English First Peoples 10/11

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English 10/11 First Peoples recommended resources.


An Anthology of Canadian Native Literature 4th Edition
Format: Paperback
, 2013
  • This collection presents writing in English by Canadian Native authors featuring prose selections, traditional songs, short stories, plays, poems and essays, showing a complexity and rich wealth of this culture.

$120.00

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Annie Mae's Movement
Author: Yvette Nolan
Format: Paperback
, 2007
  • Annie Mae''s Movement explores what is must have been like to be Anna Mae Pictou Aquash, a woman in a man''s movement, a Canadian in America, an American Indian in a white-dominant culture. This play looks for the truth by examining the life and death of this remarkable woman.

$16.95

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April Raintree
Format: Paperback
, 1999
  • Very few of us have a proper understanding of the tragic and painful circumstances of native life in urban Canada. A truly black mark on the record of the Canadian government and Canadian society as a whole, these problems are dealt with by the astute and truthful writing of Beatrice Culleton. In Search Of April Raintree is a work of autobiographical fiction that not only brings the reader into a genuine and difficult aspect of urban life, but also reveals Culleton`s significant talents.

$19.00

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Born With a Tooth
Author: Joseph Boyden
Format: Paperback
, 2008
  • Almost a decade after its original publication, award winner and Governor General Literary Award nominee Joseph Boyden's classic book of short stories is finally being reissued. Born With A Tooth, Boyden's debut work of fiction, is a collection of thirteen beautifully written stories about aboriginal life in Ontario. They are stories of love, unexpected triumph, and a passionate belief in dreams. They are also stories of anger and longing, of struggling to adapt, of searching but remaining unfulfilled. The collection includes 'Bearwalker', a story that introduces a character who appears again in Boyden's novel Three Day Road. By taking on a new voice in each story, Joseph Boyden explores aboriginal stereotypes and traditions in a most unexpected way. Whether told by a woman trying to forget her past or by a drunken man trying to preserve his culture, each story paints an unforgettable and varied image of modern aboriginal culture in Ontario. An extraordinary first book, Born With A Tooth reveals why Joseph Boyden is a writer worth reading.

$22.00

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Cibou
Format: Paperback
, 2008
  • Sensitive and enlightening, Cibou is set in 17th-century Mi'kma'ki, territory of the Mi'kmaq of Maritime Canada. The story is that of a young Mi'kmaq woman and her relationship with Jesuit missionary Anthony Daniel - a historical figure who was first stationed in Cape Breton in 1632 - and his brother, Captain Charles Daniel who had established a French trading post in 1629. The priest Daniel was later posted to Huronia where, 14 years later, he met a violent end and martyrdom as Saint Anthony Daniel. Susan Biagi has woven a marvelously intuitive tale ... at once beautiful and harsh, observing the simple and dangerous lives of cultures interacting on the threshold of new world history.

$19.95

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Colour of Resistance
Author: Connie Fife
Format: Paperback
, 1998
  • A powerful collection of works in response to 500 years of colonization, and the worldwide celebrations marking the anniversary of European invasion. Contributors include Chrystos, Beth Brant, Joy Harjo and Lee Maracle.

$19.95

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Medicine River
Author: Thomas King
Format: Paperback
, 2005
  • When Will returns to Medicine River, he thinks he is simply attending his mother's funeral. He doesn't count on Harlen Bigbear and his unique brand of community planning. Harlen tries to sell Will on the idea of returning to Medicine River to open shop as the town's only Native photographer. Somehow, that's exactly what happens.

    Through Will's gentle and humorous narrative, we come to know Medicine River, a small Albertan town bordering a Blackfoot reserve. And we meet its people: the basketball team; Louise Heavyman and her daughter, South Wing; Martha Oldcrow, the marriage doctor; Joe Bigbear, Harlen's world-travelling, storytelling brother; Bertha Morley, who has a short fling with a Calgary dating service; and David Plume, who went to Wounded Knee. At the centre of it all is Harlen, advising and pestering, annoying and entertaining, gossiping and benevolently interfering in the lives of his friends and neighbours.

$20.00

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Someday: A Native American Drama
Format: Paperback
, 1993
  • Someday is a powerful new play by award-winning playwright Drew Hayden Taylor. The story in Someday, though told through fictional characters and full of Taylor''s distinctive wit and humour, is based on the real-life tragedies suffered by many Native Canadian families.

