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A Native American Thought of It
Format: Paperback
, 2008
  • Inventiveness and ingenuity from North America's First Nations.

    Everyone knows that moccasins, canoes and toboggans were invented by the Aboriginal people of North America, but did you know that they also developed their own sign language, as well as syringe needles and a secret ingredient in soda pop?

    Depending on where they lived, Aboriginal communities relied on their ingenuity to harness the resources available to them. Some groups, such as the Iroquois, were particularly skilled at growing and harvesting food. From them, we get corn and wild rice, as well as maple syrup.

    Other groups, including the Sioux and Comanche of the plains, were exceptional hunters. Camouflage, fish hooks and decoys were all developed to make the task of catching animals easier. And even games-lacrosse, hockey and volleyball -- have Native American roots.

    Other clever inventions and innovations include:

    * Diapers
    * Asphalt
    * Megaphones
    * Hair conditioner
    * Surgical knives
    * Sunscreen.

    With descriptive photos and information-packed text, this book explores eight different categories in which the creativity of First Nations peoples from across the continent led to remarkable inventions and innovations, many of which are still in use today.

$9.95

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Arctic A to Z
Author: Wayne Lynch
Format: Paperback
, 2009
  • A beautifully illustrated dictionary of 26 key aspects of life in the Arctic.

    World-class photographer and science writer Wayne Lynch takes readers to one of his favorite parts of the world: the Arctic.

    Using a plant, an animal or a phenomenon for each letter of the alphabet, Lynch describes the unique ways in which systems for living differ where temperature and light can be amazingly extreme. But Lynch also dispels the myth of the Arctic as a perpetually frozen landscape by introducing us to the birds, mammals, insects and plant life that thrive in the short yet glorious sun-filled days of summer.

$7.95

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At the Heart of It: Dene dzó t’áré
Format: Hardcover
, 2011
  • Raymond Taniton is Sahtugot'ine, which means "people from the Sahtu or Great Bear Lake." He lives in Deline, Northwest Territories, on the shore of Sahtu, Canada's largest and most pristine lake. Raymond, former chief, is one of his community's many gifted leaders.

    In At the Heart of It, the seventh book in The Land is Our Storybook series, Raymond shows readers how to make a traditional Dene drum with the help of his father, Alfred, who is a leader and the "keeper of the drum." Raymond shares the importance of keeping traditions alive to maintaining a healthy community. He also introduces readers to Dene spiritual, political, and traditional leaders and explains why Deline is a leader in the NWT in terms of healthy places, people, and land. Sahtugot'ine have never given up their right and responsibility to look after and govern themselves. Join Raymond and find out what is at the heart of the rich history of the Sahtugot'ine.

$16.95

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Come and Learn With Me: Ewo, seh Kedjdjh
Format: Hardcover
, 2009
  • Nine-year-old Sheyenne lives in Sambaa K''e, Northwest Territories-that's Trout Lake in English. Come learn with her as she takes you on a journey to her community in the fall, the season of moose.


    This is the fourth book in the popular series "The Land Is Our Storybook" and features the Dehcho region of the Dene. "The Land Is Our Storybook" is a series of books about the lands and cultures of Canada''s Northwest Territories. In the books, storytellers, elders, and cultural leaders from the ten regions in the Territories share real stories of everyday life in the North today.

$16.95

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Environmentalists from our First Nations
Format: Paperback
, 2011
  • Like the other books in the First Nations Series for Young Readers, this books offers ten short and engaging biographies of First Nations/Native activists who advocate not only for the environment but for Native rights. Their stories are full of highs and lows, triumphs and setbacks. Environmental trailblazers, these men and women are role models for children everywhere.

    The men and women profiled here are united by their work to protect the environment and to support indigenous rights. Their stories take us from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska to the Black Mesa in Arizona.

    Melina Laboucan-Massimo uses her passion to stop oil extraction in Alberta’s tar sands.
    Winona LaDuke is a voice for reclaiming Native lands, advocating renewable energy resources, and protecting Native cultures.
    Clayton Thomas-Muller is a dynamic advocate for indigenous self-determination and campaigner against tar sands extraction.
    Ben Powless brings his youthful energy and skills to addressing climate change issues.
    Tom Goldtooth protects sacred sites and organizes global direct-action campaigns for the environment.
    Grace Thorpe is a grandmother who dedicated her retirement years to keeping Native reservations from becoming nuclear waste dumps.
    Sarah James is a voice from northern Alaska defending the Porcupine caribou herd and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
    Enei Begaye & Evon Peter are married activists who work as a team on environmental issues and sustainable strategies for Native people.
    Klee Benally uses the media to empower Native communities in their fight for environmental justice.
    Teague Allston works to ensure a tribal voice is heard in Washington DC.

