The Land is Our Storybook Series

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At the Heart of It: Dene dzó t’áré
Format: Hardcover
, 2011
  • Raymond Taniton is Sahtugot'ine, which means "people from the Sahtu or Great Bear Lake." He lives in Deline, Northwest Territories, on the shore of Sahtu, Canada's largest and most pristine lake. Raymond, former chief, is one of his community's many gifted leaders.

    In At the Heart of It, the seventh book in The Land is Our Storybook series, Raymond shows readers how to make a traditional Dene drum with the help of his father, Alfred, who is a leader and the "keeper of the drum." Raymond shares the importance of keeping traditions alive to maintaining a healthy community. He also introduces readers to Dene spiritual, political, and traditional leaders and explains why Deline is a leader in the NWT in terms of healthy places, people, and land. Sahtugot'ine have never given up their right and responsibility to look after and govern themselves. Join Raymond and find out what is at the heart of the rich history of the Sahtugot'ine.

$16.95

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Come and Learn With Me: Ewo, seh Kedjdjh
Format: Hardcover
, 2009
  • Nine-year-old Sheyenne lives in Sambaa K''e, Northwest Territories-that's Trout Lake in English. Come learn with her as she takes you on a journey to her community in the fall, the season of moose.


    This is the fourth book in the popular series "The Land Is Our Storybook" and features the Dehcho region of the Dene. "The Land Is Our Storybook" is a series of books about the lands and cultures of Canada''s Northwest Territories. In the books, storytellers, elders, and cultural leaders from the ten regions in the Territories share real stories of everyday life in the North today.

$16.95

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Living Stories: Godi Weghaa Ets' Eeda
Format: Hardcover
, 2009
  • The third title in The Land is Our Storybook series,

    by and about the people of the Northwest Territories, for readers at grade 4 - 7 level.

    In Living Stories, Therese Zoe translates the stories and traditional wisdom of Tlicho Elders Philip Zoe and Elizabeth Chocolate.

    Therese Zoe is a Tlicho woman from Gamèti in the Northwest Territories. She is a community health representative, a mother and grandmother, as well as a champion of ancestral skills and stories. In Living Stories, Therese shares her love for her community and translates the sacred stories and traditional wisdom of her brother-in-law, Philip Zoe, and his sister, Elizabeth Chocolate. As Therese writes, "You might look at our lands and think they are empty, but we do not go hungry. The land gives us our food and our shelter. It holds our stories and our histories. It gives us everything we need."

    Join Tlicho young people, Shelinda, Forest, and Bradley, as they learn about making dry-fish, bows and arrows, and birch-bark baskets; the practices of old-time healers; as well as the sacred stories that tell the history of the Tlicho people. Some of the stories Philip relates in this book have never been written down before - his versions of sacred stories are a gift to young readers across Canada, to be used wisely. The Tlicho Nation was the first in the Northwest Territories to gain self-government. With Elders such as Philip and Elizabeth passing along their traditional wisdom to the young, as well as knowledge gained since the Tlicho first encountered European peoples, the Tlicho are showing how they are, "strong like two people."

    The Land Is Our Storybook is a first-ever series of ten books for children about the diverse lands and cultures of Canada''s Northwest Territories. Mindy Willett, an educational consultant and former teacher from Yellowknife, has worked with storytellers-Elders and cultural leaders-from ten regions in the territory to capture real stories of everyday life as it exists today. Told in a uniquely diverse range of northern voices, with a child-centred approach, books in The Land Is Our Storybook series highlight each official Aboriginal language group in the NWT, revealing a richly textured picture of life in the North-on the trapline, around the campfire, in communities, at school, and within the outdoor school that is the land itself. The series celebrates the seasons, ages, genders, traditional activities, and communities of the NWT. The stories are illustrated by the striking images of acclaimed northern photographer, Tessa Macintosh and depict the similarities in lifestyle between children of the North and South, as well as the marked cultural differences, and highlight the special relationship these First Nations people have with the land and how they are adapting to rapid change while remaining connected to the land. Images of the landscape and animals within it, of trapping, hunting, fishing, and bannock baking sit alongside pictures of children at school, swimming at recreation centres, and reading in libraries. Here is modern northern culture painted beautifully: a complex mix of the new and the old.

    These wonderful books, written with a variety of provincial and territorial curricula in mind, are specially designed for the classroom and include special features such as glossaries relating details on animals biology and cultural definitions, regional and language maps. The text of the stories also have sidebars such as Our Stories, which contain the stories of the people and language group featured, and Our Words, which highlight words in the featured language that are important to the story.

    The first two books in this ground-breaking series were published in Spring 2008 and are suitable for grades four to eight. The tenth and final book in the series will come with a CD of stories told in the languages featured in the books and a teacher''s guide for the entire series.

$16.95

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No Borders: Kigliqangittuq
Format: Hardcover
, 2013
  • No Borders shares the life of Darla Evyagotailak, a 16 year old Inuk girl. Through Darla's life readers will get a glimpse into the intricately connected families of Inuit living in the communities of Kugluktuk, Nunavut and Ulukhaktok, NWT. Although recently divided by the border between the two territories the communities share a common ancestry and their language called Inuinnaqtun. The border is invisible to them however, and as Darla's Grandfather tells her, 'we are just like the caribou, they don't see the border and neither do we'.

    Darla Evyagotailak is a 16 year old girl from Kugluktuk, Nunavut. She enjoys soccer, square dancing and her favourite subject in school is drafting. Raised by her maternal grandparents with lots of time spent with her great-grandparents, Darla has had the opportunity to be connected with the strength of her ancestors. In No Borders, Darla accompanies her grandmother and great grandparents on a journey which crosses the border between the community of her birth and the lands of her ancestors.

$19.95

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Proud to Be Inuvialuit: Quviahuktunga Inuvialuugama
Format: Hardcover
, 2010
  • James Pokiak is proud to be Inuvialuit, which means "real people."

    The Inuvialuit are the most westerly Canadian Inuit. James lives in the hamlet of Tuktoyuktuk, NWT, which is above the Arctic Circle on the shore of the Arctic Ocean. The community is often just called Tuk to save time. Even though he lives in town now, James grew up on the land, learning the traditional values and survival skills of his people.

    In this book, the fifth in the The Land is Our Storybook series, James and his daughter, Rebecca, go on a trip to harvest beluga whale. Harvesting and preparing beluga meat together as a family is an integral part of what it means to be Inuvialuit. Join James and Rebecca and learn about how the beluga whale is interlinked with Inuvialuit culture and history.

$16.95

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The Delta Is My Home
Format: Hardcover
, 2008
  • Canadian Information Book Award Finalist 2009

    Canadian Children''s Book Centre Our Choice, 2009

    Silver Birch Express nominee, 2010

    Tom McLeod is an eleven-year-old boy from Aklavik who is a gifted storyteller heard frequently on CBC Radio North. He is of mixed cultural heritage-Gwich'in and Inuvialuit.

    Tom tells us why his home in the Mackenzie Delta is a special place and why he loves to live on the land. He describes how his town floods in the spring and why he loves "ratting" (trapping muskrats) and hunting "black ducks" (white-winged and surf scoters) in the Delta. Readers will learn why these ducks are decreasing in number and how and why they are important to Tom and his people.

    Tom says, "Northerners have always hunted animals for survival. We are careful about how we use the land. To be good hunters we need to pay attention to what is happening on the land around us-that's why it's important for us to be out there. We are the first to know if the land and animals are changing."

$16.95

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