Aboriginal PALS

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A Man Called Raven
Format: Paperback
, 1997
  • A man appears to two boys who have injured a raven & tells them the story of the terrible consequences that befell a man who did the same thing.

$13.95

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Caring For Me series: Living Safe, Playing Safe
Author: Karen W. Olson
Format: Paperback
, 2009
  • Tony, Rainey, Jennifer, and Mavis love playing, with the help of their parents, they learn important safety lessons at school, in the kitchen and in the playground.

$10.95

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Caring For Me series: Looking After Me
Author: Denise Lecoy
Format: Paperback
, 2009
  • A sweet story about a young Quail who learns life lessons about laughing, crying, anger, hurt, happiness, fear, trust, love and standing up for one self.

$10.95

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Ch'askin: Legend of the Sechelt People
Author: Donna Joe
Traditional Territory: Sechelt
Format: Paperback
, 2003
  • Ch'askin is the great thunderbird whose appearance heralds rumbling thunder, a darkening sky and flashes of lightning as well as good luck for the people of the Sechelt Nation.

    This compelling book recounts how this enormous and awe-inspiring bird who looks like a golden eagle except much, much larger — aided and protected the members of the Sechelt villages for many years in many ways. From helping Chief Spelmu'lh, the father of the Sechelt Nation, build both the first longhouse and the many villages of his people, to delivering goats and grizzly bears for the hungry people to eat and creating islands from pebbles for the tired Sechelt hunters to rest, the story of Ch'askin is a story of protection, friendship and respect for fellow living beings.

$7.95

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Frog Girl
Author: Paul Owen Lewis
Format: Paperback
, 2003
  • When frogs suddenly vanish from a lake behind a village on the Northwest Coast, a nearby volcano awakens and an native girl is called to a dangerous adventure. Following the rich mythic traditions of Native peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast, the stories often tell of individuals cast mysteriously into parallel worlds inhabited by animals in human form.

$9.95

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Giving Thanks
Traditional Territory: Akwesasne Mohawk, Cayuga, Tuscarora
Format: Paperback
, 1995
  • The Mohawk tradition teaches children to start each day by giving thanks to Mother Earth, in keeping with the belief that the natural world is a precious and rare gift, and that the universe represents one great family.

$15.95

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How Raven Stole the Sun (Tales of the People)
Author: Maria Williams
Traditional Territory: Tlingit
Format: Hardcover
, 2001
  • A long time ago, Raven was pure white, like fresh snow in winter. This was so long ago that the only light came from campfires, because a greedy chief kept the stars, moon, and sun locked up in elaborately carved boxes. Determined to free them, the shape-shifting Raven resourcefully transformed himself into the chief's baby grandson and cleverly tricked him into opening the boxes and releasing the starlight and moonlight. Though tired of being stuck in human form, Raven maintained his disguise until he got the chief to open the box with the sun and flood the world with daylight, at which point he gleefully transformed himself back into a raven. When the furious chief locked him in the house, Raven was forced to escape through the small smokehole at the top--and that's why ravens are now black as smoke instead of white as snow.

    This engaging Tlingit story is brought to life in painted illustrations that convey a sense of the traditional life of the Northwest Coast peoples.

$23.00

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How The Robin Got Its Red Breast
Traditional Territory: Sechelt
Format: Paperback
, 1993
  • These traditional teaching legends come straight from the oral traditions of the Sechelt Nation.

$7.95

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I Help/Niwechihaw
Traditional Territory: Cree, Tahltan
Format: Hardcover
, 2008
  • Written and illustrated by members of the Tahltan and Cree nations, this sweet, simple story looks at a very special relationship. A young boy goes for a walk with his kohkom, or grandmother, listening, picking, praying, eating . . . just as she does. In doing so, he begins to learn the rich cultural traditions and values of his Cree heritage.

    Leona Neilson's thoughtful text and Caitlin Dale Nicholson’s acrylic-on-canvas illustrations blend beautifully to show both the deep bond between the boy and his grandmother and the beauty of their world. Poetic, resonant text makes this an ideal read-aloud for young ears.