$10.95

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Frozen Land
Author: Jan Reynolds
Format: Paperback
, 2007
  • Kenalogak, a young Inuit girl, is helping her father build an igloo. Her family sleeps in this ice home while they are hunting caribou, an animal very important to her people. While Father is hunting and Mother is sewing coats of skin, Kenalogak and her brother play games and go ice fishing. Inside the igloo at night Grandmother and Grandfather lead the family in songs and dances. Kenalogak enjoys learning the traditional ways of her people and their land.

$13.95

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Great Athletes From Our First Nations
Format: Paperback
, 2007
  • Great Athletes from our First Nations profiles thirteen outstanding athletes in such diverse sports as figure skating, race car driving, skiing and bowling. The athletes featured in this book include: Ross Anderson, downhill skier; Richard Dionne, champion basketball player; Mike Edwards, professional bowler; Shelly Hruska, professional ringette player; Beau Kemp, professional baseball player, etc. Ages 7-9

$10.95

In Re-Print
Great Musicians From Our First Nations
Format: Paperback
, 2010
  • Follow the journeys of ten talented musicians from the Native community as they make their way to the top. All of them, whether their music is traditional drumming or mainstream rock, bring their own cultural traditions to their music.

    Rising stars Shane Yellowbird and Crystal Shawanda are steeped in country music. The Blackfire band combines punk rock with Dine’ music, while Four Rivers Drum has been drumming at powwows for more than fourteen years. Leela Gilday is an award-winning folk artist and Michael Bucher’s music protects sacred sites. Contrast classical guitarist Gabriel Ayala with rock guitarist Mato Nanji and learn about the talents of jazz vocalist Jamie Coon and Native American flutist Mary Youngblood.

$10.95

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Great Women From Our First Nations
Author: Kelly Fournel
Format: Paperback
, 2007
  • The book profiles ten outstanding women leaders in the Native community. All of these successful, trailblazing women are stellar role models who have raised the profile of indigenous culture in North America. From heroines of the past to women making new history today, this exciting work of nonfiction reminds readers of the extraordinary contributions of Native Americans to our daily lives. Ages 7 and up.

$10.95

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How To Build An Igloo: And Other Snow Shelters
Format: Paperback
, 2007
  • How are the ice blocks of igloos so perfectly formed and fitted, and able, it's been said, to withstand the weight of a polar bear? How can you determine if the fresh snow that's fallen outside your front door is as good for making a slab shelter as a snowman? What is a slab shelter, anyway? For that matter, what are drift caves, spruce traps, snow block walls, and bivy bag shelters, and how would you go about building them, whether for winter fun or protection from the weather?

    In this instructive, whimsical, illustrated manual, Norbert E. Yankielun, a seasoned cold-regions explorer and researcher, takes readers step-by-step through the process of constructing and inhabiting a range of useful snow structures, from the most basic to the more complex. Whether you're a veteran back country skier or a backyard builder, this is one book you won't want to be without. 100 black-and-white line drawings

$22.50

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How To Tell a Legend
Author: Janet Stone
Format: Paperback
, 2011
  • A legend is a story about a hero, a people, or a natural phenomena. Popular legends include King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, Blackbeard, and Robin Hood. This exciting new title teaches readers about the common characteristics found in legends from around the world. Engaging writing activities guide readers as they use these characteristics to create their own legends.

$9.95

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How To Tell a Myth
Author: Robert Walker
Format: Paperback
, 2011
  • A myth is a story that attempts to explain a natural phenomena—such as how the world was created. Myths often include supernatural characters who have extraordinary powers. How To Tell a Myth is an engaging title that introduces readers to myths from around the world and highlights the common elements that make up this genre. Step-by-step instructions help readers create their own myths.

$9.95

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Island Kids
Author: Tara Saracuse
Format: Paperback
, 2010
  • This is a history of British Columbia's island children, told in their voices, from their perspectives. Composed of twenty-two stories, Island Kids is a snapshot of a period and place in time. The topics range from quintessentially coastal experiences, like a day at the beach, to stories that deal with serious issues, such as BC's history of residential schools, but they all remain true to the experience of the children telling the story. At the end of each chapter is a section called "What do we know for sure?" that gives the reader greater depth and context. The stories are written in a dynamic and authentic voice and are aimed at readers aged eight to twelve.

