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A Story as Sharp as a Knife
Format: Paperback
, 2011
  • A seminal collection of Haida myths and legends; now in a gorgeous new package.

    The linguist and ethnographer John Swanton took dictation from the last great Haida-speaking storytellers, poets and historians from the fall of 1900 through the summer of 1901. Together they created a great treasury of Haida oral literature in written form.

    Having worked for many years with these century-old manuscripts, linguist and poet Robert Bringhurst brings both rigorous scholarship and a literary voice to the English translation of John Swanton's careful work. He sets the stories in a rich context that reaches out to dozens of native oral literatures and to myth-telling traditions around the globe.

    Attractively redesigned, this collection of First Nations oral literature is an important cultural record for future generations of Haida, scholars and other interested readers. It won the Edward Sapir Prize, awarded by the Society for Linguistic Anthropology, and it was chosen as the Literary Editor's Book of the Year by the Times of London.

    Bringhurst brings these works to life in the English language and sets them in a context just as rich as the stories themselves one that reaches out to dozens of Native American oral literatures, and to mythtelling traditions around the world.

$24.95

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Akaitsinikssiistsi: Blackfoot Stories of Old
Format: Paperback
, 2014
  • This collection of eight stories represents an introduction to Niits'powahsini, the Blackfoot language, and includes a pronunciation guide and Blackfoot-to-English glossary.

    In these stories Ikkinainihki, "Gentle Singer," recalls events from childhood and tells of her Elders, the cold weather of the Plains, a crying spirit, rattlesnakes, and more. This collection opens with a prayer and a small essay on the importance of preserving Niitsi'powahsini.

    Blackfoot Stories of Old will be of great value to native speakers, new learners, linguists, and those looking for insights into the Blackfoot people, who live in present-day Alberta and Montana.

$24.95

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Anishinaabemowin Maajaamigad: Learning Ojibwe
Format: Paperback
, 2009
  • The title, ‘Anishinaabemowin Maajaamigad—The Anishinaabe Language Leaves’ describes what can happen when Anishinaabemowin is no longer a part of everyday life. It encourages speakers today to revitalize the language.

    Set in the 1940’s on Manitoulin Island, ‘the place of the spirits’, this story celebrates veterans who gave their lives to end a World War, and the survivors who built a hockey arena to help young people understand the importance of memories and community.

    Our goal is for readers to understand each and every word and begin to use this beautifully complex language.

    This book is a resource to be used by students and teachers working to restore Anishinaabemowin to its rightful place—which is in the homes and in the hearts of people young and old who take the time to listen and learn the language.

    A CD is included so you can hear the correct pronunciation of the story.

$29.95

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Cedar Child: Hear the Teachings
Author: Annie Ashamock
Format: Paperback
, 2007
  • Annie Ashamock has written this stong, moving story about an Aboriginal woman’s life experiences. It is a story with a unifying theme that is shared throughout the different Aboriginal cultures of Turtle Island.

    The traditional oral teachings and method of storytelling is recreated in the accompanying bonus CD-Rom that tells the same story in two different Aboriginal languages, Cree and Ojibwe. The reader can follow along and hear the story being told in the different languages.

$24.95

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Cree: Words (2 Volume Set)
Author: Arok Wolvengrey
Format: Paperback
, 2001
  • This two-volume Cree dictionary documents the Cree language. It provides both a guide to its spoken form for non-speakers and a guide to its written forms (both SRO and Syllabics) for speakers and non-speakers alike. The goal has thus been to collect the vocabulary of Cree as it is spoken by fluent speakers in much of western Canada, whether elders or young people. The words recorded herein have been gathered from diverse sources, including elicitation, recorded conversations and narrative, and publications of many kinds.

$69.95

In Re-Print
Dancing on Our Turtle's Back
Author: Leanne Simpson
Format: Paperback
, 2011
  • Many promote Reconciliation as a “new” way for Canada to relate to Indigenous Peoples. In Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence, and a New Emergence activist, editor, and educator Leanne Simpson asserts reconciliation must be grounded in political resurgence and must support the regeneration of Indigenous languages, oral cultures, and traditions of governance.

    Simpson explores philosophies and pathways of regeneration, resurgence, and a new emergence through the Nishnaabeg language, Creation Stories, walks with Elders and children, celebrations and protests, and meditations on these experiences. She stresses the importance of illuminating Indigenous intellectual traditions to transform their relationship to the Canadian state.