    Anne Wabung's daughter was taken away by children's aid workers when the girl was only a toddler. It is Christmastime 35 years later, and Anne''s yearning to see her now-grown daughter is stronger than ever.

    When the family is finally reunited, however, the dreams of neither women are fulfilled.

    The setting for the play is a fictional Ojibway community, but could be any reserve in Canada, where thousands of Native children were removed from their families in what is known among Native people as the "scoop-up" of the 1950s and 1960s. Someday is an entertaining, humourous, and spirited play that packs an intense emotional wallop.

$12.95

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The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian
Author: Sherman Alexie
Traditional Territory: Spokane
Format: Paperback
, 2009
  • In his first book for young adults, bestselling author Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author's own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings that reflect the character's art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he was destined to live.

$20.99

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The Night Wanderer: A Native Gothic Novel
Format: Paperback
, 2007
  • A sleepy native reservation. A troubled teen girl. A vampire returns home.

    Nothing ever happens on the Otter Lake reservation. But when 16-year-old Tiffany discovers her father is renting out her room, she''s deeply upset. Sure, their guest is polite and keeps to himself. But he''s also a little creepy.

    Little do Tiffany, her father or even her astute Granny Ruth suspect the truth. The mysterious Pierre L''Errant is actually a vampire, returning to his tribal home after centuries spent in Europe. But Tiffany has other things on her mind: her new boyfriend is acting weird, disputes with her father are escalating, and her estranged mother is starting a new life with somebody else.

    Fed up and heartsick, Tiffany threatens drastic measures and flees into the bush. There, in the midnight woods, a chilling encounter with L''Errant changes everything... for both of them.

    A mesmerizing blend of Gothic thriller and modern coming-of-age novel, The Night Wanderer is unlike any other vampire story.

$12.95

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Things Fall Apart
Author: Chinua Achebe
Format: Paperback
, 1994
  • One of Chinua Achebe's many achievements in his acclaimed first novel, Things Fall Apart, is his relentlessly unsentimental rendering of Nigerian tribal life before and after the coming of colonialism. First published in 1958, just two years before Nigeria declared independence from Great Britain, the book eschews the obvious temptation of depicting pre-colonial life as a kind of Eden. Instead, Achebe sketches a world in which violence, war, and suffering exist, but are balanced by a strong sense of tradition, ritual, and social coherence. His Ibo protagonist, Okonkwo, is a self-made man. The son of a charming ne'er-do-well, he has worked all his life to overcome his father's weakness and has arrived, finally, at great prosperity and even greater reputation among his fellows in the village of Umuofia. Okonkwo is a champion wrestler, a prosperous farmer, husband to three wives and father to several children. He is also a man who exhibits flaws well-known in Greek tragedy:

    Okonkwo ruled his household with a heavy hand. His wives, especially the youngest, lived in perpetual fear of his fiery temper, and so did his little children. Perhaps down in his heart Okonkwo was not a cruel man. But his whole life was dominated by fear, the fear of failure and of weakness. It was deeper and more intimate than the fear of evil and capricious gods and of magic, the fear of the forest, and of the forces of nature, malevolent, red in tooth and claw. Okonkwo's fear was greater than these. It was not external but lay deep within himself. It was the fear of himself, lest he should be found to resemble his father.

    And yet Achebe manages to make this cruel man deeply sympathetic. He is fond of his eldest daughter, and also of Ikemefuna, a young boy sent from another village as compensation for the wrongful death of a young woman from Umuofia. He even begins to feel pride in his eldest son, in whom he has too often seen his own father. Unfortunately, a series of tragic events tests the mettle of this strong man, and it is his fear of weakness that ultimately undoes him.

    Achebe does not introduce the theme of colonialism until the last 50 pages or so. By then, Okonkwo has lost everything and been driven into exile. And yet, within the traditions of his culture, he still has hope of redemption. The arrival of missionaries in Umuofia, however, followed by representatives of the colonial government, completely disrupts Ibo culture, and in the chasm between old ways and new, Okonkwo is lost forever. Deceptively simple in its prose, Things Fall Apart packs a powerful punch as Achebe holds up the ruin of one proud man to stand for the destruction of an entire culture.

$17.95

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Traplines
Author: Eden Robinson
Format: Paperback
, 1996
  • From Canada's internationally acclaimed "Generation X laureate" (The New York Times) come four unforgettable stories told with icy clarity and great heart. This is a world in which fast food, banged-up cars and the grunge of modern adolescence barely camouflage the dark extremes of sex, fear and desire and the longing for love.

$22.00

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