she is living, she has the one thing she needs to carry her through.

Richly imagined, full of laughter and sorrow, The Porcupine Year continues Louise Erdrich's celebrated series, which began with The Birchbark House, a National Book Award finalist, and continued with The Game of Silence, winner of the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction.

Series Information
This is the third book in the Birchbark House Series, a series of Indigenous juvenile fiction novels written by Ojibwe writer Louise Erdrich. The Birchbark House Series follows a character known as Omakayas and her Ojibwe community.

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224 pages | 5.12" x 7.62"

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$8.95

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Kids Books
The Birchbark House Series (book 4): Chickadee
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Anishinaabeg; Ojibwe;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

Winner of the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction, Chickadee is the first novel of a new arc in the critically acclaimed Birchbark House series by New York Times bestselling author Louise Erdrich.

Twin brothers Chickadee and Makoons have done everything together since they were born—until the unthinkable happens and the brothers are separated.

Desperate to reunite, both Chickadee and his family must travel across new territories, forge unlikely friendships, and experience unexpected moments of both unbearable heartache and pure joy. And through it all, Chickadee draws from the strength of his namesake, the chickadee, to carry him home.

Chickadee continues the story of one Ojibwe family's journey through one hundred years in America. In a starred review, School Library Journal proclaimed, "Readers will be more than happy to welcome little Chickadee into their hearts."

The paperback edition includes additional material, such as an interview with the author and activities. This story of Chickadee and his family is based on Louise Erdrich’s own family history.

Series Information
This is the fourth book in the Birchbark House Series, a series of Indigenous juvenile fiction novels written by Ojibwe writer Louise Erdrich.

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224 pages | 5.12" x 7.62"

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$8.50

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Kids Books
The Birchbark House Series (book 5): Makoons
Format: Paperback
Text Content Territories: Indigenous American; Native American; Anishinaabeg; Ojibwe;
Grade Levels: 3; 4; 5; 6; 7;

In this award-winning sequel to Chickadee, acclaimed author Louise Erdrich continues her celebrated Birchbark House series with the story of an Ojibwe family in nineteenth-century America.

Named for the Ojibwe word for little bear, Makoons and his twin, Chickadee, have traveled with their family to the Great Plains of Dakota Territory.

There they must learn to become buffalo hunters and once again help their people make a home in a new land. But Makoons has had a vision that foretells great challenges—challenges that his family may not be able to overcome.

Based on Louise Erdrich’s own family history, this fifth book in the series features black-and-white interior illustrations, a note from the author about her research, and a map and glossary of Ojibwe terms.

Reviews
“Erdrich continues her excellent storytelling. She has a knack for creating humorous and endearing characters. This beautiful novel is quick moving and deeply affecting. Readers will thoroughly enjoy following Makoons and learning about Ojibwe life.”— School Library Journal (starred review)

“Warm intergenerational moments abound. Erdrich provides fascinating information about Ojibwe daily life. Readers will be enriched by Erdrich’s finely crafted corrective to the Eurocentric dominant narrative of America’s past.”— Horn Book (starred review)

“Erdrich’s simple text and delicate pencil illustrations provide a detailed, honest portrait of Plains life. A warm and welcome addition to the unfolding saga of a 19th-century Ojibwe family.”— Kirkus Reviews

Series Information
This is the fifth book in the Birchbark House Series, a series of Indigenous juvenile fiction novels written by Ojibwe writer Louise Erdrich.

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192 pages | 5.12" x 7.62"

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$8.50

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Kids Books
The Legend of the Ladyslipper
Authors:
Lise Lunge-Larsen
Margi Preus
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: Kindergarten; 1; 2;

The lady slipper grows in the northern woods to mark the courage and strength of a small girl who lived there long ago - a girl who saved her people from a terrible disease by listening carefully to the whispering snow, the rumbling ice, and the dancing northern lights. Illustrated with paintings as graceful and delicate as the lady slipper itself, this unforgettable retelling shows how a child's lost slippers became one of nature's most lovely spring flowers.

Awards:

* 2000 -- Notable Children's Trade Book in Social Studies
* 1999 -- Great Lakes Book Award Finalist

Reviews
"The Ojibwa tell a story of the moccasin flower, called lady slipper in English, a beautiful woodland blossom. First-time children's authors but longtime storytellers Lunge-Larsen and Preus use native sources and tell the sweet legend in a powerful way. The only one left whole when a devastating disease strikes her village, a girl sets out in deep winter to a neighboring village to get healing herbs to save the sick. She does not stay the night but starts back immediately and is caught in drifted snow. The snow whispers, "Be wise!" and she figures out, like the fox, how to free herself. But her fur-lined moccasins are left behind. She perseveres, with frozen and bleeding feet, to save her village. In the spring, when she returns to look for her moccasins, she finds instead a patch of small pink-and-white flowers shaped like the shoes. Clear, limpid colors enhance the decorative effect of the illustrations, whose lively line and use of pattern are reminiscent of beadwork. An authors' note and bibliography are included, and the authors particularly thank several Ojibwa language scholars for their assistance in the cadences of the language." - Booklist

$10.99

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Kids Books
Grandmother's Dreamcatcher
Authors:
Becky Ray McCain
Artists:
Stacey Schuett
Format: Paperback
Grade Levels: Preschool; Kindergarten; 1; 2; 3;

While Kimmy's parents look for a house close to Daddy's job, Kimmy stays with her Chippewa grandmother. The bad dreams she has had still bother her. But with her grandmother's help, she learns about dreamcatchers.

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32 pages | 8.00" x 10.00"

$10.99

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