    Challenging and original, Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back provides a valuable new perspective on the struggles of Indigenous Peoples.

$19.95

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Defying Maliseet Language Death: Emergent Vitalities of Language, Culture, and Identity in Eastern Canada
Format: Hardcover
, 2011
  • Published through the Recovering Languages and Literacies of the Americas initiative, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
    Today, indigenous communities throughout North America are grappling with the dual issues of language loss and revitalization. While many communities are making efforts to bring their traditional languages back through educational programs, for some communities these efforts are not enough or have come too late to stem the tide of language death, which occurs when there are no remaining fluent speakers and the language is no longer used in regular communication. The Maliseet language, as spoken in the Tobique First Nation of New Brunswick, Canada, is one such endangered language that will either be revitalized and survive or will die off.
    Defying Maliseet Language Death is an ethnographic study by Bernard C. Perley, a member of this First Nation, that examines the role of the Maliseet language and its survival in Maliseet identity processes. Perley examines what is being done to keep the Maliseet language alive, who is actively involved in these processes, and how these two factors combine to promote Maliseet language survival. He also explores questions of identity, asking the important question: “If Maliseet is no longer spoken, are we still Maliseet?” This timely volume joins the dual issues of language survival and indigenous identity to present a unique perspective on the place of language within culture.

$68.95

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Dictionary of Word Origins: The Histories of More Than 8,000 English-Language Words
Author: John Ayto
Format: Paperback
, 2011
  • What is the link between map and apron, acrobat and oxygen, zeal and jealousy, flour and pollen, secret and crime? Did you know that crimson originally comes from the name of tiny scale insects, the kermes, from whose dried bodies a red dyestuff is made? That Yankee began as a nickname for Dutchmen? That omelette evolved from amulette, a thin sheet of metal, and is a not-too- distant cousin of the word laminate? That jeans find their antecedent in jean fustian, meaning a cotton fabric from Genoa? The Dictionary of Word Origins uncovers the hidden and often surprising connection between words. Written in a clear and informative style, the more than 8,000 articles reveal the origins of and links between some of the most common English-language words. They also contain an extensive selection of words whose life histories are intrinsically fascinating or instructive. This dictionary shows how modern English has developed from its Indo-European roots and how the various influences on the language from migration and invasion to exploration, trade, technology, and scholarship have intermingled. It is an invaluable addition to any English or linguistics library.

$19.95

In Re-Print
From Oral to Written: A Celebration of Indigenous Literature in Canada, 1980-2010
Author: Tomson Highway
Traditional Territory: Cree
Format: Paperback
, 2017
  • Aboriginal Canadians tell their own stories, about their own people, in their own voice, from their own perspective.

    If as recently as forty years ago there was no recognizable body of work by Canadian writers, as recently as thirty years ago there was no Native literature in this country. Perhaps a few books had made a dent on the national consciousness: The Unjust Society by Harold Cardinal, Halfbreed by Maria Campbell, and the poetry of Pauline Johnson and even Louis Riel. Now, three decades later, Native people have a literature that paints them in colours that are psychologically complex and sophisticated. They have a literature that validates their existence, that gives them dignity, that tells them that they and their culture, their ideas, their languages, are important if not downright essential to the long-term survival of the planet.

    Tomson Highway’s From Oral to Written is a study of Native literature published in Canada between 1980 and 2010, a catalogue of amazing books that sparked the embers of a dormant voice. In the early 1980s, that voice rose up to overcome the major obstacle Native people have as writers: they are not able to write in their own Native languages, but have to write in the languages of the colonizer, languages that simply cannot capture the magic of Native mythology, the wild insanity of Trickster thinking. From Oral to Written is the story of the Native literary tradition, written – in multiple Aboriginal languages, in French, and in English – by a brave, committed, hard-working, and inspired community of exceptional individuals – from the Haida Nation on Haida Gwaii to the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia’s Cape Breton Island.

    Leading Aboriginal author Tomson Highway surveys the first wave of Native writers published in Canada, highlighting the most gifted authors and the best stories they have told, offering non-Native readers access to reconciliation and understanding, and at the same time engendering among Native readers pride in a stellar body of work.