    Unlike history that has either been fictionalized or told from an adult's perspective, the Courageous Kids series brings history to kids in their own words. Truly original, Kidmonton, Rocky Mountain Kids, and Island Kids strive to communicate the events and emotions of kids.

$12.95

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Jason's New Dugout Canoe
Format: Hardcover
, 2000
  • The long-awaited sequel to BC children's classic Jason and the Sea Otter.

    This delightful story of a Nuu-chah-nulth boy explores First Nations traditions and values through the making of a canoe. Jason's first canoe is crushed during a storm, and he must replace it. Through Uncle Silas, he learns the traditional methods of canoe building - plus scores of stories and legends about his heritage. In an entertaining way, Jason's New Dugout Canoe also teaches the important lesson of patience, plus respect and reverence for nature and all its creatures.

    The story is packed with stunning, full-colour illustrations by Paul Montpellier, which one reviewer has described as "wonderfully clear and detailed, capturing both closeness to nature and a sense of continuity of Native tradition."

$18.95

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Living Stories: Godi Weghaa Ets' Eeda
Format: Hardcover
, 2009
  • The third title in The Land is Our Storybook series,

    by and about the people of the Northwest Territories, for readers at grade 4 - 7 level.

    In Living Stories, Therese Zoe translates the stories and traditional wisdom of Tlicho Elders Philip Zoe and Elizabeth Chocolate.

    Therese Zoe is a Tlicho woman from Gamèti in the Northwest Territories. She is a community health representative, a mother and grandmother, as well as a champion of ancestral skills and stories. In Living Stories, Therese shares her love for her community and translates the sacred stories and traditional wisdom of her brother-in-law, Philip Zoe, and his sister, Elizabeth Chocolate. As Therese writes, "You might look at our lands and think they are empty, but we do not go hungry. The land gives us our food and our shelter. It holds our stories and our histories. It gives us everything we need."

    Join Tlicho young people, Shelinda, Forest, and Bradley, as they learn about making dry-fish, bows and arrows, and birch-bark baskets; the practices of old-time healers; as well as the sacred stories that tell the history of the Tlicho people. Some of the stories Philip relates in this book have never been written down before - his versions of sacred stories are a gift to young readers across Canada, to be used wisely. The Tlicho Nation was the first in the Northwest Territories to gain self-government. With Elders such as Philip and Elizabeth passing along their traditional wisdom to the young, as well as knowledge gained since the Tlicho first encountered European peoples, the Tlicho are showing how they are, "strong like two people."

    The Land Is Our Storybook is a first-ever series of ten books for children about the diverse lands and cultures of Canada''s Northwest Territories. Mindy Willett, an educational consultant and former teacher from Yellowknife, has worked with storytellers-Elders and cultural leaders-from ten regions in the territory to capture real stories of everyday life as it exists today. Told in a uniquely diverse range of northern voices, with a child-centred approach, books in The Land Is Our Storybook series highlight each official Aboriginal language group in the NWT, revealing a richly textured picture of life in the North-on the trapline, around the campfire, in communities, at school, and within the outdoor school that is the land itself. The series celebrates the seasons, ages, genders, traditional activities, and communities of the NWT. The stories are illustrated by the striking images of acclaimed northern photographer, Tessa Macintosh and depict the similarities in lifestyle between children of the North and South, as well as the marked cultural differences, and highlight the special relationship these First Nations people have with the land and how they are adapting to rapid change while remaining connected to the land. Images of the landscape and animals within it, of trapping, hunting, fishing, and bannock baking sit alongside pictures of children at school, swimming at recreation centres, and reading in libraries. Here is modern northern culture painted beautifully: a complex mix of the new and the old.

    These wonderful books, written with a variety of provincial and territorial curricula in mind, are specially designed for the classroom and include special features such as glossaries relating details on animals biology and cultural definitions, regional and language maps. The text of the stories also have sidebars such as Our Stories, which contain the stories of the people and language group featured, and Our Words, which highlight words in the featured language that are important to the story.

    The first two books in this ground-breaking series were published in Spring 2008 and are suitable for grades four to eight. The tenth and final book in the series will come with a CD of stories told in the languages featured in the books and a teacher''s guide for the entire series.

$16.95

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