$18.95

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Kou-Skelowh - We Are The People: A Trilogy of Okanagan Legends
Traditional Territory: Okanagan
Format: Paperback
, 2008
  • How Turtle Set the Animals Free is a surprising tortoise-and-hare legend with far-flung consequences. How Food Was Given describes the care and sacrifice of the four Chiefs of plant and animal life devoted to the new people who will soon come to Earth.

    Barb Marchand's vital, expressive watercolours bring the creatures alive. Her adroit portrayal of self-important Coyote in the telling but hilarious How Names Were Given adds to his personality. The touching humanity of this story is the stuff of great legends.

    And Marchand's illustrations echo the compassionate but musical voice that tells this story.—Elizabeth MacCallum, Children's Book Reviewer, The Globe and Mail

    Awards

    B.C. Millennium Book Awards
    2000 Winner of the B.C. Millennium Book Awards

$18.95

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Little Bear's Vision Quest
Author: Diane Silvey
Traditional Territory: Sechelt
Format: Paperback
, 2001
  • Little Bear's Vision Quest

    A full colour story book that teaches respect for others. The paintings were done by Joe Silvey (Salish). The book deals with name calling, initially showing the main character, Little Bear, as selfish and inconsiderate of others’ feelings. The book is a modern First Nations legend applying the traditional method of using stories as a teaching tool. Little Bear learns to value the traditions of his ancestors and through the daily ritual of cleansing himself becomes in tune with nature. The book can be used by teachers, parents and other caring adults to teach children the value of respect. Discussion questions are included for parents and teachers.

$15.00

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Mayuk The Grizzly Bear
Traditional Territory: Sechelt
Format: Paperback
, 1993
  • From the Publisher
    These traditional teaching legends come straight from the oral traditions of the Sechelt Nation. Simple enough to be understood by young children, yet compelling enough for adults, they are gentle, beautifully presented cautionary tales. You''ll want to read them again and again - and you''ll learn a few words of the Shishalh language while you''re at it. Charlie Craigan is a young Sechelt artist who works in a tiny studio set up in his bedroom. He studied traditional wood carving with Sechelt Nation carvers, but learned to draw and paint by studying books.
    About the Author
    The Sechelt Nation, a division of the Coast Salish family of First Nations, originally occupied the southern portion of what is now known as the Sunshine Coast of BC. At the time of contact with Europeans, the shishalh (Sechelt people) were a populous and peaceful people occupying some 80 scattered village sites. Estimates of original population range from 5,000 to 20,000, but by the time of the first official census in 1881, the Sechelt population had plunged to 167, mainly due to introduced …+ read moreThe Sechelt Nation, a division of the Coast Salish family of First Nations, originally occupied the southern portion of what is now known as the Sunshine Coast of BC. At the time of contact with Europeans, the shishalh (Sechelt people) were a populous and peaceful people occupying some 80 scattered village sites. Estimates of original population range from 5,000 to 20,000, but by the time of the first official census in 1881, the Sechelt population had plunged to 167, mainly due to introduced diseases. In this century, the band staged a remarkable comeback. Today the Sechelt are one of Canada''s most progressive First Nations groups, running a number of successful businesses. In 1986 the passage of Bill C-93 made the Sechelt Indian Band the first in Canada to achieve self-government. The band now numbers more than 1,000 members, about half of whom live on band lands.

$7.95

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Morning On The Lake
Format: Paperback
, 1999
  • A young boy and his grandfather set out in a birchbark canoe early one spring morning. Under the patient and gentle guidance of his grandfather, the boy gradually comes to respect the ways of nature and to understand his own place in the world

$7.95

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My Kokum Called Today
Author: Iris Loewen
Format: Paperback
, 2008
  • A telephone call from her grandmother has a young native girl in the city looking forward to visiting the reserve. In gentle, joyous ways we see how women, especially grandmothers, are often the spiritual glue when families are divided by long miles.

$10.95

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Nanabosho, The Birth of
Author: Joe McLellan
Format: Paperback
, 1989
  • The first title in the series shows how Nanabosho came to earth to teach respect for all living things.

$5.50

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