    QUOTES OF NOTE

    “We gratefully acknowledge the work of those artists who have come before, and those that continue, building bridges across our cultures through their authentic words. Tomson Highway’s readings each demonstrate that within our stories, we pass along our teachings and we build upon the strength inside each one of us. We are arriving. Back to our lands, back to our stories, back to our truths, unwrapping old words and sharing wisdom. We, are coming home.”
    —Terri Mack, Strong Nations

    “A rich compilation of Indigenous literature that will be a gift for Canadian school curriculums, also well suited for those Canadians in search of understanding and reconciliation. More importantly this book is what Indigenous people need because, like me, they will discover their lives in the many stories. If I had this as a teenager, I would have understood that I was not alone in the darkness I lived. I would have seen that others found a way out. Bravo, Tomson Highway!”
    ―Bev Sellars, author of They Called Me Number One: Secrets and Survival at an Indian Residential School and Price Paid: The Fight for First Nations Survival

    ABOUT T

$29.95

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Funny Little Stories / wawiyatacimowinisa
Author: Arok Wolvengrey
Format: Paperback
, 2007
  • This is the first in a series of readers in the First Nations languages of the prairie provinces meant for language learners and language users. The stories in this volume come from a variety of sources, all being narrated or written by fluent speakers of Cree, whether students or instructors of the Cree language or Elders, and representing a wide array of dialect differences including examples of Plains, Woods and Swampy Cree.

$12.95

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Indigenous Screen Cultures in Canada
Format: Paperback
, 2010
  • Indigenous media challenges the power of the state, erodes communication monopolies, and illuminates government threats to indigenous cultural, social, economic, and political sovereignty. Its effectiveness in these areas, however, is hampered by government control of broadcast frequencies, licensing, and legal limitations over content and ownership.

    Indigenous Screen Cultures in Canada explores key questions surrounding the power and suppression of indigenous narrative and representation in contemporary indigenous media. Focusing primarily on the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, the authors also examine indigenous language broadcasting in radio, television, and film; Aboriginal journalism practices; audience creation within and beyond indigenous communities; the roles of program scheduling and content acquisition policies in the decolonization process; the roles of digital video technologies and co-production agreements in indigenous film making; and the emergence of Aboriginal cyber-communities.

$27.95

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Indigenous Storywork
Format: Paperback
, 2008
  • Jo-ann Archibald worked closely with Coast Salish Elders and storytellers, who shared both traditional and personal life-experience stories, in order to develop ways of bringing storytelling into educational contexts. Indigenous Storywork is the result of this research and it demonstrates how stories have the power to educate and heal the heart, mind, body, and spirit. It builds on the seven principles of respect, responsibility, reciprocity, reverence, holism, interrelatedness, and synergy that form a framework for understanding the characteristics of stories, appreciating the process of storytelling, establishing a receptive learning context, and engaging in holistic meaning-making.

$43.95

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Inuinnaqtun English Dictionary
Author: Gwen Angulalik
Format: Paperback
, 2013
  • The only Inuinnaqtun-language dictionary in Canada, this indispensible reference compiles nearly two thousand terms in Inuinnaqtun and English. With definitions and terms in both languages, this dictionary will b a reliable resource for both native speakers of, and newcomers to, the language of the Kitikmeot region of Nunavut.

    Originally published in 1996, this version has been revised and updated by the original editor.

$24.95

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La Lawng: Michif Peekishkwewin (Volume 1)
Format: Paperback
, 2004
  • This is an easy-to-follow guide to Michif. Rita Flamand and Norman Fleury are your guides as they walk you through the basics of the language.

$8.99

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Making Wawa: The Genesis of Chinook Jargon
Author: George Lang
Format: Paperback
, 2008
  • A two-edged sword of reconciliation and betrayal, Chinook Jargon (aka Wawa) arose at the interface of "Indian" and "White" societies in the Pacific Northwest. Wawa's sources lie first in the language of the Chinookans who lived along the lower Columbia River, but also with the Nootkans of the outer coast of Vancouver Island. With the arrival of the fur trade, the French of the engag's or voyageurs provided additional vocabulary and a set of viable cultural practices, a key element of which was marital bonding with Indian and m'tisse women. These women and their children were the first fluent speakers of Wawa.

    After several decades of contact, ensuing epidemics brought demographic collapse to the Chinookans. Within another decade the region was radically transformed by the Oregon Trail. Wawa had acquired its present shape, but lost its homeland. It became a diaspora language in which many communities seek some trace of their past. A previously unpublished glossary of Wawa circa 1825 is included as an appendix to this volume.

    Making Wawa will attract the attention of linguists, especially those involved in contact linguistics and the languages of the Pacific Northwest. It will also interest historians and other scholars interested in Native and gender studies, cross-cultural conflict, and transculturation.

$44.95

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